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Old 29-08-2009, 10:58 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default May well be a bad winter-But a good Stew/Soup Winter

You favorites?

Mine-beef stew: potatoes, carrots, meat in a pressure cooker w/a can of
tomato soup. I don't have a pressure cooker-Mom's recipe.



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Old 29-08-2009, 11:10 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default May well be a bad winter-But a good Stew/Soup Winter


"Kswck" wrote in message
...
You favorites?

Mine-beef stew: potatoes, carrots, meat in a pressure cooker w/a can of
tomato soup. I don't have a pressure cooker-Mom's recipe.

Beef pot roast done on stove top, simmering all afternoon. Chunks of
carrots and small whole potatoes added at the end.
Janet


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Old 29-08-2009, 11:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default May well be a bad winter-But a good Stew/Soup Winter

In article ,
"Kswck" wrote:

Your favorites?


Pork Chops Braised in Cider with Apples




from the StL Post Dispatch

Pat dry

8 lean pork chops (approximately 3 lbs)

Rub both sides generously with

fresh ground black pepper
2 * 3 tsp dried thyme

Spread

1/2 cup flour

on a plate. Coat each chop with flour shaking off access. Heat a
skillet with a thin coating of oil. Add enough chops to cover surface
of pan in a single layer. Brown both sides. Remove to plate.

If any access oil remains, drain to a couple of table spoons. Add

1 medium onion, chopped
2 ribs celery, chopped
2 medium carrots, chopped

Saute to tender, about 5 minutes. Return pork to pan. Add

2 3/4 cups chicken stock
1 3/4 cups apple cider

Stir occasionally while simmering for 60-70 minutes, until very tender.

While simmering, heat

2 Tbsp butter

in a skillet. Heat

3-4 tart apples, peeled and sliced

until lightly browned and tender, about 5 minutes. Set aside.

When meat is done, arrange in a baking dish. Season with pepper if
desired. If sauce in pan is still runny, reduce to thicken. Pour over
meat. Sprinkle with

1 cup cheese, shredded; cheddar, havarti or jarlsberg suggested

Scatter apples over cheese. Brown in broiler, approximately 3 minutes.
Sprinkle with parsley.

-=-=-=-=-=-

If making in advance, reheat in oven 15-20 minutes at 350° before adding
cheese and apples and placing in the broiler.



jt
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Old 30-08-2009, 01:52 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default May well be a bad winter-But a good Stew/Soup Winter

Kswck wrote:
You favorites?

Mine-beef stew: potatoes, carrots, meat in a pressure cooker w/a can of
tomato soup. I don't have a pressure cooker-Mom's recipe.



Winter cooking:

Stew:
Browned meat, onions, celery, carrots, a can of chopped tomatoes,
a cup of red wine,couple of cloves of garlic if I remember, all
in a LeCreuset dutch oven, either on the stovetop or in the oven.
Various herbs. Add potatoes halfway through cooking. Simmer till tender.
Serve with corn muffins or sliced French baguette.


Stewed Chicken with rice
Chicken soup
Beef-vegetable soup, w. barley or not
Roast chicken
Chili
Chicken chili
Green chili with pork
Spaghetti sauce (in various combinations)

gloria p

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Old 30-08-2009, 02:58 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default May well be a bad winter-But a good Stew/Soup Winter

On Aug 29, 5:58*pm, "Kswck" wrote:
You favorites?

Mine-beef stew: potatoes, carrots, meat in a pressure cooker w/a can of
tomato soup. I don't have a pressure cooker-Mom's recipe.


Ribollita! Italian soup with bits of pancetta, cannelini beans,
carrots, spinach & tomato in broth. Very hearty & warming on a cold
night.

Kris


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Old 30-08-2009, 03:03 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default May well be a bad winter-But a good Stew/Soup Winter

On Aug 29, 8:24*pm, "Michael \"Dog3\"" wrote:
"Janet Bostwick" om:in rec.food.cooking



"Kswck" wrote in message
...
You favorites?


Mine-beef stew: potatoes, carrots, meat in a pressure cooker w/a can of
tomato soup. I don't have a pressure cooker-Mom's recipe.


Beef pot roast done on stove top, simmering all afternoon. *Chunks of
carrots and small whole potatoes added at the end.


Now that just made me hungry again I also like Swiss steak.

Michael

--
“Always tell the truth - it's the easiest thing to remember”
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * ~ American Playwright David Mamet

You can find me at: - michael at lonergan dot us dot com


Thanks for the ideas! I bet I can eat most of these even with no
teeth!. I had chili today. Swiss Steak should work if I really cook
it low and slow. I make the kind with tomato - not the one with
mushrooms and brown gravy (I use that recipe for meatballs with
noodles or mashed potatoes.)
Lynn in Fargo
Making a pilgrimage to the Farmers Market. Gonna make fresh vegetable
and beef soup with parsnips, rutabaga, green beans, carrots, celery,
onions, cabbage, corn, peas, baby potatoes, zuchinni, and
dumplings . . . no turnips!
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Old 30-08-2009, 03:15 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default May well be a bad winter-But a good Stew/Soup Winter

Kswck wrote:

You favorites?

Mine-beef stew: potatoes, carrots, meat in a pressure cooker w/a can of
tomato soup. I don't have a pressure cooker-Mom's recipe.


As I sit here in my sweltering office with 100°F heat outside, I am not
exactly thinking about winter meals! But here are some I recall:

Braised short ribs with Guinness
Cottage pie from the leftover short ribs
Chili (especially on Super Bowl Sunday)
Lin's ham, cabbage, and potato soup
Damsel's spicy split pea soup with pepperoni
Braised spare ribs
Pastitsio
Portuguese caldo
Chinese "Master Sauce" pork
Leg of lamb braised with cumin, chiles, and orange peel
Pot-a-feu
Coq au vin
Chicken and dumplings
Braised lamb shanks
Braised oxtails
Sukiyaki


Bob

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Old 30-08-2009, 04:12 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default May well be a bad winter-But a good Stew/Soup Winter

On Aug 29, 5:58*pm, "Kswck" wrote:
You favorites?

Mine-beef stew: potatoes, carrots, meat in a pressure cooker w/a can of
tomato soup. I don't have a pressure cooker-Mom's recipe.


I'm a fan of vegetable bean soup. My Mom's recipe stands us in good
stead, makes 3 or 4 quarts, and freezes well when we get tired of it.
So darned healthy it'll kill you.

maxine in ri
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Old 30-08-2009, 04:26 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default May well be a bad winter-But a good Stew/Soup Winter


"Bob Terwilliger" wrote in message
...
Kswck wrote:

You favorites?

Mine-beef stew: potatoes, carrots, meat in a pressure cooker w/a can of
tomato soup. I don't have a pressure cooker-Mom's recipe.


As I sit here in my sweltering office with 100°F heat outside, I am not
exactly thinking about winter meals! But here are some I recall:

Braised short ribs with Guinness
Cottage pie from the leftover short ribs
Chili (especially on Super Bowl Sunday)
Lin's ham, cabbage, and potato soup
Damsel's spicy split pea soup with pepperoni
Braised spare ribs
Pastitsio
Portuguese caldo
Chinese "Master Sauce" pork
Leg of lamb braised with cumin, chiles, and orange peel
Pot-a-feu
Coq au vin
Chicken and dumplings
Braised lamb shanks
Braised oxtails
Sukiyaki


Bob


I don't think there is that much winter to go around ;o}
Janet



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Old 30-08-2009, 05:09 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default May well be a bad winter-But a good Stew/Soup Winter

Janet wrote:

Braised short ribs with Guinness
Cottage pie from the leftover short ribs
Chili (especially on Super Bowl Sunday)
Lin's ham, cabbage, and potato soup
Damsel's spicy split pea soup with pepperoni
Braised spare ribs
Pastitsio
Portuguese caldo
Chinese "Master Sauce" pork
Leg of lamb braised with cumin, chiles, and orange peel
Pot-a-feu
Coq au vin
Chicken and dumplings
Braised lamb shanks
Braised oxtails
Sukiyaki


I don't think there is that much winter to go around ;o}


Yeah, maybe it would have to be spread out over two or three winters. If
only I had a house in New Zealand where I could spend this time of year!

Bob



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Old 30-08-2009, 05:38 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default May well be a bad winter-But a good Stew/Soup Winter

"Michael \"Dog3\"" wrote in
on Aug Sat 2009 pm

"Kswck" :
in rec.food.cooking

You favorites?

Mine-beef stew: potatoes, carrots, meat in a pressure cooker w/a can
of tomato soup. I don't have a pressure cooker-Mom's recipe.


I like so many of them. I'm a soup and stew person. Beef stew is
great. I love squash soup, potato soup, pork stew, chicken soup, chili
verde and so many others. Too many to list.

Michael


@@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format

Al's Bean And Sausage Soup

Soups/Chowders/Stews

2 tablespoons canola oil
1 pound kielbasa sausage, diced
4 large garlic cloves, chopped (7)
1 bulb fennel; chopped
1 onion; chopped
2 carrots; chopped
10 large Button mushrooms; chopped
1 celery heart with leaves
1 small bag spinach leaves or 1/2 small cabbage
3 900 ml box chicken broth
4 cups water; plus
2 tbsp redibase turkey stock
2 15 oz cans can navy beans
1 15 oz can can diced tomatoes with herbs
1 500ml ctner sour cream
1 tbsp crushed red peppers; heaping
1 bunch fresh dill; mjnced

Heat oil in heavy large Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add sausage and
garlic and sauté until sausage is lightly browned, about 8 minutes. Add in
crushed peppers,fennel,onion, carrot, mushrooms and celery,;cook about 5
minutes more. Add broth, water, turkey stock navy beans with their juices
and spinach. Simmer until flavors blend and soup thickens slightly, about
20 minutes. Stir in the sour cream and dill simmer 5 more minutes. Season
to taste with salt and pepper.

Ladle soup into bowls.

10-3 cup servings approx

Replacing the spinach with cabbage works well.

could use more sour cream


** Exported from Now You're Cooking! v5.85 **



--
Is that your nose, or are you eatting a banana? -Alan



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Old 30-08-2009, 05:41 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default May well be a bad winter-But a good Stew/Soup Winter

On Aug 29, 10:03 pm, Lynn from Fargo Ografmorffig
wrote:
On Aug 29, 8:24 pm, "Michael \"Dog3\"" wrote:



"Janet Bostwick" m:inrec.food.cooking


"Kswck" wrote in message
...
You favorites?


Mine-beef stew: potatoes, carrots, meat in a pressure cooker w/a can of
tomato soup. I don't have a pressure cooker-Mom's recipe.


Beef pot roast done on stove top, simmering all afternoon. Chunks of
carrots and small whole potatoes added at the end.


Now that just made me hungry again I also like Swiss steak.


Michael


--
“Always tell the truth - it's the easiest thing to remember”
~ American Playwright David Mamet


You can find me at: - michael at lonergan dot us dot com


Thanks for the ideas! I bet I can eat most of these even with no
teeth!. I had chili today. Swiss Steak should work if I really cook
it low and slow. I make the kind with tomato - not the one with
mushrooms and brown gravy (I use that recipe for meatballs with
noodles or mashed potatoes.)
Lynn in Fargo
Making a pilgrimage to the Farmers Market. Gonna make fresh vegetable
and beef soup with parsnips, rutabaga, green beans, carrots, celery,
onions, cabbage, corn, peas, baby potatoes, zuchinni, and
dumplings . . . no turnips!



Parsnip and rutabaga, but the turnip is barred from the party? How
about a swede? The soup sounds great, and , of course, I'm not going
to argue about personal taste. I'm just curious about how you draw
your hard line between the roots.

Bulka

Bulka
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Old 30-08-2009, 05:46 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default May well be a bad winter-But a good Stew/Soup Winter

On Aug 29, 8:52 pm, Gloria P wrote:

garlic if I remember


"If I remember'' garlic in a winter stew? I'm speachless.

Bulka




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Old 30-08-2009, 05:58 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default May well be a bad winter-But a good Stew/Soup Winter


In the winter, my slow cooker barely gets time to cool off for a quick
cleaning, unless I feel the need for some waste heat from the range
oven. Never been a fan of recipies - I'll read' em but won't follow
them, so every time is different depending on today's inspiration and
what I have on hand.

Even in the summer there is usually homede stock and an evolving pot
of some soup/stew.

Is there a Hot, Wet Food movement?

Bulka
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Old 30-08-2009, 06:15 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default May well be a bad winter-But a good Stew/Soup Winter

Kris wrote:

Ribollita! Italian soup with bits of pancetta, cannelini beans,
carrots, spinach & tomato in broth. Very hearty & warming on a cold
night.


That's convalescent fare, an emaciated minestrone perhaps, but not
ribollita.

Here is the real ribillita, from
http://www.divinacucina.com/code/ribollita.html

Victor

Ribollita (Tuscan Vegetable and Bread Soup)

Tuscan cuisine is famous for giving new life to leftovers. This dish is
a perfect example. An icon of Tuscan cuisine, ribollita literally means
"reboiled." It's difficult to find an authentic ribolitta because it
takes 3 days to prepare. Minestrone is made the first day and eaten as
is. The second day the leftover soup is layered with thin slices of
bread (or toasted bread rubbed with garlic) and baked with thin slices
of red onion on top. The third day the leftovers are reboiled.

Recipes for minestrone vary from region to region, restaurant to
restaurant, and household to household. Most recipes are based upon
regional produce. The most important ingredient is Tuscan minestrone is
cavolo nero, or a winter black cabbage. Its leaves range in color from
dark green to almost black. Once grown only in Tuscany, enterprising
farmers in California's Salinas Valley are now growing it along with
Royal Rose radicchio. If you cannot find black cabbage, substitute
kale, chard, or use only Savoy cabbage.

Here's the recipe!

4 tablespoons olive oil
1 red onion, chopped
1 leek, white part only, chopped
1 garlic clove, chopped
4 carrots, sliced into half-inch rounds
4 zucchini, sliced into half-inch rounds
One-quarter whole Savoy cabbage, shredded and chopped
1 bunch cavolo nero or kale
1 small bunch spinach, shredded and chopped
4 potatoes, peeled and cut into one-half inch cubes
1 cup green beans, cut into bite-size pieces
2 cups Tuscan white beans, one-half cup pureed and one-half cup whole
2 tablespoons coarse sea salt or kosher salt
4 tablespoons tomato paste
1 pound stale Italian bread, sliced

Heat the olive oil in a large pot and sauté the onion and leek together
over low heat until they begin to burn slightly. Add the garlic and
sauté for 1 minute. Add all the remaining vegetables. Season with sea
salt and stir to mix in the onions and leeks evenly. Cover and cook for
20 minutes or until the vegetables have reduced in volume by half. Stir
again and cover with water to the top of the pot. The more water you
add, the more broth you will have with the soup. Bring to a boil and
then lower the heat. Add the tomato paste and stir to dissolve. Cover
and cook the soup for 1 hour. Add the Tuscan beans.

This is the minestrone soup. The next day layer the soup in a deep
baking dish with the stale bread and bake. Top with thinly sliced red
onions before baking.

The next day, if there's any soup left over, reboil the soup, stirring
well to break up the bread slices. The soup should be thick enough to
eat with a fork! It's served with the traditional drizzle of extra
virgin olive oil on top.


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