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Old 27-05-2008, 11:29 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Spin Off of Barb's Spin off of Squeaks Family Recipe Collections and Nostalgia

Ok, we've seen what recipes you would want to pass down....that got me to thinking
about all of the recipes that have been passed down to *me*. Not just from my mom,
but from my aunts and uncles and both grandmothers, and one single recipe from my
grandpa who never cooked but made an awesome salad dressing.

My favorites are sometimes more techniques than they are recipes, and my grandma Ma's
recipes often included measurements like "A handful of..." "A couple soup spoons
of...", and instructions like "mix it til it feels right".

What are your favorite family recipes?

kimberly


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Old 28-05-2008, 01:55 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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"Nexis" wrote in message
...
Ok, we've seen what recipes you would want to pass down....that got me to
thinking about all of the recipes that have been passed down to *me*. Not
just from my mom, but from my aunts and uncles and both grandmothers, and
one single recipe from my grandpa who never cooked but made an awesome
salad dressing.

My favorites are sometimes more techniques than they are recipes, and my
grandma Ma's recipes often included measurements like "A handful of..." "A
couple soup spoons of...", and instructions like "mix it til it feels
right".

What are your favorite family recipes?

kimberly


Holiday favorites:

Pop's potatoes -
Boiled potato chunks with butter (real) & parsley sometimes a little
additional cream or sour cream. I cook them enough so the starch rubs off
to form a starchy sauce.

Real Boston Baked Beans
Baked in a bean pot for 24 to 36 hours. Beans, molasses, 1 hole onion, salt
pork, brown sugar, allspice or powdered ginger or powdered mustard.

Apple Brined Smoked Turkey
Orange/brown sugar glazed whole ham. (bean soup later)
Tiny's (came to San Diego from Iowa in 1900 at age 10, She died at age 105)
German Cabbage (Red cabbage with onion & apple)

More, much more, too much more.


--
Old Scoundrel

(AKA Dimitri)




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Old 28-05-2008, 04:35 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Spin Off of Barb's Spin off of Squeaks Family Recipe Collections and Nostalgia

On Tue, 27 May 2008 15:29:49 -0700, "Nexis" wrote:

What are your favorite family recipes?


From Mom: potato salad (with hard boiled eggs, radishes and peas)
From Dad: None

From Mom's mom: chicken & rice
(although my method is completely different)
pie crust & pies in general (not that I make pie very often)
From Dad's mom: the desire to make home made mac & cheese
(no recipe from her - although I think I've duplicated her method)
pork - with sherry gravy which led to putting sherry in chicken gravy
no recipe.... but wish I had one for: swedish "dollar" pancakes



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Old 28-05-2008, 12:08 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Spin Off of Barb's Spin off of Squeaks Family Recipe Collections and Nostalgia

Nexis wrote:
My favorites are sometimes more techniques than they are recipes, and
my grandma Ma's recipes often included measurements like "A handful
of..." "A couple soup spoons of...", and instructions like "mix it
til it feels right".

Grandma Mac's "butter the size of a walnut" is classic Also some of the
tastiest candy on the planet.

Date Nut Coconut Candy
2 c. white sugar
1 c. milk
1-1/2 Tbs. butter
approx 1 c. chopped dates
1 c. chopped walnuts
1 c. shredded sweet coconut
1 tsp. vanilla extract

Combine sugar, milk and butter and cook until it reaches the soft ball stage
(test in cold water - mixture will flatten but can be picked up). Add
chopped dates and cook 5 minutes longer. Add chopped walnuts, coconut and
vanilla. Beat until very thick.

Grease a 3 inch strip on 6 feet of waxed paper. Spoon the mixture along the
strip and spread with a knife into a square shape. Be careful, the mixture
is very hot. Let candy set, then cut into 1 inch squares. Wrap each piece
in waxed paper.

Jill


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Old 28-05-2008, 01:35 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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"jmcquown" wrote in message
...
Nexis wrote:
My favorites are sometimes more techniques than they are recipes, and
my grandma Ma's recipes often included measurements like "A handful
of..." "A couple soup spoons of...", and instructions like "mix it
til it feels right".

Grandma Mac's "butter the size of a walnut" is classic



My Grandma was a widow who singly raised five sons (from about 1910 on until
she died in the 60's) along with most of the township before any concept of
"Daycare" was invented. Talk about a cook -- she was the lady you went to
for 150 lbs. of potato salad for your wedding reception, that kind of thing.
Always had two thirty-two- cup pots of coffee on the stove because the world
came and went all day every day and night.

When I was small she cooked on a coal-fired range. There was a different
kind cake every night for supper, and I remember sitting at the kitchen
table watching her make one -- it took her all of 30 seconds from big bowl
and spoon onto the counter until popping it in the oven. All the dry stuff
was in the cupboard at hand, and she just scooped it in the bowl by the
handfuls, poured in the milk and eggs and stirred (In those days you held
the big bowl in the crook of your arm while mixing) then dumped it in the
cake pans. There was always someplace in the oven, along with the roast,
that was the right temp for a cake. She seldom frosted them except for
birthdays, and often spread them with her homemade jams.

I think the only thing she ever measured was a teaspoon of sugar in her tea,
which she poured into and drank from the saucer. I have never seen a written
recipe in her hand.

Buddy




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Old 28-05-2008, 05:53 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Spin Off of Barb's Spin off of Squeaks Family Recipe Collections and Nostalgia

On Tue, 27 May 2008 15:29:49 -0700, "Nexis" wrote:

Ok, we've seen what recipes you would want to pass down....that got me to thinking
about all of the recipes that have been passed down to *me*. Not just from my mom,
but from my aunts and uncles and both grandmothers, and one single recipe from my
grandpa who never cooked but made an awesome salad dressing.

My favorites are sometimes more techniques than they are recipes, and my grandma Ma's
recipes often included measurements like "A handful of..." "A couple soup spoons
of...", and instructions like "mix it til it feels right".

What are your favorite family recipes?

kimberly


i think i've posted this before, but i remember reading a story about
someone transcribing his mother's recipes:

mom: and then add a little water.

son: how much water?

mom (thinking): oh, about a mouthful.

your pal,
blake
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Old 28-05-2008, 07:01 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Spin Off of Barb's Spin off of Squeaks Family Recipe Collections and Nostalgia


"Nina" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 27 May 2008 15:29:49 -0700, "Nexis" wrote:

Ok, we've seen what recipes you would want to pass down....that got me to
thinking
about all of the recipes that have been passed down to *me*. Not just
from my mom,
but from my aunts and uncles and both grandmothers, and one single recipe
from my
grandpa who never cooked but made an awesome salad dressing.

My favorites are sometimes more techniques than they are recipes, and my
grandma Ma's
recipes often included measurements like "A handful of..." "A couple soup
spoons
of...", and instructions like "mix it til it feels right".

What are your favorite family recipes?


The Christmas cookies that my grandmother used to make... some
wonderful caraway wafers, and cornucopias of dough and candied fruits,
things like that.

My mother's recipe for pearl onions in cream with cloves.

My other grandmother's plum chutney... and that, unfortunately, is a
lost recipe. I can't find it, and I don't remember it well enough to
recreate it.

Yorkshire puddings. Not a unique family recipe, but for years I've
absolutely refused to learn to make them because it's such a treat
when someone else does. Probably weird reasoning, but still...

My sister's duck with curry sauce. Unbelievably good.





Nina, try Barb and George's other milleau, rec.food.preserving , someone
there maybe able to help you recreate the plum chutney.
-ginny


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Old 29-05-2008, 03:12 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Spin Off of Barb's Spin off of Squeaks Family Recipe Collectionsand Nostalgia

Nexis wrote:


What are your favorite family recipes?


This isn't a recipe but a family story told to all the girls when they
learned to bake.

Once there was a handsome prince who traveled through his country
looking for a thrifty wife. Not just any pretty girl would do. She had
to be thrifty.

One day he came to a village where all the young maidens were baking
cakes. He stopped at one house and asked to lick the bowl. The young
woman gave him most of the batter. He thanked her and went to the next
house where he asked to lick the bowl and was given another huge amount
of batter. This went on in all the houses in the village where the
maidens were baking.

On his way out of town, he passed a poor hut where he saw a young woman
mixing a bowl of batter. He went inside and asked her if he could lick
the bowl. She scraped everything she could from the bowl into her cake
pan and gave him a pretty-much empty bowl to lick.

The prince immediately asked her father for her hand in marriage and
they got married and lived happily ever after.

The moral of the story is (I think) if you never waste food, you will
marry a handsome prince.

My mother told me the story. She said that her own mother had told it to
her. I imparted it to my daughter and to my granddaughters.

Not exactly a family recipe, but definitely a family cooking treasure.


--
Janet Wilder
Bad spelling. Bad punctuation
Good Friends. Good Life
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Old 29-05-2008, 03:33 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Spin Off of Barb's Spin off of Squeaks Family Recipe Collections and Nostalgia

On Wed 28 May 2008 07:12:32p, Janet Wilder told us...

Nexis wrote:


What are your favorite family recipes?


This isn't a recipe but a family story told to all the girls when they
learned to bake.

Once there was a handsome prince who traveled through his country
looking for a thrifty wife. Not just any pretty girl would do. She had
to be thrifty.

One day he came to a village where all the young maidens were baking
cakes. He stopped at one house and asked to lick the bowl. The young
woman gave him most of the batter. He thanked her and went to the next
house where he asked to lick the bowl and was given another huge amount
of batter. This went on in all the houses in the village where the
maidens were baking.

On his way out of town, he passed a poor hut where he saw a young woman
mixing a bowl of batter. He went inside and asked her if he could lick
the bowl. She scraped everything she could from the bowl into her cake
pan and gave him a pretty-much empty bowl to lick.

The prince immediately asked her father for her hand in marriage and
they got married and lived happily ever after.

The moral of the story is (I think) if you never waste food, you will
marry a handsome prince.

My mother told me the story. She said that her own mother had told it to
her. I imparted it to my daughter and to my granddaughters.

Not exactly a family recipe, but definitely a family cooking treasure.



It is indeed! Did you marry a handsome prine? :-)

--
Wayne Boatwright
-------------------------------------------
Wednesday, 05(V)/28(XXVIII)/08(MMVIII)
-------------------------------------------
-------------------------------------------
How come wrong numbers are never busy?
-------------------------------------------




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Old 29-05-2008, 05:28 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Spin Off of Barb's Spin off of Squeaks Family Recipe Collectionsand Nostalgia

Wayne Boatwright wrote:
On Wed 28 May 2008 07:12:32p, Janet Wilder told us...

Nexis wrote:

What are your favorite family recipes?

This isn't a recipe but a family story told to all the girls when they
learned to bake.

Once there was a handsome prince who traveled through his country
looking for a thrifty wife. Not just any pretty girl would do. She had
to be thrifty.

One day he came to a village where all the young maidens were baking
cakes. He stopped at one house and asked to lick the bowl. The young
woman gave him most of the batter. He thanked her and went to the next
house where he asked to lick the bowl and was given another huge amount
of batter. This went on in all the houses in the village where the
maidens were baking.

On his way out of town, he passed a poor hut where he saw a young woman
mixing a bowl of batter. He went inside and asked her if he could lick
the bowl. She scraped everything she could from the bowl into her cake
pan and gave him a pretty-much empty bowl to lick.

The prince immediately asked her father for her hand in marriage and
they got married and lived happily ever after.

The moral of the story is (I think) if you never waste food, you will
marry a handsome prince.

My mother told me the story. She said that her own mother had told it to
her. I imparted it to my daughter and to my granddaughters.

Not exactly a family recipe, but definitely a family cooking treasure.



It is indeed! Did you marry a handsome prince? :-)


Both were handsome, but the first one was a frog in disguise. The second
one IS a prince. g

--
Janet Wilder
Bad spelling. Bad punctuation
Good Friends. Good Life


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Old 29-05-2008, 01:13 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Spin Off of Barb's Spin off of Squeaks Family Recipe Collections and Nostalgia

On Wed 28 May 2008 09:28:30p, Janet Wilder told us...

Wayne Boatwright wrote:
On Wed 28 May 2008 07:12:32p, Janet Wilder told us...

Nexis wrote:

What are your favorite family recipes?
This isn't a recipe but a family story told to all the girls when they
learned to bake.

Once there was a handsome prince who traveled through his country
looking for a thrifty wife. Not just any pretty girl would do. She had
to be thrifty.

One day he came to a village where all the young maidens were baking
cakes. He stopped at one house and asked to lick the bowl. The young
woman gave him most of the batter. He thanked her and went to the next
house where he asked to lick the bowl and was given another huge amount
of batter. This went on in all the houses in the village where the
maidens were baking.

On his way out of town, he passed a poor hut where he saw a young woman
mixing a bowl of batter. He went inside and asked her if he could lick
the bowl. She scraped everything she could from the bowl into her cake
pan and gave him a pretty-much empty bowl to lick.

The prince immediately asked her father for her hand in marriage and
they got married and lived happily ever after.

The moral of the story is (I think) if you never waste food, you will
marry a handsome prince.

My mother told me the story. She said that her own mother had told it

to
her. I imparted it to my daughter and to my granddaughters.

Not exactly a family recipe, but definitely a family cooking treasure.



It is indeed! Did you marry a handsome prince? :-)


Both were handsome, but the first one was a frog in disguise. The second
one IS a prince. g


Good for you!

--
Wayne Boatwright
-------------------------------------------
Thursday, 05(V)/29(XXIX)/08(MMVIII)
-------------------------------------------
-------------------------------------------
Cats must push the VCR off the top of
the TV.
-------------------------------------------



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Old 30-05-2008, 06:53 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Spin Off of Barb's Spin off of Squeaks Family Recipe Collections and Nostalgia


"Buddy" wrote in message
...

"jmcquown" wrote in message
...
Nexis wrote:
My favorites are sometimes more techniques than they are recipes, and
my grandma Ma's recipes often included measurements like "A handful
of..." "A couple soup spoons of...", and instructions like "mix it
til it feels right".

Grandma Mac's "butter the size of a walnut" is classic



My Grandma was a widow who singly raised five sons (from about 1910 on
until
she died in the 60's) along with most of the township before any concept
of
"Daycare" was invented. Talk about a cook -- she was the lady you went to
for 150 lbs. of potato salad for your wedding reception, that kind of
thing.
Always had two thirty-two- cup pots of coffee on the stove because the
world
came and went all day every day and night.

When I was small she cooked on a coal-fired range. There was a different
kind cake every night for supper, and I remember sitting at the kitchen
table watching her make one -- it took her all of 30 seconds from big
bowl
and spoon onto the counter until popping it in the oven. All the dry stuff
was in the cupboard at hand, and she just scooped it in the bowl by the
handfuls, poured in the milk and eggs and stirred (In those days you held
the big bowl in the crook of your arm while mixing) then dumped it in the
cake pans. There was always someplace in the oven, along with the roast,
that was the right temp for a cake. She seldom frosted them except for
birthdays, and often spread them with her homemade jams.

I think the only thing she ever measured was a teaspoon of sugar in her
tea,
which she poured into and drank from the saucer. I have never seen a
written
recipe in her hand.

Buddy



These are lovely stories. I do miss my grandparents when I read things like
this. They *all* had their quirks and amazing abilities!

HH




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