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Old 15-02-2008, 01:47 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Removing Baked-on Oil from Pans

In researching the archives for how to clean oil from aluminum pans, I
found the advice mainly consisted of "elbow grease". However, I found
that a spray-on product called "Lift Off" to be highly effective in
removing oil residue; after spraying, it wiped off with a paper
towel. The active ingredient appears to be "Xylol", and is mainly
marketed towards removing stickers and such. My own can is over 10
years old, so I don't know if the brand is still made any more, but
surely some other similar spray uses the same chemical. (WD-40 is not
effective.)

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Old 15-02-2008, 04:09 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Removing Baked-on Oil from Pans

Greg Esres wrote:
:In researching the archives for how to clean oil from aluminum pans, I
:found the advice mainly consisted of "elbow grease". However, I found
:that a spray-on product called "Lift Off" to be highly effective in
:removing oil residue; after spraying, it wiped off with a paper
:towel. The active ingredient appears to be "Xylol", and is mainly
:marketed towards removing stickers and such. My own can is over 10
:years old, so I don't know if the brand is still made any more, but
:surely some other similar spray uses the same chemical. (WD-40 is not
:effective.)


Xylol is more commonly known as xylene. It's the active ingredient in
a bunch of spot removers. Goof-Off is a commmon brand in most of the
US. It's used as a thinner is some paint processes, and in some
carburator cleaners. I'm not at all surprised it cleans your grease
off pans.

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Old 15-02-2008, 04:45 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Removing Baked-on Oil from Pans

David Scheidt wrote:

Xylol is more commonly known as xylene.

Didn't know that, thanks. I've got plenty of Goof Off.
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Old 15-02-2008, 05:23 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Removing Baked-on Oil from Pans

On Thu, 14 Feb 2008 17:47:49 -0800 (PST), Greg Esres
wrote:

In researching the archives for how to clean oil from aluminum pans, I
found the advice mainly consisted of "elbow grease". However, I found
that a spray-on product called "Lift Off" to be highly effective in
removing oil residue; after spraying, it wiped off with a paper
towel. The active ingredient appears to be "Xylol", and is mainly
marketed towards removing stickers and such. My own can is over 10
years old, so I don't know if the brand is still made any more, but
surely some other similar spray uses the same chemical. (WD-40 is not
effective.)


Hmmmm. If a product marketed to remove stickers etc is good, then Goo
Gone should work. Give it a try.

--
See return address to reply by email
remove the smiley face first
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Old 15-02-2008, 05:08 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Removing Baked-on Oil from Pans

On Feb 14, 7:47*pm, Greg Esres wrote:
In researching the archives for how to clean oil from aluminum pans, I
found the advice mainly consisted of "elbow grease". *However, I found
that a spray-on product called "Lift Off" to be highly effective in
removing oil residue; after spraying, it wiped off with a paper
towel. *The active ingredient appears to be "Xylol", and is mainly
marketed towards removing stickers and such. *My own can is over 10
years old, so I don't know if the brand is still made any more, but
surely some other similar spray uses the same chemical. *(WD-40 is not
effective.)


The best one I've found for removing baked-on residue is called
"Sokoff."

N.


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Old 15-02-2008, 09:54 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Removing Baked-on Oil from Pans

On Feb 14, 8:47 pm, Greg Esres wrote:
In researching the archives for how to clean oil from aluminum pans, I
found the advice mainly consisted of "elbow grease". However, I found
that a spray-on product called "Lift Off" to be highly effective in
removing oil residue; after spraying, it wiped off with a paper
towel. The active ingredient appears to be "Xylol", and is mainly
marketed towards removing stickers and such. My own can is over 10
years old, so I don't know if the brand is still made any more, but
surely some other similar spray uses the same chemical. (WD-40 is not
effective.)


Sheldon/Penmart had a good useful method. Take a large plastic
garbage bag, put the pan in the bag, add a splash or three of ammonia,
tie the bag shut and leave it overnight (preferrably somewhere
outside) The next day, take the pan out of the bag, rinse it off with
the hose, and then a light scrubbing should get rid of anything that's
still on it.

maxine in ri
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Old 15-02-2008, 10:20 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Removing Baked-on Oil from Pans

On Fri 15 Feb 2008 02:54:23p, maxine in ri told us...

On Feb 14, 8:47 pm, Greg Esres wrote:
In researching the archives for how to clean oil from aluminum pans, I
found the advice mainly consisted of "elbow grease". However, I found
that a spray-on product called "Lift Off" to be highly effective in
removing oil residue; after spraying, it wiped off with a paper
towel. The active ingredient appears to be "Xylol", and is mainly
marketed towards removing stickers and such. My own can is over 10
years old, so I don't know if the brand is still made any more, but
surely some other similar spray uses the same chemical. (WD-40 is not
effective.)


Sheldon/Penmart had a good useful method. Take a large plastic
garbage bag, put the pan in the bag, add a splash or three of ammonia,
tie the bag shut and leave it overnight (preferrably somewhere
outside) The next day, take the pan out of the bag, rinse it off with
the hose, and then a light scrubbing should get rid of anything that's
still on it.

maxine in ri


If the pan is aluminum it will be totally ruined. Stainless steel works
okay.

--
Wayne Boatwright

*******************************************
Date: Friday, 02(II)/15(XV)/08(MMVIII)
*******************************************
Acting without thinking can be awfully
entertaining.
*******************************************



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Old 15-02-2008, 10:30 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Removing Baked-on Oil from Pans

Wayne Boatwright wrote:
On Fri 15 Feb 2008 02:54:23p, maxine in ri told us...

On Feb 14, 8:47 pm, Greg Esres wrote:
In researching the archives for how to clean oil from aluminum pans, I
found the advice mainly consisted of "elbow grease". However, I found
that a spray-on product called "Lift Off" to be highly effective in
removing oil residue; after spraying, it wiped off with a paper
towel. The active ingredient appears to be "Xylol", and is mainly
marketed towards removing stickers and such. My own can is over 10
years old, so I don't know if the brand is still made any more, but
surely some other similar spray uses the same chemical. (WD-40 is not
effective.)

Sheldon/Penmart had a good useful method. Take a large plastic
garbage bag, put the pan in the bag, add a splash or three of ammonia,
tie the bag shut and leave it overnight (preferrably somewhere
outside) The next day, take the pan out of the bag, rinse it off with
the hose, and then a light scrubbing should get rid of anything that's
still on it.

maxine in ri


If the pan is aluminum it will be totally ruined. Stainless steel works
okay.

Following some of the hints on here today I just cleaned baked on oil
off an enameled bake pan with Goo Begone today. Don't remember who
posted that hint but many thanks for making a job I don't like anyway
lots easier.

George
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Old 15-02-2008, 10:32 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Removing Baked-on Oil from Pans

On Feb 15, 4:54�pm, maxine in ri wrote:
On Feb 14, 8:47 pm, Greg Esres wrote:

In researching the archives for how to clean oil from aluminum pans, I
found the advice mainly consisted of "elbow grease". �However, I found
that a spray-on product called "Lift Off" to be highly effective in
removing oil residue; after spraying, it wiped off with a paper
towel. �The active ingredient appears to be "Xylol", and is mainly
marketed towards removing stickers and such. �My own can is over 10
years old, so I don't know if the brand is still made any more, but
surely some other similar spray uses the same chemical. �(WD-40 is not
effective.)


Sheldon/Penmart had a good useful method. �Take a large plastic
garbage bag, put the pan in the bag, add a splash or three of ammonia,
tie the bag shut and leave it overnight (preferrably somewhere
outside) �The next day, take the pan out of the bag, rinse it off with
the hose, and then a light scrubbing should get rid of anything that's
still on it.

maxine in ri


Not for aluminum.
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Old 16-02-2008, 02:19 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Removing Baked-on Oil from Pans

On Fri, 15 Feb 2008 20:04:39 -0600, Sqwertz
wrote:

On Fri, 15 Feb 2008 13:54:23 -0800 (PST), maxine in ri wrote:

On Feb 14, 8:47 pm, Greg Esres wrote:
In researching the archives for how to clean oil from aluminum pans, I
found the advice mainly consisted of "elbow grease". However, I found
that a spray-on product called "Lift Off" to be highly effective in
removing oil residue; after spraying, it wiped off with a paper
towel. The active ingredient appears to be "Xylol", and is mainly
marketed towards removing stickers and such. My own can is over 10
years old, so I don't know if the brand is still made any more, but
surely some other similar spray uses the same chemical. (WD-40 is not
effective.)


Sheldon/Penmart had a good useful method. Take a large plastic
garbage bag, put the pan in the bag, add a splash or three of ammonia,
tie the bag shut and leave it overnight (preferrably somewhere
outside) The next day, take the pan out of the bag, rinse it off with
the hose, and then a light scrubbing should get rid of anything that's
still on it.


And the last person who tried that a couple weeks ago reported
back that it did nothing at all. Which doesn't surprise me.

-sw


Howdy,

I was the OP on the recent thread about the baked-on oil,
and indeed, the ammonia method did nothing to solve the
problem.

I have had excellent results with the ammonia when the stuff
on the pan was still slightly soft.

In the situation I had described, the oil had baked into a
hard, varnish-like mass.

I did solve the problem with a product called "Carbon Off"
(which I believe to be the same thing as "Sokoff.")

All the best,
--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."


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Old 16-02-2008, 02:38 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Removing Baked-on Oil from Pans

On Fri, 15 Feb 2008 22:20:19 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
wrote:

On Fri 15 Feb 2008 02:54:23p, maxine in ri told us...

On Feb 14, 8:47 pm, Greg Esres wrote:
In researching the archives for how to clean oil from aluminum pans, I
found the advice mainly consisted of "elbow grease". However, I found
that a spray-on product called "Lift Off" to be highly effective in
removing oil residue; after spraying, it wiped off with a paper
towel. The active ingredient appears to be "Xylol", and is mainly
marketed towards removing stickers and such. My own can is over 10
years old, so I don't know if the brand is still made any more, but
surely some other similar spray uses the same chemical. (WD-40 is not
effective.)


Sheldon/Penmart had a good useful method. Take a large plastic
garbage bag, put the pan in the bag, add a splash or three of ammonia,
tie the bag shut and leave it overnight (preferrably somewhere
outside) The next day, take the pan out of the bag, rinse it off with
the hose, and then a light scrubbing should get rid of anything that's
still on it.

maxine in ri


If the pan is aluminum it will be totally ruined. Stainless steel works
okay.


Hi Wayne,

Sheldon also claims that ammonia will harm aluminum, but
based on everything I can find on the net (together with my
own experience) that is false.

In fact, aluminum tubing is used to convey ammonia
(including heated, and under pressure) in all sorts of
industrial applications.

I posted that information in the earlier thread about this
cleanup issue.

All the best,
--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
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Old 16-02-2008, 02:49 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Removing Baked-on Oil from Pans

On Fri, 15 Feb 2008 14:32:46 -0800 (PST), Sheldon
wrote:
Sheldon/Penmart had a good useful method. ?Take a large plastic
garbage bag, put the pan in the bag, add a splash or three of ammonia,
tie the bag shut and leave it overnight (preferrably somewhere
outside) ?The next day, take the pan out of the bag, rinse it off with
the hose, and then a light scrubbing should get rid of anything that's
still on it.

maxine in ri


Not for aluminum.


Hi Sheldon,

You keep saying that there is some problem using the ammonia
technique on aluminum.

The first time I read that, I was curious, and so checked it
out with some care.

In fact, aluminum is used in contact with ammonia in all
sorts of industrial applications (most relating to
refrigeration) precisely because it is not harmed as would
be certain other metals.

It is obvious (both from my reading, and from my own
reasonably extensive experience) that there is no problem
whatever using the ammonia technique on aluminum cookware.

All the best,



--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
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Old 16-02-2008, 04:15 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Removing Baked-on Oil from Pans


"Greg Esres" wrote in message
...
In researching the archives for how to clean oil from aluminum pans, I
found the advice mainly consisted of "elbow grease". However, I found
that a spray-on product called "Lift Off" to be highly effective in
removing oil residue; after spraying, it wiped off with a paper
towel. The active ingredient appears to be "Xylol", and is mainly
marketed towards removing stickers and such. My own can is over 10
years old, so I don't know if the brand is still made any more, but
surely some other similar spray uses the same chemical. (WD-40 is not
effective.)


Xylol is a paint thinner/solvent. I believe I've seen it at Menard's,
recently.

Dave


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Old 16-02-2008, 01:05 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Removing Baked-on Oil from Pans

Hairy wrote on Fri, 15 Feb 2008 22:15:20 -0600:


H "Greg Esres" wrote in message
H
...
?? In researching the archives for how to clean oil from
?? aluminum pans, I found the advice mainly consisted of
?? "elbow grease". However, I found that a spray-on product
?? called "Lift Off" to be highly effective in removing oil
?? residue; after spraying, it wiped off with a paper towel.
?? The active ingredient appears to be "Xylol", and is mainly
?? marketed towards removing stickers and such. My own can
?? is over 10 years old, so I don't know if the brand is
?? still made any more, but surely some other similar spray
?? uses the same chemical. (WD-40 is not effective.)

H Xylol is a paint thinner/solvent. I believe I've seen it at
H Menard's, recently.

I was a little concerned about xylol (old name, more correctly
xylene) since it is closely related chemically to benzene.
Fortunately, tho' I wouldn't use it without proper ventilation,
it does not appear to be a carcinogen.

James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland

E-mail, with obvious alterations:
not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not

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Old 16-02-2008, 01:10 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Removing Baked-on Oil from Pans

On Feb 15, 5:20 pm, Wayne Boatwright
wrote:
On Fri 15 Feb 2008 02:54:23p, maxine in ri told us...



On Feb 14, 8:47 pm, Greg Esres wrote:
In researching the archives for how to clean oil from aluminum pans, I
found the advice mainly consisted of "elbow grease". However, I found
that a spray-on product called "Lift Off" to be highly effective in
removing oil residue; after spraying, it wiped off with a paper
towel. The active ingredient appears to be "Xylol", and is mainly
marketed towards removing stickers and such. My own can is over 10
years old, so I don't know if the brand is still made any more, but
surely some other similar spray uses the same chemical. (WD-40 is not
effective.)


Sheldon/Penmart had a good useful method. Take a large plastic
garbage bag, put the pan in the bag, add a splash or three of ammonia,
tie the bag shut and leave it overnight (preferrably somewhere
outside) The next day, take the pan out of the bag, rinse it off with
the hose, and then a light scrubbing should get rid of anything that's
still on it.


maxine in ri


If the pan is aluminum it will be totally ruined. Stainless steel works
okay.

Wayne Boatwright

Thanks for the correction. I didn't realize aluminum wouldn't work.

maxine


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