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Old 03-07-2007, 09:26 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default storing fresh corn

if you buy corn on the cob and circumstances dictate that you can't
cook it until the next day, should you refrigerate it or leave it out?
does cold accelerate the sugar to starch process, or slow it down?

thanks.

your pal,
blake

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Old 03-07-2007, 09:42 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default storing fresh corn

On Jul 3, 4:26?pm, blake murphy wrote:
if you buy corn on the cob and circumstances dictate that you can't
cook it until the next day, should you refrigerate it or leave it out?
does cold accelerate the sugar to starch process, or slow it down?


Ears of corn should be cooked immediately but can be stored in their
husk in the fridge up to one day. If you need to store corn longer
then one day cook it right away, place in large zip-locs and
refrigerate... can be reheated in simmering water (do not boil).
Ideally corn should be cooked as soon as possible after harvesting, no
more than a few hours... naturally any corn from the stupidmarket is
already way too old, so cook/store however, matters not a whit.

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Old 03-07-2007, 09:44 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default storing fresh corn

blake murphy wrote:

if you buy corn on the cob and circumstances dictate that you can't
cook it until the next day, should you refrigerate it or leave it out?
does cold accelerate the sugar to starch process, or slow it down?


Good question. I never have to worry about it. When I want corn on the cob
I hop on my bicycle and ride around the corner to the fruit and vegetable
stand and buy 2 or 3 cobs and they go on the grill within an hour.
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Old 03-07-2007, 09:50 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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"blake murphy" wrote in message
...
if you buy corn on the cob and circumstances dictate that you can't
cook it until the next day, should you refrigerate it or leave it out?
does cold accelerate the sugar to starch process, or slow it down?

thanks.

your pal,
blake



All chemical processes are slowed at lower temperatures. Refrigerate it in a
plastic bag.


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Old 03-07-2007, 10:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default storing fresh corn

On Jul 3, 4:26 pm, blake murphy wrote:
if you buy corn on the cob and circumstances dictate that you can't
cook it until the next day, should you refrigerate it or leave it out?
does cold accelerate the sugar to starch process, or slow it down?

thanks.

your pal,
blake


actually, if you keep the corn in the husks and retain in the bag you
purchased it in (or similiar bag), the moisture created in the 'fridge
(particulary the crisper) will create a moist environment (as
everything in nature basically consists of water) which stops the corn
from drying out - it should keep it fresh for at least four or five
days. by the way does anyone have a recipe for Eccles cakes?



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Old 03-07-2007, 10:14 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default storing fresh corn

On Jul 3, 5:06?pm, mary wrote:
On Jul 3, 4:26 pm, blake murphy wrote:

if you buy corn on the cob and circumstances dictate that you can't
cook it until the next day, should you refrigerate it or leave it out?
does cold accelerate the sugar to starch process, or slow it down?


thanks.


your pal,
blake


actually, if you keep the corn in the husks and retain in the bag you
purchased it in (or similiar bag), the moisture created in the 'fridge
(particulary the crisper) will create a moist environment (as
everything in nature basically consists of water) which stops the corn
from drying out - it should keep it fresh for at least four or five
days. by the way does anyone have a recipe for Eccles cakes?


Actually the extra moisture will cause the corn to ferment, it should
not be stored in a sealed plastic bag... once corn is harvested it
ceases to be a living plant, like say a carrot. If you've ever
noticed, carrots in teh stupidmarkt are usually in plastic bags, corn
is useally in it's husk in an open crate.

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Old 03-07-2007, 10:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default storing fresh corn

On Jul 3, 4:50?pm, "JoeSpareBedroom" wrote:
"blake murphy" wrote in message

...

if you buy corn on the cob and circumstances dictate that you can't
cook it until the next day, should you refrigerate it or leave it out?
does cold accelerate the sugar to starch process, or slow it down?


thanks.


your pal,
blake


All chemical processes are slowed at lower temperatures. Refrigerate it in a
plastic bag.


That's not necessarilly true with plants... with potatoes their starch
turns to sugar faster under refrigeration.


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Old 03-07-2007, 10:20 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default storing fresh corn

"Sheldon" wrote in message
oups.com...
On Jul 3, 4:50?pm, "JoeSpareBedroom" wrote:
"blake murphy" wrote in message

...

if you buy corn on the cob and circumstances dictate that you can't
cook it until the next day, should you refrigerate it or leave it out?
does cold accelerate the sugar to starch process, or slow it down?


thanks.


your pal,
blake


All chemical processes are slowed at lower temperatures. Refrigerate it
in a
plastic bag.


That's not necessarilly true with plants... with potatoes their starch
turns to sugar faster under refrigeration.



True, but I bought corn two days ago, used some, and refrigerated the rest
until yesterday. It tasted the same. Tonight's final serving will probably
taste just as good. Three days is my limit, not because of any systematic
method other than that's how often I shop.


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Old 03-07-2007, 10:21 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default storing fresh corn

On Jul 3, 5:06 pm, mary wrote:
On Jul 3, 4:26 pm, blake murphy wrote:

if you buy corn on the cob and circumstances dictate that you can't
cook it until the next day, should you refrigerate it or leave it out?
does cold accelerate the sugar to starch process, or slow it down?


thanks.


your pal,
blake


actually, if you keep the corn in the husks and retain in the bag you
purchased it in (or similiar bag), the moisture created in the 'fridge
(particulary the crisper) will create a moist environment (as
everything in nature basically consists of water) which stops the corn
from drying out - it should keep it fresh for at least four or five
days. by the way does anyone have a recipe for Eccles cakes?


no, it takes rather a long while to break the starch down to sugar -
veggies are living plants, and require water - if you keep the husks
on, the plants draw the moisture out slowly - probably at a rate
whereby their cellular material is maintained, but not enough to
ferment the sugars, i.e. create an environment for bacteria and
fungi. just like chemistry: try it and see.

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Old 03-07-2007, 10:53 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default storing fresh corn

blake murphy wrote:
if you buy corn on the cob and circumstances dictate that you can't
cook it until the next day, should you refrigerate it or leave it out?
does cold accelerate the sugar to starch process, or slow it down?

thanks.

your pal,
blake


Blanching would actually give the best result because it would stop the
enzymatic reaction. Refrigeration would be next best because it would
slow it.


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Old 04-07-2007, 04:20 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default storing fresh corn

In article ,
blake murphy wrote:

if you buy corn on the cob and circumstances dictate that you can't
cook it until the next day, should you refrigerate it or leave it out?
does cold accelerate the sugar to starch process, or slow it down?

thanks.

your pal,
blake


I've just always refrigerated it. Works for me for a max of about 5 days
before the quality begins to noticeably change.
--
Peace, Om

Remove _ to validate e-mails.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch" -- Jack Nicholson
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Old 04-07-2007, 05:21 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default storing fresh corn

On Wed, 04 Jul 2007 10:20:49 -0500, Omelet
wrote:

In article ,
blake murphy wrote:

if you buy corn on the cob and circumstances dictate that you can't
cook it until the next day, should you refrigerate it or leave it out?
does cold accelerate the sugar to starch process, or slow it down?

thanks.

your pal,
blake


I've just always refrigerated it. Works for me for a max of about 5 days
before the quality begins to noticeably change.


thanks, om and others. that's what i've done in the past, but i never
really thought about it.

your pal,
blake
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Old 04-07-2007, 06:26 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default storing fresh corn

Omelet wrote:

In article ,
blake murphy wrote:

if you buy corn on the cob and circumstances dictate that you can't
cook it until the next day, should you refrigerate it or leave it out?
does cold accelerate the sugar to starch process, or slow it down?

thanks.

your pal,
blake


I've just always refrigerated it. Works for me for a max of about 5 days
before the quality begins to noticeably change.
--
Peace, Om


For raw, unhusked corn, I just refrigerate in veggie drawer for a couple
of days at most in a loose kitchen towel that's been slightly
moistened. My problem is

I've read in many places that it's recommended to blanch the corn before
freezing it. I've tried that and freezing plain, raw corn, too. I
found I prefer freezing the plain-raw corn instead because I've noticed
that blanching seems to do something to the texture. I'll try again
this year to verify my memory.

Hmmm, I wonder if freezing corn-on-the-cob in its husk is a good idea??
I've never done that before. I'd use a vacuum-sealed bag if I did.

Sky
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Old 04-07-2007, 06:33 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default storing fresh corn

"Skyhooks" wrote in message
...
Omelet wrote:

In article ,
blake murphy wrote:

if you buy corn on the cob and circumstances dictate that you can't
cook it until the next day, should you refrigerate it or leave it out?
does cold accelerate the sugar to starch process, or slow it down?

thanks.

your pal,
blake


I've just always refrigerated it. Works for me for a max of about 5 days
before the quality begins to noticeably change.
--
Peace, Om


For raw, unhusked corn, I just refrigerate in veggie drawer for a couple
of days at most in a loose kitchen towel that's been slightly
moistened. My problem is

I've read in many places that it's recommended to blanch the corn before
freezing it. I've tried that and freezing plain, raw corn, too. I
found I prefer freezing the plain-raw corn instead because I've noticed
that blanching seems to do something to the texture. I'll try again
this year to verify my memory.

Hmmm, I wonder if freezing corn-on-the-cob in its husk is a good idea??
I've never done that before. I'd use a vacuum-sealed bag if I did.

Sky


Why wonder? If it was a good idea, Green Giant would do it that way. But,
they don't.


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Old 04-07-2007, 06:42 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default storing fresh corn

In article ,
blake murphy wrote:

if you buy corn on the cob and circumstances dictate that you can't
cook it until the next day, should you refrigerate it or leave it out?
does cold accelerate the sugar to starch process, or slow it down?

thanks.

your pal,
blake


Refrigerate it. Absolutely.
--
-Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com - story and
pics of Ronald McDonald House dinner posted 6-24-2007


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