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Old 27-07-2013, 03:26 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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On 07/26/2013 06:19 PM, W. Baker wrote:
Todd wrote:
snip interestin gardening advice

: I have a HUGE club sized Zuke
incubating. Plan
: on cooking it Sunday. Should fill my entire saute
: pan.

: I wonder how much longer these dumb-dumb plants are
: going to buy my cock-'n-bull story about taking
: their offspring for a drive in the country and
: figure out what I am REALLY doing with them.

: I am babbling.

: -T

: WHAT? Plants don't talk. Oh please! :-)

Do you realy like those giant zuchinni? most prefer the small ones and
have the giants oly because they kind of got away form them. If I get a
giant, I always stuff it king of like a stuffed canal boat, as it tastes
better that way. when Ibuy, I always go for the small yong ones. they
taste beter in all the simple day to day preparations like microwaving,
grillingas halved sliced lengthwise.

Just my view on these vegetables.

Wendy


Hi Wendy,

From the store, ABSOLUTELY! The big ones are also
more bitter and really tough.

But, these are not store varieties. These are an
heirloom Costa Romaneco:

http://www.rareseeds.com/costata-romanesco-/

And, they are 20 minutes to the pan. They have not had a
chance to sit around and dehydrate.

I am really tickled because I can let them grow bigger and
get a lot more food out of them, they are as tender big
as small, and they are not bitter!

According to my CSA farmer, if I let them, they will
grow four feet long. Then they are a problem. (The
plant will go to seed too, as it will think it has
done its job.)

If you live in a long growing season (I don't), Rareseeds,
told me a trick to out witting squash bugs, is to plant
them late in the season. If you live in one of these
areas, you still have time. All you need is a dirt pot
and some organic soil and compost. Plus not too much water
and a bit of love.

You can try talking to them, like I do, but I am suspicious
that their response might be the wind. :-)

-T



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Old 27-07-2013, 04:27 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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On 07/26/2013 07:26 PM, Todd wrote:

But, these are not store varieties. These are an
heirloom Costa Romaneco:

http://www.rareseeds.com/costata-romanesco-/


This is what caught my attention on the rareseeds web site.
From one of the reviews:

The large squash are sweet and firm. The flesh does
not get watery or bitter even when they are a foot
and a half long. I use the large ones in all the
same ways I use the small ones with no sacrifice of
flavor or texture. In addition, the large ones can
be sliced easily for grilling (and they are delicious
this way)
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Old 27-07-2013, 05:52 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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On Sat, 27 Jul 2013 01:19:58 +0000 (UTC), in alt.food.diabetic, "W.
Baker" wrote:

Todd wrote:
snip interestin gardening advice

: I have a HUGE club sized Zuke
incubating. Plan
: on cooking it Sunday. Should fill my entire saute
: pan.

: I wonder how much longer these dumb-dumb plants are
: going to buy my cock-'n-bull story about taking
: their offspring for a drive in the country and
: figure out what I am REALLY doing with them.

: I am babbling.

: -T

: WHAT? Plants don't talk. Oh please! :-)

Do you realy like those giant zuchinni? most prefer the small ones and
have the giants oly because they kind of got away form them. If I get a
giant, I always stuff it king of like a stuffed canal boat, as it tastes
better that way. when Ibuy, I always go for the small yong ones. they
taste beter in all the simple day to day preparations like microwaving,
grillingas halved sliced lengthwise.

Just my view on these vegetables.

Wendy


I like smaller zucchini too, Wendy. I think they are more tender. We
have a plot in the local community garden. We got a late start on our
plot, and the one we picked had a volunteer zucchini plant already
growing. It is a lebanese zucchini. It is yellow and green speckles.
It seems to get big quite fast. It does taste the same as the other
zucchini. I have been blanching and freezing the excess.

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Old 27-07-2013, 07:09 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Posts: 44,256
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"W. Baker" wrote in message
...
Todd wrote:
snip interestin gardening advice

: I have a HUGE club sized Zuke
incubating. Plan
: on cooking it Sunday. Should fill my entire saute
: pan.

: I wonder how much longer these dumb-dumb plants are
: going to buy my cock-'n-bull story about taking
: their offspring for a drive in the country and
: figure out what I am REALLY doing with them.

: I am babbling.

: -T

: WHAT? Plants don't talk. Oh please! :-)

Do you realy like those giant zuchinni? most prefer the small ones and
have the giants oly because they kind of got away form them. If I get a
giant, I always stuff it king of like a stuffed canal boat, as it tastes
better that way. when Ibuy, I always go for the small yong ones. they
taste beter in all the simple day to day preparations like microwaving,
grillingas halved sliced lengthwise.

Just my view on these vegetables.


I don't think the giant ones are very flavorful, even though zucchini in and
of itself really isn't very flavorful. I used to be gifted with giant ones
all the time when I worked in the Garden Shop. I would just grate them and
make them into zucchini bread which I mostly gave away.


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Old 27-07-2013, 07:14 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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On 07/26/2013 09:52 PM, Karen wrote:
I have been blanching and freezing the excess.


Hi Karen,

Okay, with my "Black Thumb" this may be wishful thinking
that I would have enough to freeze, but how do you do
this? Do you have a link with directions?

-T


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Old 27-07-2013, 07:14 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Posts: 44,256
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"Todd" wrote in message
...
On 07/26/2013 06:19 PM, W. Baker wrote:
Todd wrote:
snip interestin gardening advice

: I have a HUGE club sized Zuke
incubating. Plan
: on cooking it Sunday. Should fill my entire saute
: pan.

: I wonder how much longer these dumb-dumb plants are
: going to buy my cock-'n-bull story about taking
: their offspring for a drive in the country and
: figure out what I am REALLY doing with them.

: I am babbling.

: -T

: WHAT? Plants don't talk. Oh please! :-)

Do you realy like those giant zuchinni? most prefer the small ones and
have the giants oly because they kind of got away form them. If I get a
giant, I always stuff it king of like a stuffed canal boat, as it tastes
better that way. when Ibuy, I always go for the small yong ones. they
taste beter in all the simple day to day preparations like microwaving,
grillingas halved sliced lengthwise.

Just my view on these vegetables.

Wendy


Hi Wendy,

From the store, ABSOLUTELY! The big ones are also
more bitter and really tough.

But, these are not store varieties. These are an
heirloom Costa Romaneco:

http://www.rareseeds.com/costata-romanesco-/

And, they are 20 minutes to the pan. They have not had a
chance to sit around and dehydrate.

I am really tickled because I can let them grow bigger and
get a lot more food out of them, they are as tender big
as small, and they are not bitter!

According to my CSA farmer, if I let them, they will
grow four feet long. Then they are a problem. (The
plant will go to seed too, as it will think it has
done its job.)

If you live in a long growing season (I don't), Rareseeds,
told me a trick to out witting squash bugs, is to plant
them late in the season. If you live in one of these
areas, you still have time. All you need is a dirt pot
and some organic soil and compost. Plus not too much water
and a bit of love.

You can try talking to them, like I do, but I am suspicious
that their response might be the wind. :-)


Talking to plants actually does work as does playing music to them. This
was an experiment that we did in biology class. We hooked some sort of
meter to the plants and judged their reaction. When we said nice things
like, "I love you plant!" Or, "I'm going to water you now." Or, "You're
getting some food!" Or, "I'm going to clean you leaves!" And then of
course doing the appropriate action. Or played nice music, the meter
indicated a nice reaction.

But when we played really loud, jangly rock music, shouted at them or did
mean things like burn them with a cigarette lighter, the needle on the meter
went wild. And it didn't take long for the plant to respond to our voice.
The plant knew what we meant when we said we were going to burn it. After
burning it a few times, all we had to do was tell it that we were going to
burn it and the needle went wild. We really only did burn it a few times.
But after doing that, all we had to do was threaten to burn it and it would
freak.


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Old 27-07-2013, 07:34 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Posts: 168
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In article , Todd
wrote:

On 07/22/2013 11:39 PM, Billy wrote:
Cut back on the water to the tomatoes, and they will taste even better.


Hi Billy,

Lets see:
Diabetics: food is involved, so check.
Food: tomateos and zukes are food, so check again
Alt: I am a bit (only a bit!) weird, so three checks.
Therefore, I pass the on topic test.

You are not the first one to tell me this about the water.
Thank you.


Chez Panisse founder Alice Waters is a fan of the Early Girl tomato,
telling an interviewer "[O]ne of the best tomatoes Iıve ever had was an
Early Girl that was dry-farmed up in Napa at a friendıs house."

I am even worse at gardening than I am at cooking. I
have had yield problems for the past three years
and the ones I did get, tasted mushy.

I finally figured out who to talk to. It is the
farmers at the CSA farm. Duh! Not nursery operators.

What they told me is this. My pot needs to have drainage.
It does. Tomatoes are an Amazon vine. The get their butts
DRENCHED every day like clock work. Something like 12 inches
worth. The trick is that the roots can't stay wet all
day (drainage). Next, liberally fertilize with organic
compost and amendment (fish head fertilizer). It must
be organic, as organic fertilizers can not burn your
plants if you overdue it. (What? Me overdue it? NEVER!)


Cultivated tomatoes originated as wild forms in the Peru-Ecuador-Bolivia
area of the Andes.

You can kill plants with chicken, or rabbit manure, as well as alfalfa
powder.

Farmers will drench their tomatoes, because it adds weight. It also
dilutes the flavor, so beware hot house tomatoes, and farmers who over
water.

Too little water and my flowers turn brown and fall off.
No fruit. I made this mistake in a grand fashion. We
have adiabatic drying winds (means the wind sucks all
the water out of everything) here in the high desert,
so watering takes on a whole different dimension.


Yes, they aren't drought resistant. Once they flower, cut back on the
water, and no more nitrogen.

Last year, when I finally got it right, I had a huge
crop, but it froze two weeks later. S---!


Welcome to agriculture.

This year, I am using their plants and following their
recommendations to the "T". I already have a huge crop
of green ones. Looks like I and going to have about
15 ripe ones by Sunday (the day I usually pick).
One of the plants has yet to produce any fruit. It
got drenched in fish head fertilizer yesterday, as
per recommendation.


2 Tbls/ gallon


So far, so good. The six I picked last week made
my wife and my eyes roll in out heads. She said
they actually tasted better than the CSA farm.
Now that is a FIRST!


It's not rocket science.

I have a HUGE club sized Zuke incubating. Plan
on cooking it Sunday. Should fill my entire saute
pan.

I wonder how much longer these dumb-dumb plants are
going to buy my cock-'n-bull story about taking
their offspring for a drive in the country and
figure out what I am REALLY doing with them.


Eat them small, and stop terrorizing your neighbors.

I am babbling.


Have another glass ;O)

-T

WHAT? Plants don't talk. Oh please! :-)


You might want a consultation, if they start telling you that you are
the illegitimate son of the Emperor of the Universe, and that there are
assassins, which look like your neighbors, who are after you. In which
case you may want to commit yourself, or reconsider terrorizing your
neighbors with your zuchs, which look like the cocoon of an Antares
Dragon Wasp, their natural predator.
--
Palestinian Child Detained
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzSzH38jYcg

Remember Rachel Corrie
http://www.rachelcorrie.org/

Welcome to the New America.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hA736oK9FPg
  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-07-2013, 07:57 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 720
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On 07/26/2013 11:34 PM, Billy wrote:
In article , Todd
wrote:

On 07/22/2013 11:39 PM, Billy wrote:
Cut back on the water to the tomatoes, and they will taste even better.


Hi Billy,

Lets see:
Diabetics: food is involved, so check.
Food: tomateos and zukes are food, so check again
Alt: I am a bit (only a bit!) weird, so three checks.
Therefore, I pass the on topic test.

You are not the first one to tell me this about the water.
Thank you.


Chez Panisse founder Alice Waters is a fan of the Early Girl tomato,
telling an interviewer "[O]ne of the best tomatoes Iıve ever had was an
Early Girl that was dry-farmed up in Napa at a friendıs house."

I am even worse at gardening than I am at cooking. I
have had yield problems for the past three years
and the ones I did get, tasted mushy.

I finally figured out who to talk to. It is the
farmers at the CSA farm. Duh! Not nursery operators.

What they told me is this. My pot needs to have drainage.
It does. Tomatoes are an Amazon vine. The get their butts
DRENCHED every day like clock work. Something like 12 inches
worth. The trick is that the roots can't stay wet all
day (drainage). Next, liberally fertilize with organic
compost and amendment (fish head fertilizer). It must
be organic, as organic fertilizers can not burn your
plants if you overdue it. (What? Me overdue it? NEVER!)


Cultivated tomatoes originated as wild forms in the Peru-Ecuador-Bolivia
area of the Andes.

You can kill plants with chicken, or rabbit manure, as well as alfalfa
powder.


I will be careful. I don't use anything the CSA farmer hasn't
told me too.


Farmers will drench their tomatoes, because it adds weight. It also
dilutes the flavor, so beware hot house tomatoes, and farmers who over
water.

Too little water and my flowers turn brown and fall off.
No fruit. I made this mistake in a grand fashion. We
have adiabatic drying winds (means the wind sucks all
the water out of everything) here in the high desert,
so watering takes on a whole different dimension.


Yes, they aren't drought resistant. Once they flower, cut back on the
water, and no more nitrogen.


Hmmmm. Last year, the CSA farmer had me add their bat poop
and worm casing compost/amendment and a lot of water,
then I got my two week bumper crop. Frustrating, before
that, the plants grew like hell, lots of flowers, but
very, very little fruit.



Last year, when I finally got it right, I had a huge
crop, but it froze two weeks later. S---!


Welcome to agriculture.


I really respect what real farmers have to go through.
A combination of high tech and time honored, old
fashioned methods. And one hail storm ...

The local CSA farm has added two Franken Carp (that is
gold fish to non-trout fisherman) ponds to the mix.
They swim, eat, and poop. Then the poop water gets
sprayed on the crops, along with chicken poop from
their local flock of egg laying ladies. Tubes and
hoses everywhere. You have got to marvel at the
ingenuity/technology.

This year, I am using their plants and following their
recommendations to the "T". I already have a huge crop
of green ones. Looks like I and going to have about
15 ripe ones by Sunday (the day I usually pick).
One of the plants has yet to produce any fruit. It
got drenched in fish head fertilizer yesterday, as
per recommendation.


2 Tbls/ gallon


I have a gallon jug I fill up with water, then guess
at 2 Tablespoons. I wear tossable rubber gloves to
keep the stink off.



So far, so good. The six I picked last week made
my wife and my eyes roll in out heads. She said
they actually tasted better than the CSA farm.
Now that is a FIRST!


It's not rocket science.


You have never had a black thumb. Yes it is.

I have a HUGE club sized Zuke incubating. Plan
on cooking it Sunday. Should fill my entire saute
pan.

I wonder how much longer these dumb-dumb plants are
going to buy my cock-'n-bull story about taking
their offspring for a drive in the country and
figure out what I am REALLY doing with them.


Eat them small, and stop terrorizing your neighbors.


Where is the fun in that! How did you know, by the way?


I am babbling.


Have another glass ;O)

-T

WHAT? Plants don't talk. Oh please! :-)


You might want a consultation, if they start telling you that you are
the illegitimate son of the Emperor of the Universe, and that there are
assassins, which look like your neighbors, who are after you. In which
case you may want to commit yourself, or reconsider terrorizing your
neighbors with your zuchs, which look like the cocoon of an Antares
Dragon Wasp, their natural predator.


They are not? :-)

Thank you!

-T

  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-07-2013, 08:03 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Posts: 720
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On 07/26/2013 11:34 PM, Billy wrote:
Chez Panisse founder Alice Waters is a fan of the Early Girl tomato,
telling an interviewer "[O]ne of the best tomatoes Iıve ever had was an
Early Girl that was dry-farmed up in Napa at a friendıs house."


I wonder how he got away with it. There is a lot of skill
involved in this stuff.

This year's tomatoes:
Sun Gold x2
Sweet 100
Unknown Cherry that I forgot
Better Boy
Black Prince
Ancho Gigantea (same family as tomatoes)

All on the recommendation of the CSA farmers. Their
plants too.
  #25 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-07-2013, 06:14 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 168
Default Zukes!

In article , Todd
wrote:

On 07/26/2013 11:34 PM, Billy wrote:
Chez Panisse founder Alice Waters is a fan of the Early Girl tomato,
telling an interviewer "[O]ne of the best tomatoes Iıve ever had was an
Early Girl that was dry-farmed up in Napa at a friendıs house."


I wonder how he got away with it. There is a lot of skill
involved in this stuff.

This year's tomatoes:
Sun Gold x2
Sweet 100
Unknown Cherry that I forgot
Better Boy
Black Prince
Ancho Gigantea (same family as tomatoes)


Families are important in crop rotation, but most people consider Ancho
Gigantea a pepper (Genus: Capsicum, species: annuum), as opposed to a
tomato (Genus: Solanum, species: lycopersicum,). Other members of the
Solanaceae Family, besides peppers, are potatoes, egg plant, Datura,
Mandragora (mandrake), and Atropa belladonna (deadly nightshade). The
last 3 should not be consumed.

Gardeners are mostly interested in Families for crop rotation, Species
for cross pollination (usually unimportant with tomatoes), and Cultivars
for specific color, size, or taste.

All on the recommendation of the CSA farmers. Their
plants too.


http://www.seedsavers.org/About-Us/
--
Palestinian Child Detained
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzSzH38jYcg

Remember Rachel Corrie
http://www.rachelcorrie.org/

Welcome to the New America.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hA736oK9FPg


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Old 27-07-2013, 06:15 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 117
Default Zukes!

On Fri, 26 Jul 2013 23:14:09 -0700, in alt.food.diabetic, Todd
wrote:

On 07/26/2013 09:52 PM, Karen wrote:
I have been blanching and freezing the excess.


Hi Karen,

Okay, with my "Black Thumb" this may be wishful thinking
that I would have enough to freeze, but how do you do
this? Do you have a link with directions?

-T


I don't have a link to that Todd. Sorry. I used directions in an old
Betty Crocker cookbook. It said to slice, then blanch the zucchini.
That is a process where you put the veggie in a pot of boiling for 2
or 3 minutes then quickly cool it down in a bowl of ice water. Drain
then put in containers to freeze. I am using a vacuum sealer so what
I do after draining is lay the slices on a cookie sheet and freeze
them that way. When they are frozen solid I bag them up and seal
them.

Okay, with sleuthing I came up with this:
http://www.pickyourown.org/pdfs/free...mer_squash.pdf

Hope this helps.
  #27 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-07-2013, 06:32 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 168
Default Zukes!

In article , Todd
wrote:

On 07/26/2013 11:34 PM, Billy wrote:
In article , Todd
wrote:

On 07/22/2013 11:39 PM, Billy wrote:
Cut back on the water to the tomatoes, and they will taste even better.

Hi Billy,

Lets see:
Diabetics: food is involved, so check.
Food: tomateos and zukes are food, so check again
Alt: I am a bit (only a bit!) weird, so three checks.
Therefore, I pass the on topic test.

You are not the first one to tell me this about the water.
Thank you.


Chez Panisse founder Alice Waters is a fan of the Early Girl tomato,
telling an interviewer "[O]ne of the best tomatoes Iıve ever had was an
Early Girl that was dry-farmed up in Napa at a friendıs house."

I am even worse at gardening than I am at cooking. I
have had yield problems for the past three years
and the ones I did get, tasted mushy.

I finally figured out who to talk to. It is the
farmers at the CSA farm. Duh! Not nursery operators.

What they told me is this. My pot needs to have drainage.
It does. Tomatoes are an Amazon vine. The get their butts
DRENCHED every day like clock work. Something like 12 inches
worth. The trick is that the roots can't stay wet all
day (drainage). Next, liberally fertilize with organic
compost and amendment (fish head fertilizer). It must
be organic, as organic fertilizers can not burn your
plants if you overdue it. (What? Me overdue it? NEVER!)


Cultivated tomatoes originated as wild forms in the Peru-Ecuador-Bolivia
area of the Andes.

You can kill plants with chicken, or rabbit manure, as well as alfalfa
powder.


I will be careful. I don't use anything the CSA farmer hasn't
told me too.


Farmers will drench their tomatoes, because it adds weight. It also
dilutes the flavor, so beware hot house tomatoes, and farmers who over
water.

Too little water and my flowers turn brown and fall off.
No fruit. I made this mistake in a grand fashion. We
have adiabatic drying winds (means the wind sucks all
the water out of everything) here in the high desert,
so watering takes on a whole different dimension.


Yes, they aren't drought resistant. Once they flower, cut back on the
water, and no more nitrogen.


Hmmmm. Last year, the CSA farmer had me add their bat poop
and worm casing compost/amendment and a lot of water,
then I got my two week bumper crop. Frustrating, before
that, the plants grew like hell, lots of flowers, but
very, very little fruit.


Excess water, and fertilizer tells your plant that it is an endless
summer, and that they can grow, and grow, because there is no rush.
Cutting back on fertilizer, and water tells the plants that summer is
coming to an end, and that it had better produce seed (fruit), if it
wants to survive.



Last year, when I finally got it right, I had a huge
crop, but it froze two weeks later. S---!


Welcome to agriculture.


I really respect what real farmers have to go through.
A combination of high tech and time honored, old
fashioned methods. And one hail storm ...

The local CSA farm has added two Franken Carp (that is
gold fish to non-trout fisherman) ponds to the mix.
They swim, eat, and poop. Then the poop water gets
sprayed on the crops, along with chicken poop from
their local flock of egg laying ladies. Tubes and
hoses everywhere. You have got to marvel at the
ingenuity/technology.


Franken Carp? Like Franken Food: GMO?

Irrigation reservoirs aren't very efficient (too much surface area), but
better than nothing.

This year, I am using their plants and following their
recommendations to the "T". I already have a huge crop
of green ones. Looks like I and going to have about
15 ripe ones by Sunday (the day I usually pick).
One of the plants has yet to produce any fruit. It
got drenched in fish head fertilizer yesterday, as
per recommendation.


2 Tbls/ gallon


I have a gallon jug I fill up with water, then guess
at 2 Tablespoons. I wear tossable rubber gloves to
keep the stink off.



So far, so good. The six I picked last week made
my wife and my eyes roll in out heads. She said
they actually tasted better than the CSA farm.
Now that is a FIRST!


It's not rocket science.


You have never had a black thumb. Yes it is.


Each plant has its own needs for soil, nutrients, sun, and temp. You
just need to get to know them better. Feed the soil, and the soil will
take care of the crop.


I have a HUGE club sized Zuke incubating. Plan
on cooking it Sunday. Should fill my entire saute
pan.

I wonder how much longer these dumb-dumb plants are
going to buy my cock-'n-bull story about taking
their offspring for a drive in the country and
figure out what I am REALLY doing with them.


Eat them small, and stop terrorizing your neighbors.


Where is the fun in that! How did you know, by the way?


It's that time of the year, when people start locking doors to their
homes, and vehicles, because they know that gardeners will be dumping
zuchs.


I am babbling.


Have another glass ;O)

-T

WHAT? Plants don't talk. Oh please! :-)


You might want a consultation, if they start telling you that you are
the illegitimate son of the Emperor of the Universe, and that there are
assassins, which look like your neighbors, who are after you. In which
case you may want to commit yourself, or reconsider terrorizing your
neighbors with your zuchs, which look like the cocoon of an Antares
Dragon Wasp, their natural predator.


They are not? :-)

Thank you!

-T

--
Palestinian Child Detained
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzSzH38jYcg

Remember Rachel Corrie
http://www.rachelcorrie.org/

Welcome to the New America.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hA736oK9FPg
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Old 27-07-2013, 06:35 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Zukes!

In article , Todd
wrote:

On 07/26/2013 09:52 PM, Karen wrote:
I have been blanching and freezing the excess.


Hi Karen,

Okay, with my "Black Thumb" this may be wishful thinking
that I would have enough to freeze, but how do you do
this? Do you have a link with directions?

-T


You can also just grate, and squeeze out the excess water. Divide into
useful amounts, bag, and freeze.
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Old 27-07-2013, 08:31 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Zukes!

Todd wrote:
:
: Yes, they aren't drought resistant. Once they flower, cut back on the
: water, and no more nitrogen.

: Hmmmm. Last year, the CSA farmer had me add their bat poop
: and worm casing compost/amendment and a lot of water,
: then I got my two week bumper crop. Frustrating, before
: that, the plants grew like hell, lots of flowers, but
: very, very little fruit.


Dint fertilize any more. too much and you get great plants with few
offspring.

Wendy
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Old 27-07-2013, 09:26 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Zukes!

"Julie Bove" wrote in message
...

"W. Baker" wrote in message
...
Todd wrote:
snip interestin gardening advice

: I have a HUGE club sized Zuke
incubating. Plan
: on cooking it Sunday. Should fill my entire saute
: pan.

: I wonder how much longer these dumb-dumb plants are
: going to buy my cock-'n-bull story about taking
: their offspring for a drive in the country and
: figure out what I am REALLY doing with them.

: I am babbling.

: -T

: WHAT? Plants don't talk. Oh please! :-)

Do you realy like those giant zuchinni? most prefer the small ones and
have the giants oly because they kind of got away form them. If I get a
giant, I always stuff it king of like a stuffed canal boat, as it tastes
better that way. when Ibuy, I always go for the small yong ones. they
taste beter in all the simple day to day preparations like microwaving,
grillingas halved sliced lengthwise.

Just my view on these vegetables.


I don't think the giant ones are very flavorful, even though zucchini in
and of itself really isn't very flavorful. I used to be gifted with giant
ones all the time when I worked in the Garden Shop. I would just grate
them and make them into zucchini bread which I mostly gave away.


I went to a local farmer co-op today where the woman was bringing fresh
picked zukes in, a couple were fairly large and I bought them. I roasted
them in the oven with some red peppers and the squash was really good.

Cheri



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