Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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Old 03-04-2006, 10:30 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Cherry coal producing factoid

I received a truckload of cherry wood from a friend last fall
(cut and split, he is a great guy!) and decided to use some this
past weekend. I've used cherry before for flavor, mixing in oak
for and lump for heat, but this is the first time I decided to
use cherry and lump only. It was a real struggle to keep the
Klose up to temp with just cherry logs. I was feeding a log
into to the fire chamber every 30 minutes, twice as often as
with oak or hickory.

I will continue to use cherry for flavoring, but will supliment
it with oak or hickory for heat.

FWIW

--
George B. Ross is
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a boy don't require the same set of skills? - anonymous

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Old 05-04-2006, 03:32 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Cherry coal producing factoid

Denny Wheeler wrote:

I'd be interested in Dave Bugg's input on this--I know he has, and
uses, cherry wood. (along with apple, maple, and other fruitwoods;
Wenatchee is kind of a major fruit-growing center)


Oak and hickory seem to produce higher btu than cherry and apple.

--
Dave
www.davebbq.com


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Old 05-04-2006, 02:16 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Cherry coal producing factoid

George B. Ross wrote:
I received a truckload of cherry wood from a friend last fall
(cut and split, he is a great guy!) and decided to use some this
past weekend. I've used cherry before for flavor, mixing in oak
for and lump for heat, but this is the first time I decided to
use cherry and lump only. It was a real struggle to keep the
Klose up to temp with just cherry logs. I was feeding a log
into to the fire chamber every 30 minutes, twice as often as
with oak or hickory.

I will continue to use cherry for flavoring, but will supliment
it with oak or hickory for heat.

FWIW

Hey George! Still living in Granger? Cherry isn't nearly as dense as oak
or hickory so it will burn up quicker. As far as flavor goes, I never
did find cherry by itself to be pleasant but when I mixed it with oak it
was a very good combo.

--
Regards,

Piedmont

The Practical Bar-B-Q'r at: http://web.infoave.net/~amwil/Index.htm

What difference does it make to the dead, the orphans and the homeless,
whether the mad destruction is wrought under the name of totalitarianism
or the holy name of liberty or democracy?

Mahatma Gandhi, "Non-Violence in Peace and War"














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Old 06-04-2006, 03:50 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Cherry coal producing factoid

Mike "Piedmont" ) opined:

George B. Ross wrote:
I received a truckload of cherry wood from a friend last
fall (cut and split, he is a great guy!) and decided to
use some this past weekend. I've used cherry before for
flavor, mixing in oak for and lump for heat, but this is
the first time I decided to use cherry and lump only. It
was a real struggle to keep the Klose up to temp with just
cherry logs. I was feeding a log into to the fire chamber
every 30 minutes, twice as often as with oak or hickory.

I will continue to use cherry for flavoring, but will
supliment it with oak or hickory for heat.

FWIW

Hey George! Still living in Granger? Cherry isn't nearly as
dense as oak or hickory so it will burn up quicker. As far
as flavor goes, I never did find cherry by itself to be
pleasant but when I mixed it with oak it was a very good
combo.


In Mishawaka, not far off!

After a bit of digging, found some BTU info for various woods:

BTU/Cord
Hickory, Shagbark: 27,500
Apple: 27,000
Maple: 25,500
Oak, Red: 24,600
Cherry, Black: 20,400

with all but apple listed as "Excellent" coal producing and it
was "Good".

--
George B. Ross is
remove the obvious bits for email
Why is it that being a good boy and being good at being
a boy don't require the same set of skills? - anonymous
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Old 06-04-2006, 01:05 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Cherry coal producing factoid



In Mishawaka, not far off!


The farm is on M-140 south of Watervliet, just in case you were
interested. g Someone tore up a field of apples, too. It's a shame to
see those burned in huge piles.

-John O



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Old 06-04-2006, 11:09 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Cherry coal producing factoid


"Dave Bugg" wrote in message
...
Denny Wheeler wrote:

I'd be interested in Dave Bugg's input on this--I know he has, and
uses, cherry wood. (along with apple, maple, and other fruitwoods;
Wenatchee is kind of a major fruit-growing center)


Oak and hickory seem to produce higher btu than cherry and apple.

--
Dave
www.davebbq.com





Higher Btu? Does that mean you get more heat from them than the Btu's on
the bottom?


In wood, you can usually translate the weight of the wood to a given number
of Btu. Most cases, that is about 7,000 per pound. Dryness and density are
the factors here. Cherry, although a hardwood, is not as dense as oak or
hickory, thus a given sized log will produce less heat than the others of
the same size. One can work as well as the other, you just have to feed
more volume for the same heat output.
http://mb-soft.com/juca/print/firewood.html



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Old 07-04-2006, 03:57 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Cherry coal producing factoid

Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

In wood, you can usually translate the weight of the wood to a given
number of Btu. Most cases, that is about 7,000 per pound. Dryness
and density are the factors here. Cherry, although a hardwood, is
not as dense as oak or hickory, thus a given sized log will produce
less heat than the others of the same size. One can work as well
as the other, you just have to feed more volume for the same heat
output. http://mb-soft.com/juca/print/firewood.html


That's, uhhh, that's what I meant.... ummm.... yeah. Thanks for the info.,
Ed.
--
Dave
www.davebbq.com




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