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Or should that be rott kohl? Either way, there are two head of red
cabbage in my fridge, and I shudder at the thought of vinegar, apples,
and other braising ideas.

I'm thinking of something with chestnuts (found a recipe) to bring out
the nuttiness that may be inherent in the beastie.

Does cabbage take well to roasting?

[For those of you tired of my pleas for help using CSA veggies,
there's less than 2 months to go, and lots of squashes and alliums
readying themselves for storage on the horizon]

maxine, off to "India" again this evening.
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"maxine in ri" schrieb :
> Or should that be rott kohl?


Rotkohl (or Rotkraut). Rot = red, Kraut = cabbage.

> Either way, there are two head of red
> cabbage in my fridge, and I shudder at the thought of vinegar, apples,
> and other braising ideas.
>

Well, there's Wiener Rotkraut with glazed chestnuts, but it involves
braising, 2 apples and 1 tblsp wine vinegar ;-)
(Apart from lemon, orange, wine, salt,pepper,caraway seeds,
lard, onion,etc).

> I'm thinking of something with chestnuts (found a recipe) to bring out
> the nuttiness that may be inherent in the beastie.
>
> Does cabbage take well to roasting?
>

Not really.

Cheers,

Michael Kuettner

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maxine in ri wrote:
>
> Or should that be rott kohl? Either way, there are two head of red
> cabbage in my fridge, and I shudder at the thought of vinegar, apples,
> and other braising ideas.


Does that include cabbage rolls?
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On Sep 29, 1:32*pm, "Michael Kuettner" >
wrote:
> "maxine in ri" schrieb :
>
> > Or should that be rott kohl? *

>
> Rotkohl (or Rotkraut). Rot = red, Kraut = cabbage.
>
> > Either way, there are two head of red
> > cabbage in my fridge, and I shudder at the thought of vinegar, apples,
> > and other braising ideas.

>
> Well, there's Wiener Rotkraut with glazed chestnuts, but it involves
> braising, 2 apples and 1 tblsp wine vinegar ;-)
> (Apart from lemon, orange, wine, salt,pepper,caraway seeds,
> lard, onion,etc).
>
> > I'm thinking of something with chestnuts (found a recipe) to bring out
> > the nuttiness that may be inherent in the beastie.

>
> > Does cabbage take well to roasting?

>
> Not really.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Michael Kuettner


Thank you Michael. My German is long gone.
maxine in ri
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maxine in ri wrote:


> Does cabbage take well to roasting?


Yes. Turn the oven on to 425. Heat a couple tablespoons of olive oil
in a large cast iron skillet and sautee a couple of cloves of crushed
garlic until fragrant.

Add your cabbage, the whole head (minus the core, of course), coarsely
chopped, a teaspoon of kosher salt, a teaspoon of dried thyme and a
generous grinding of black pepper (maybe 1/2 tsp?). Stir and toss to
coat the cabbage. Add maybe 1/3 cup of water to the pan. Chicken broth
is good if you've got it on hand, but water will work just fine. The
point is to provide a little steam.

Place in oven and roast for 10 minutes. Stir. Roast for 10 more
minutes. The cabbage should be tender, sweet and browned on the edges.
Taste and correct for salt and pepper.






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maxine in ri > wrote:

> Or should that be rott kohl?


Rotkohl.

> Either way, there are two head of red
> cabbage in my fridge, and I shudder at the thought of vinegar, apples,
> and other braising ideas.


Why? You tried it and didn't like it? If you want a specifically
German recipe, there is very often lard or bacon fat... is that a viable
option?

> I'm thinking of something with chestnuts (found a recipe) to bring out
> the nuttiness that may be inherent in the beastie.


Can't help there, as I don't like chestnuts.

> Does cabbage take well to roasting?


Well, you can make a gratin.

Here are a couple of recipes.

Rotkohl bayerische Art
Red Cabbage Bavarian Style
serves 4

1 head red cabbage (about 1 kg/ 2.2 pounds)
1 onion
30 g (about an ounce) clarified butter
1-2 teaspoons sugar
1-2 teaspoons caraway seeds (I omit them)
salt
freshly ground black pepper
1/4 l (a generous cup) meat or vegetable stock or broth
3 parsley twigs
2 tablespoons lemon juice

1. Quarter the cabbage and remove the outer leaves and the core. Wash
the quarters and slice finely. Peel the onion and chop finely.

2. In a pot, heat the butter and the sugar over medium-to-high heat and
let lightly brown, stirring constantly.

3. Add the cabbage, onions, caraway, salt and pepper, and cook for a
few seconds, stirring.

4. Add the stock or broth, bring to boil, and cook, covered, over
low-to-medium heat for about 15 minutes, until just soft.

5. Wash, dry and finely chop the parsley.

6. Sprinkle lemon juice over the cabbage to taste and serve, mixed with
parsley.



Rotkohlgratin
Red Cabbage Gratin
serves 5

2 large onions
1 garlic clove
1 medium-sized head red cabbage
1 small bunch parsley
4-5 tablespoons oil
200 ml (0.8 cup) cream
3 eggs
salt
Cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon ground caraway (I omit it)
1 teaspoon dried thyme
200 g (7 oz) grated cheese of choice (such as Gruyère, Gouda, Edam, or
mozzarella, each making a difference)
50 g (1.8 oz) butter

1. Peel and chop separately the onions and the garlic.

2. Clean and quarter the cabbage and remove the core. Wash and finely
slice the quarters.

3. Wash, dry and finely chop the parsley.

4. Heat the oil and, in batches, brown the cabbage and onions over low
heat, stirring, remove and let cool until just warm.

5. Mix in the garlic.

6. Mix the cream together with the eggs, salt, a healthy pinch of
Cayenne pepper, caraway and thyme.

7. Layer the cabbage, the cream mixture and about two-thirds of the
cheese in two layers in a large casserole with a lid. Sprinkle with the
rest of the cheese on top.

8. Place small pats of butter on top.

9. Cover, put on the lowest shelf of the cold oven and bake at
180°C/360°F, or by convection at 160°C/320°F for 20 minutes.

10. Remove the lid and bake for 30 more minutes until the top is nicely
browned.

Victor
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(Victor Sack) wrote in
on Sep Tue 2009 04:47 pm

> maxine in ri > wrote:
>
>> Or should that be rott kohl?

>
> Rotkohl.
>
>> Either way, there are two head of red
>> cabbage in my fridge, and I shudder at the thought of vinegar, apples,
>> and other braising ideas.

>
> Why? You tried it and didn't like it? If you want a specifically
> German recipe, there is very often lard or bacon fat... is that a viable
> option?
>
>> I'm thinking of something with chestnuts (found a recipe) to bring out
>> the nuttiness that may be inherent in the beastie.

>
> Can't help there, as I don't like chestnuts.
>
>> Does cabbage take well to roasting?

>
> Well, you can make a gratin.
>
> Here are a couple of recipes.
>
> Rotkohl bayerische Art
> Red Cabbage Bavarian Style
> serves 4
>
> 1 head red cabbage (about 1 kg/ 2.2 pounds)
> 1 onion
> 30 g (about an ounce) clarified butter
> 1-2 teaspoons sugar
> 1-2 teaspoons caraway seeds (I omit them)
> salt
> freshly ground black pepper
> 1/4 l (a generous cup) meat or vegetable stock or broth
> 3 parsley twigs
> 2 tablespoons lemon juice
>
> 1. Quarter the cabbage and remove the outer leaves and the core. Wash
> the quarters and slice finely. Peel the onion and chop finely.
>
> 2. In a pot, heat the butter and the sugar over medium-to-high heat and
> let lightly brown, stirring constantly.
>
> 3. Add the cabbage, onions, caraway, salt and pepper, and cook for a
> few seconds, stirring.
>
> 4. Add the stock or broth, bring to boil, and cook, covered, over
> low-to-medium heat for about 15 minutes, until just soft.
>
> 5. Wash, dry and finely chop the parsley.
>
> 6. Sprinkle lemon juice over the cabbage to taste and serve, mixed with
> parsley.
>
>
>
> Rotkohlgratin
> Red Cabbage Gratin
> serves 5
>
> 2 large onions
> 1 garlic clove
> 1 medium-sized head red cabbage
> 1 small bunch parsley
> 4-5 tablespoons oil
> 200 ml (0.8 cup) cream
> 3 eggs
> salt
> Cayenne pepper
> 1 teaspoon ground caraway (I omit it)
> 1 teaspoon dried thyme
> 200 g (7 oz) grated cheese of choice (such as Gruyère, Gouda, Edam, or
> mozzarella, each making a difference)
> 50 g (1.8 oz) butter
>
> 1. Peel and chop separately the onions and the garlic.
>
> 2. Clean and quarter the cabbage and remove the core. Wash and finely
> slice the quarters.
>
> 3. Wash, dry and finely chop the parsley.
>
> 4. Heat the oil and, in batches, brown the cabbage and onions over low
> heat, stirring, remove and let cool until just warm.
>
> 5. Mix in the garlic.
>
> 6. Mix the cream together with the eggs, salt, a healthy pinch of
> Cayenne pepper, caraway and thyme.
>
> 7. Layer the cabbage, the cream mixture and about two-thirds of the
> cheese in two layers in a large casserole with a lid. Sprinkle with the
> rest of the cheese on top.
>
> 8. Place small pats of butter on top.
>
> 9. Cover, put on the lowest shelf of the cold oven and bake at
> 180°C/360°F, or by convection at 160°C/320°F for 20 minutes.
>
> 10. Remove the lid and bake for 30 more minutes until the top is nicely
> browned.
>
> Victor
>


Around these parts red cabbage is panfried in a little butter, a little sugar and a little red wine.

--
Is that your nose, or are you eatting a banana? -Jimmy Durante


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maxine in ri wrote:
> Or should that be rott kohl? Either way, there are two head of red
> cabbage in my fridge, and I shudder at the thought of vinegar, apples,
> and other braising ideas.
>


Colcannon? I have never made it with red cabbage but ......
--
JL

> I'm thinking of something with chestnuts (found a recipe) to bring out
> the nuttiness that may be inherent in the beastie.
>
> Does cabbage take well to roasting?
>
> [For those of you tired of my pleas for help using CSA veggies,
> there's less than 2 months to go, and lots of squashes and alliums
> readying themselves for storage on the horizon]
>
> maxine, off to "India" again this evening.



--

Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq.

Domine, dirige nos.
Let the games begin!
http://fredeeky.typepad.com/fredeeky.../sf_anthem.mp3

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On Sep 29, 5:47*pm, (Victor Sack) wrote:
> maxine in ri > wrote:
>
> > Or should that be rott kohl?

>
> Rotkohl.
>
> > *Either way, there are two head of red
> > cabbage in my fridge, and I shudder at the thought of vinegar, apples,
> > and other braising ideas.

>
> Why? *You tried it and didn't like it? *If you want a specifically
> German recipe, there is very often lard or bacon fat... is that a viable
> option?


Mostly it's the braising that I dread. My experience with cooked
cabbage has left emotional scars. And I find the texture of cooked
apples (unless they're cooked inside a pie<g>) unappealing, so many of
the recipes I found for rotkohl turned me off.

Most recipes I've tried that call for lard seem to work ok (at least
we like them) using either shortening or margarine, even oil in a few
cases. Bacon and fatback are a little trickier, since they impart a
decided flavor that salt and liquid smoke just can't match.

> > I'm thinking of something with chestnuts (found a recipe) to bring out
> > the nuttiness that may be inherent in the beastie.

>
> Can't help there, as I don't like chestnuts.
>
> > Does cabbage take well to roasting?

>
> Well, you can make a gratin.
>
> Here are a couple of recipes.


The Barvarian one sounds too much like a braise, but the gratin sounds
tasty. Thank you!

maxine in ri
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On Sep 29, 6:23*pm, hahabogus > wrote:

> Around these parts red cabbage is panfried in a little butter, a little sugar and a little red wine.


Fry/sautee/slow-cook on top of the stove is sounding better and
better, altho a nice cheesy gratin keeps me from making a decision.
With two heads, we may be having both.

thank you
maxine in ri


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On Sep 29, 6:27*pm, "Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq." >
wrote:
> maxine in ri wrote:
> > Or should that be rott kohl? *Either way, there are two head of red
> > cabbage in my fridge, and I shudder at the thought of vinegar, apples,
> > and other braising ideas.

>
> Colcannon? *I have never made it with red cabbage but ......


We had purple potatoes the other week, altho they were more pink than
purple. If I'd known the red cabbage was coming in, I would have
saved them. We had a warm vegetable salad at a potluck Sunday, with
white turnips splotched magenta with beets. It was sort of pretty,
until it had sat out for a while, and the beets colored the carrots,
the turnips, the green veggie....

Bleedin' veggies! <g>

with apologies to our British friends
maxine in ri
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Kathleen wrote about roasting red cabbage:

> Turn the oven on to 425. Heat a couple tablespoons of olive oil in a
> large cast iron skillet and sautee a couple of cloves of crushed garlic
> until fragrant.
>
> Add your cabbage, the whole head (minus the core, of course), coarsely
> chopped, a teaspoon of kosher salt, a teaspoon of dried thyme and a
> generous grinding of black pepper (maybe 1/2 tsp?). Stir and toss to coat
> the cabbage. Add maybe 1/3 cup of water to the pan. Chicken broth is
> good if you've got it on hand, but water will work just fine. The point
> is to provide a little steam.
>
> Place in oven and roast for 10 minutes. Stir. Roast for 10 more minutes.
> The cabbage should be tender, sweet and browned on the edges. Taste and
> correct for salt and pepper.


That's about the same thought I had, except that I was thinking about
cutting the cabbage into wedges rather than coarsely chopping it. I liked
the idea of having a continuum of doneness.

Bob

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maxine wrote:

> We had a warm vegetable salad at a potluck Sunday, with white turnips
> splotched magenta with beets. It was sort of pretty, until it had sat out
> for a while, and the beets colored the carrots, the turnips, the green
> veggie....


"Y'ever been going down the buffet line and suddenly, here's a big pile of
yellow shit? Something ya ain't never _seen_ before! I don't know what is.
I'm not going to ask, either. But I am going to look at it. 'Cause other
people are eating of it! And I've noticed the average pile of yellow shit on
the buffet has about five ingredients in it. But they're all yellow. That
means four of them _gave up_."

---George Carlin "Fussy Eater"


Bob

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In article >,
"Bob Terwilliger" > wrote:

> maxine wrote:
>
> > We had a warm vegetable salad at a potluck Sunday, with white turnips
> > splotched magenta with beets. It was sort of pretty, until it had sat out
> > for a while, and the beets colored the carrots, the turnips, the green
> > veggie....


I went to a church potluck a couple of weeks ago. Somebody came late
and brought yet another cold salad, with red beets, potatoes and
carrots. Of course, everything was red. I had two helpings.

--
Dan Abel
Petaluma, California USA

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In article
>,
Ranée at Arabian Knits > wrote:

> In article
> >,
> maxine > wrote:
>
> > > Colcannon? *I have never made it with red cabbage but ......

>
> I love colcannon. I make it with kale.
>
> > We had purple potatoes the other week, altho they were more pink than
> > purple. If I'd known the red cabbage was coming in, I would have
> > saved them. We had a warm vegetable salad at a potluck Sunday, with
> > white turnips splotched magenta with beets. It was sort of pretty,
> > until it had sat out for a while, and the beets colored the carrots,
> > the turnips, the green veggie....
> >
> > Bleedin' veggies! <g>

>
> That made me think of something else you could do. I make a root
> vegetable hash, either by itself to serve with eggs or with a meat as a
> meal in itself. Adding cabbage to it would be really good, I think.
>
> Regards,
> Ranee


Actually, adding some thinly sliced cabbage to hash works just fine. ;-d
--
Peace! Om

"Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
--Steve Rothstein

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Bob Terwilliger wrote:
> Kathleen wrote about roasting red cabbage:
>
>> Turn the oven on to 425. Heat a couple tablespoons of olive oil in a
>> large cast iron skillet and sautee a couple of cloves of crushed garlic
>> until fragrant.
>>
>> Add your cabbage, the whole head (minus the core, of course), coarsely
>> chopped, a teaspoon of kosher salt, a teaspoon of dried thyme and a
>> generous grinding of black pepper (maybe 1/2 tsp?). Stir and toss to
>> coat
>> the cabbage. Add maybe 1/3 cup of water to the pan. Chicken broth is
>> good if you've got it on hand, but water will work just fine. The point
>> is to provide a little steam.
>>
>> Place in oven and roast for 10 minutes. Stir. Roast for 10 more
>> minutes.
>> The cabbage should be tender, sweet and browned on the edges. Taste and
>> correct for salt and pepper.

>
>
> That's about the same thought I had, except that I was thinking about
> cutting the cabbage into wedges rather than coarsely chopping it. I liked
> the idea of having a continuum of doneness.


Sure, that would work.

I also make this as a main dish with sliced kielbasa and serve it with
mashed potatoes.

My husbands brought one of the long-term outside contractors from the
plant home with him for dinner one day when I made this. I was annoyed
with him because I'd have made something a little nicer if I'd known we
were having a guest.

He wolfed it down, said it was the best meal he'd had in months (and
he'd been eating as much of any damned thing he wanted on GM's dime),
and that it made him homesick for his mother's cooking.

I boxed up the leftovers and sent them home with him.

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Ranee at Arabian Knits wrote:
>
> In article >,
> Mark Thorson > wrote:
>
> > maxine in ri wrote:
> > >
> > > Or should that be rott kohl? Either way, there are two head of red
> > > cabbage in my fridge, and I shudder at the thought of vinegar, apples,
> > > and other braising ideas.

> >
> > Does that include cabbage rolls?

>
> I have almost completely given up making cabbage rolls. I shred the
> cabbage and top with the meat, cover with sauce and bake it covered.
> Saves me so much time.


In that case, I could save you a lot of time
making wontons and eggrolls.
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maxine > wrote:

> Mostly it's the braising that I dread. My experience with cooked
> cabbage has left emotional scars. And I find the texture of cooked
> apples (unless they're cooked inside a pie<g>) unappealing, so many of
> the recipes I found for rotkohl turned me off.


Many recipes call for apples to be cut very thin, about 1/8-inch thin.
They fall apart and virtually disappear, just contributing some acidity.
Traditionally made red cabbage is basically a sweet-n-sour dish. Roast
goose is rarely served without red cabbage here in Germany.

> The Barvarian one sounds too much like a braise


Yes, but not a usual one. The cabbage is cooked for just 15 minutes,
not for 1-2 hours, and has a different texture.

Victor
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On Sep 30, 5:07*pm, (Victor Sack) wrote:
> maxine > wrote:
> > Mostly it's the braising that I dread. *My experience with cooked
> > cabbage has left emotional scars. *And I find the texture of cooked
> > apples (unless they're cooked inside a pie<g>) unappealing, so many of
> > the recipes I found for rotkohl turned me off.

>
> Many recipes call for apples to be cut very thin, about 1/8-inch thin.
> They fall apart and virtually disappear, just contributing some acidity.
> Traditionally made red cabbage is basically a sweet-n-sour dish. *Roast
> goose is rarely served without red cabbage here in Germany.
>
> > The Barvarian one sounds too much like a braise

>
> Yes, but not a usual one. *The cabbage is cooked for just 15 minutes,
> not for 1-2 hours, and has a different texture.
>
> Victor


Ok. I'll reconsider it. Thanks.

maxine.
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maxine wrote on Wed, 30 Sep 2009 19:16:21 -0700 (PDT):

> On Sep 30, 5:07 pm, (Victor Sack) wrote:
>> maxine > wrote:
> >> Mostly it's the braising that I dread. My experience with
> >> cooked cabbage has left emotional scars. And I find the
> >> texture of cooked apples (unless they're cooked inside a
> >> pie<g>) unappealing, so many of the recipes I found for
> >> rotkohl turned me off.

>>
>> Many recipes call for apples to be cut very thin, about
>> 1/8-inch thin. They fall apart and virtually disappear, just
>> contributing some acidity. Traditionally made red cabbage is
>> basically a sweet-n-sour dish. Roast goose is rarely served
>> without red cabbage here in Germany.
>>
> >> The Barvarian one sounds too much like a braise

>>
>> Yes, but not a usual one. The cabbage is cooked for just 15
>> minutes, not for 1-2 hours, and has a different texture.
>>
>> Victor


> Ok. I'll reconsider it. Thanks.


It's worth thinking about. I've said before that as a child I hated
cabbage (cooked to death British style). I was introduced to lightly
cooked cabbage by my wife and I still like it. I'm not even very
enthusiastic about the well-cooked cabbage taste of some Italian soups.

--

James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland

Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not



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James Silverton wrote:
> maxine wrote on Wed, 30 Sep 2009 19:16:21 -0700 (PDT):
>
>> On Sep 30, 5:07 pm, (Victor Sack) wrote:
>>
>>> maxine > wrote:

>>
>> >> Mostly it's the braising that I dread. My experience with
>> >> cooked cabbage has left emotional scars. And I find the
>> >> texture of cooked apples (unless they're cooked inside a
>> >> pie<g>) unappealing, so many of the recipes I found for
>> >> rotkohl turned me off.

>>
>>>
>>> Many recipes call for apples to be cut very thin, about
>>> 1/8-inch thin. They fall apart and virtually disappear, just
>>> contributing some acidity. Traditionally made red cabbage is
>>> basically a sweet-n-sour dish. Roast goose is rarely served
>>> without red cabbage here in Germany.
>>>
>> >> The Barvarian one sounds too much like a braise

>>
>>>
>>> Yes, but not a usual one. The cabbage is cooked for just 15
>>> minutes, not for 1-2 hours, and has a different texture.
>>>
>>> Victor

>>

>
>> Ok. I'll reconsider it. Thanks.

>
>
> It's worth thinking about. I've said before that as a child I hated
> cabbage (cooked to death British style). I was introduced to lightly
> cooked cabbage by my wife and I still like it. I'm not even very
> enthusiastic about the well-cooked cabbage taste of some Italian soups.
>


Ever tried the stir fried raw cabbage and rice noodles with shrimp, stir
fried in sesame oil, garlic, ginger and any other spices you desire?
serve with a bit of soy sauce?

The cabbage and precooked noodles are stir fried just to cook the
shrimp, heat the noodles and cabbage.

The cabbage can be put in the wok first and cooked longer if desired but
i like it with the cabbage still having a bit of crispness to it.

A little hot sauce or red pepper flakes and a bit of lemon juice are a
very good substitute for the soy sauce.

Works well with cut up chicken breast meat also. And if the Chinese
sausages are available they make a very nice addition to the cabbage and
noodles.

I usually stir fry the noodles till they begin to slightly brown.
--

Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq.

Domine, dirige nos.
Let the games begin!
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Mr. wrote on Thu, 01 Oct 2009 13:51:03 -0700:


> James Silverton wrote:
>> maxine wrote on Wed, 30 Sep 2009 19:16:21 -0700 (PDT):
>>
>>> On Sep 30, 5:07 pm, (Victor Sack) wrote:
>>>
>>>> maxine > wrote:
>>>
>> >>> Mostly it's the braising that I dread. My experience
>> >>> with cooked cabbage has left emotional scars. And I find
>> >>> the texture of cooked apples (unless they're cooked
>> >>> inside a pie<g>) unappealing, so many of the recipes I
>> >>> found for rotkohl turned me off.
>>>
>>>> Many recipes call for apples to be cut very thin, about
>>>> 1/8-inch thin. They fall apart and virtually disappear,
>>>> just contributing some acidity. Traditionally made red
>>>> cabbage is basically a sweet-n-sour dish. Roast goose is
>>>> rarely served without red cabbage here in Germany.
>>>>
>> >>> The Barvarian one sounds too much like a braise
>>>
>>>> Yes, but not a usual one. The cabbage is cooked for just
>>>> 15 minutes, not for 1-2 hours, and has a different texture.
>>>>
>>>> Victor
>>>
>>> Ok. I'll reconsider it. Thanks.

>>
>> It's worth thinking about. I've said before that as a child I
>> hated cabbage (cooked to death British style). I was
>> introduced to lightly cooked cabbage by my wife and I still
>> like it. I'm not even very enthusiastic about the well-cooked
>> cabbage taste of some Italian soups.
>>

> Ever tried the stir fried raw cabbage and rice noodles with
> shrimp, stir fried in sesame oil, garlic, ginger and any other
> spices you desire? serve with a bit of soy sauce?


> The cabbage and precooked noodles are stir fried just to cook
> the shrimp, heat the noodles and cabbage.


> The cabbage can be put in the wok first and cooked longer if
> desired but i like it with the cabbage still having a bit of
> crispness to it.


> A little hot sauce or red pepper flakes and a bit of lemon
> juice are a very good substitute for the soy sauce.


> Works well with cut up chicken breast meat also. And if the
> Chinese sausages are available they make a very nice addition
> to the cabbage and noodles.


> I usually stir fry the noodles till they begin to slightly
> brown. --

Sounds good! Thanks, I'll give it a try!

--

James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland

Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not
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Default Rot coal!



James Silverton wrote:

>>>

>> Ever tried the stir fried raw cabbage and rice noodles with
>> shrimp, stir fried in sesame oil, garlic, ginger and any other
>> spices you desire? serve with a bit of soy sauce?

>
>
>> The cabbage and precooked noodles are stir fried just to cook the
>> shrimp, heat the noodles and cabbage.

>
>
>> The cabbage can be put in the wok first and cooked longer if
>> desired but i like it with the cabbage still having a bit of
>> crispness to it.

>
>
>> A little hot sauce or red pepper flakes and a bit of lemon
>> juice are a very good substitute for the soy sauce.

>
>
>> Works well with cut up chicken breast meat also. And if the
>> Chinese sausages are available they make a very nice addition to the
>> cabbage and noodles.

>
>
>> I usually stir fry the noodles till they begin to slightly
>> brown. --

>
> Sounds good! Thanks, I'll give it a try!
>


I forgot to mention, i 'chiffonade' about 1/4 head of cored cabbage and
use about 1 pound of cooked rice noodles for 2 people and there are
usually leftovers. Its a very filling dish.

Using pre cooked & marinated shrimp and/or diced breast of chicken is
extra good. Lots of garlic and even butter if you want along with some
green onions or shallots.

If starting with raw diced chicken breast and/or shrimp i would first
saute the chicken and/or shrimp in butter with garlic and shallots,
scallions or green onions, even a small dice of white of leek. Then
finish with some white wine and toss the cabbage and pre-cooked noodles
in to quickly cook over a hot flame.


Plus i have made the dish with ordinary American spaghetti to good
effect but i do like the slightly thicker Chinese rice noodles.

If i had to choose between an Asian cabbage stir fry and an Irish
colcannon i would chose the colcannon. But i will also puree a quarter
head of cabbage and put it in a meat loaf, mix it up with all the other
pureed veggies, seasonings and ground meat and bake with a pinch of mace
in it, and the Worcestershire (sp?) sauce is assumed in such a meat
loaf, i don't usually use a bread, cracker or other such type of filler,
though i have used oat bran and wheat bran as a filler for meat loaf, i
prefer pureed raw veggies as the filler in a meat loaf, with an emphasis
on the cabbage.

--

Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq.

Domine, dirige nos.
Let the games begin!
http://fredeeky.typepad.com/fredeeky.../sf_anthem.mp3

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On Sep 30, 10:56*am, Ranée at Arabian Knits >
wrote:
> In article
> >,
>
>
>
> *maxine > wrote:
> > On Sep 29, 4:22*pm, Ranée at Arabian Knits >
> > wrote:
> > > In article
> > > >,
> > > *maxine in ri > wrote:

>
> > > > Does cabbage take well to roasting?

>
> > > * *They roast very well, I think. * I like them sliced and slowly cooked
> > > in oil or fat with onions, garlic and thyme, s & p. *I sprinkle with a
> > > little chicken broth or cider, but you don't need to do so.

>
> > Could you be a tad more specific, please? *How thick to slice? *What
> > you describe sounds like a stove-top method, unless you cook the
> > alliums and then put them atop the roasted cabbage.

>
> * *I use oil or butter *(or chicken fat or lard or bacon grease,
> whatever I have that tastes good, depending on if it is a meat fast day
> or not), slice the cabbage in thin-ish bits, not like coleslaw, but not
> giant. *I do slice the onions and garlic thinly. *I don't saute them so
> much as just slowly cook the onions and garlic until the onions are a
> little caramelized, sometimes I peel and slice an apple or two to cook
> with the onions and garlic, then add the cabbage, salt and pepper, thyme
> and cook down a bit, covering if necessary and stirring occasionally. *I
> like to add either broth or cider, and I do enjoy a splash of apple
> cider vinegar, but none of them is necessary. *It just takes longer than
> you would think to cook it. *
>
> * *I also make a meal out of it with either kielbasa or some sort of
> smoked & cooked sausage. *If I do that, then I start by cooking the
> sausage slices and cook potatoes with the onions before adding the
> cabbage.
>
> > That sounds like the sort of thing I would likely do. *Got some
> > chicken broth in the freezer looking for a use<G>

>
> * *I hope you enjoy it.


Ranee, this worked great! Caramelized the onions, added the garlic
and cabbage and covered for 10-15 minutes. The cabbage had that nutty
taste, and I forget who suggested it, but at the very end I added some
soy sauce, sesame oil, and pepper.

Served it with red bean buns, steamed in the microwave.

Thank you!

maxine in ri
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