Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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Old 15-01-2007, 06:40 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Thoughts on Bradley Smoker

My digital Bradley is now a couple months old and I've had a little
experience with it. As some of you may recall, I'm not new to
barbecuing, but am now in a situation where real estate is very limited
and I no longer want to fiddle with charcoal or preburn. I have a very
decent gas grill and have built my own IR cooker for sear cooking. The
Bradley is the third addition to my arsenal, and I wouldn't trade it for
anything.

The Bradley arrived in perfect condition. The unit was packaged about
as well as anyone could ask- to me that is just another sign of quality.
It assembled in about 2 minutes with excellent instructions. Recipes
or helpful suggestions are a bit lacking, but since I've cooked a couple
pounds of meat in my life, I had a few recipes of my own to play around
with.

The Bradley is for folks who want to crank out a consistent result. It
takes a lot, but not all, of the art out of smoking meat. It leaves you
with control of temperature and the duration of smoke (independently),
and of course you have complete control of marinades, rubs, mops, brines
and cures.

When we have company, and that's frequently, I had a conflict between
cooking them some good fare and showing them around town. With the
Bradley, you can set it and jump in the car, returning later to
perfectly cooked and smoked meat. When I discuss the following, please
do not consider it to be criticism of the Bradley, but just my own
thoughts of alternatives that "tweak" an already good system.

1) I have a Power Raptor and Competitor controller on order. The
digital controls of the Bradley are good, but lack any logic control.
As with an oven, you pick a temperature and duration for cooking. With
the Power Raptor and Competitor controls, you set a hood temperature and
meat temperature. As the meat temperature approaches the hood
temperature, the hood temperature is reduced until the two meet at the
meat's setpoint. Then, the temperature is changed to a holding
temperature. This will only increase my ability to "set and forget" the
Bradley.

2) Setting of the damper is probably the biggest learning curve for the
Bradley. The damper is what you use to control the humidity inside the
hood. Like the R2D2, there's a water pan in the Bradley. The purpose
of the pan is to catch the smoked out wood pucks and extinguish them.
However, I've found I can toss in some orange or apple juice and flavor
the smoke a tad, as with the R2D2. Once I got comfortable using a
steamy hood to begin with, then drying it out by opening the damper
fully to give a crust to the meat, I was quite happy. I may even
motorize this one day, just for the fun of it.

3) I wish that the heating element (500 VA) was larger. During freezing
weather here, I felt that the Bradley struggled a tad when first loaded
and possibly even later on. I see no reason why I couldn't toss in
either a second element or a bigger one, and might do so. I cannot say
what the power switching capability of the factory controls are, but the
Power Raptor is good for 1500 or so watts, as I recall, so it's a moot
point.

--
-Nonnymus-

Please stop Californicating Nevada

In the periodic table, as in politics,
the unstable elements tend to hang out on
the far left, with some to the far right as well.

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Old 15-01-2007, 10:13 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Thoughts on Bradley Smoker

I believe you are correct. I think that the on/off cycle is switched as
a function of the temperature inputs, and thus is "proportional," so to
speak. Rather than heating up until a temp is reached, then allowing
the hood to cool down until more heat is needed, the Power Raptor
switches on (or off) more or less frequently, depending on the need for
heat. It's an on/off equivalent of a rheostat, so to speak. That should
give a lot tighter control of the temperature in the hood. With the
Digital Bradley controls alone, I generally see about +- 5f swing around
the setpoint. That's no big deal, but what the heck. grin

I'm sure that I could also build something that would work, but having
no parts on hand, I'd have to locate and purchase everything. To me, if
someone has already built what I (think I) want and it's not
unreasonably priced, I'll just get it and be happy.

Nonny

yetanotherBob wrote:
In article ,
says...

---snip---

1) I have a Power Raptor and Competitor controller on order.

---snip---

I'd be interested in reading your thoughts on the Power Raptor
interface, specifically whether it's worth the money. It seems like
it's something that could be built fairly easily, although I may well
have an oversimplified view of what it's actually doing (i.e., turning
the heating element on and off in response to input from the Guru
Competitor logic unit).

Good luck with your new, soon to be automated, rig.
Bob


--
-Nonnymus-

Please stop Californicating Nevada

In the periodic table, as in politics,
the unstable elements tend to hang out on
the far left, with some to the far right as well.
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Old 16-01-2007, 03:27 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Thoughts on Bradley Smoker

OK, thanks for the insights. If the Bradley thermostat is actually
accurate, +/- 5 degrees around a set point seems quite good.

I don't know whether the Guru's even have that sort of responsiveness,
given that they originally were set up to drive fans that provided draft
for wood/charcoal heat sources. In any event, they do provide the
unique cooking temperature ramping control, which I was surprised to
learn that the "digital" Bradley did not include.

Do you happen to know offhand whether the Power Raptor also powers the
Guru Competitor, or do you still have to use the wall wart power supply?

BTW, the phrase in your post, "a lot tighter control of the temperature
in the hood" made me visualize something a gang detail detective in Los
Angeles might say. In a previous barbecue incarnation, did you perhaps
burn "logz" or "stickz" to get the requisite heat in the hood? ;-)

Bob
========================
In article ,
says...

I believe you are correct. I think that the on/off cycle is switched as
a function of the temperature inputs, and thus is "proportional," so to
speak. Rather than heating up until a temp is reached, then allowing
the hood to cool down until more heat is needed, the Power Raptor
switches on (or off) more or less frequently, depending on the need for
heat. It's an on/off equivalent of a rheostat, so to speak. That should
give a lot tighter control of the temperature in the hood. With the
Digital Bradley controls alone, I generally see about +- 5f swing around
the setpoint. That's no big deal, but what the heck. grin

I'm sure that I could also build something that would work, but having
no parts on hand, I'd have to locate and purchase everything. To me, if
someone has already built what I (think I) want and it's not
unreasonably priced, I'll just get it and be happy.

Nonny

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Old 16-01-2007, 04:22 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Thoughts on Bradley Smoker

Ha- nope, to my generation, the "hood" is what fits over a barbecue pit.

I don't have my Power Raptor yet, but believe that it merely requires a
variable DC input from one of the controllers. My guess is that either
takes a wall wart to supply control voltages.

Nonny

yetanotherBob wrote:
OK, thanks for the insights. If the Bradley thermostat is actually
accurate, +/- 5 degrees around a set point seems quite good.

I don't know whether the Guru's even have that sort of responsiveness,
given that they originally were set up to drive fans that provided draft
for wood/charcoal heat sources. In any event, they do provide the
unique cooking temperature ramping control, which I was surprised to
learn that the "digital" Bradley did not include.

Do you happen to know offhand whether the Power Raptor also powers the
Guru Competitor, or do you still have to use the wall wart power supply?

BTW, the phrase in your post, "a lot tighter control of the temperature
in the hood" made me visualize something a gang detail detective in Los
Angeles might say. In a previous barbecue incarnation, did you perhaps
burn "logz" or "stickz" to get the requisite heat in the hood? ;-)

Bob
========================
In article ,
says...
I believe you are correct. I think that the on/off cycle is switched as
a function of the temperature inputs, and thus is "proportional," so to
speak. Rather than heating up until a temp is reached, then allowing
the hood to cool down until more heat is needed, the Power Raptor
switches on (or off) more or less frequently, depending on the need for
heat. It's an on/off equivalent of a rheostat, so to speak. That should
give a lot tighter control of the temperature in the hood. With the
Digital Bradley controls alone, I generally see about +- 5f swing around
the setpoint. That's no big deal, but what the heck. grin

I'm sure that I could also build something that would work, but having
no parts on hand, I'd have to locate and purchase everything. To me, if
someone has already built what I (think I) want and it's not
unreasonably priced, I'll just get it and be happy.

Nonny


--
-Nonnymus-

Please stop Californicating Nevada

In the periodic table, as in politics,
the unstable elements tend to hang out on
the far left, with some to the far right as well.


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Old 16-01-2007, 04:28 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 97
Default Thoughts on Bradley Smoker


"Nonnymus" wrote in message
news
My digital Bradley is now a couple months old and I've had a little
experience with it. As some of you may recall, I'm not new to barbecuing,
but am now in a situation where real estate is very limited and I no
longer want to fiddle with charcoal or preburn. I have a very decent gas
grill and have built my own IR cooker for sear cooking. The Bradley is
the third addition to my arsenal, and I wouldn't trade it for anything.

The Bradley arrived in perfect condition. The unit was packaged about as
well as anyone could ask- to me that is just another sign of quality. It
assembled in about 2 minutes with excellent instructions. Recipes or
helpful suggestions are a bit lacking, but since I've cooked a couple
pounds of meat in my life, I had a few recipes of my own to play around
with.

The Bradley is for folks who want to crank out a consistent result. It
takes a lot, but not all, of the art out of smoking meat. It leaves you
with control of temperature and the duration of smoke (independently), and
of course you have complete control of marinades, rubs, mops, brines and
cures.

When we have company, and that's frequently, I had a conflict between
cooking them some good fare and showing them around town. With the
Bradley, you can set it and jump in the car, returning later to perfectly
cooked and smoked meat. When I discuss the following, please do not
consider it to be criticism of the Bradley, but just my own thoughts of
alternatives that "tweak" an already good system.

1) I have a Power Raptor and Competitor controller on order. The digital
controls of the Bradley are good, but lack any logic control. As with an
oven, you pick a temperature and duration for cooking. With the Power
Raptor and Competitor controls, you set a hood temperature and meat
temperature. As the meat temperature approaches the hood temperature, the
hood temperature is reduced until the two meet at the meat's setpoint.
Then, the temperature is changed to a holding temperature. This will only
increase my ability to "set and forget" the Bradley.

2) Setting of the damper is probably the biggest learning curve for the
Bradley. The damper is what you use to control the humidity inside the
hood. Like the R2D2, there's a water pan in the Bradley. The purpose of
the pan is to catch the smoked out wood pucks and extinguish them.
However, I've found I can toss in some orange or apple juice and flavor
the smoke a tad, as with the R2D2. Once I got comfortable using a steamy
hood to begin with, then drying it out by opening the damper fully to give
a crust to the meat, I was quite happy. I may even motorize this one day,
just for the fun of it.

3) I wish that the heating element (500 VA) was larger. During freezing
weather here, I felt that the Bradley struggled a tad when first loaded
and possibly even later on. I see no reason why I couldn't toss in either
a second element or a bigger one, and might do so. I cannot say what the
power switching capability of the factory controls are, but the Power
Raptor is good for 1500 or so watts, as I recall, so it's a moot point.


How cold do you consider freezing? I've got -14C here overnight, and -8C
during the day. My freezer is stocked with smoked goods, but I've been
considering the Bradley for fresh consistency. Do you think it would
perform well in the shed with my well works? Since that area is minimally
heated, I've been toying with the idea of putting an over the stovetop vent
out there to accomodate an electric smoker. High winds are a big concern
here in Newfoundland.

I've also heard there is no smoke ring when you use these. I wonder if I
could fake that effect with small amounts of lump charcoal dust on the
pucks?

--
-Nonnymus-

Please stop Californicating Nevada

In the periodic table, as in politics,
the unstable elements tend to hang out on
the far left, with some to the far right as well.



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Old 16-01-2007, 04:50 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
Reg Reg is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 383
Default Thoughts on Bradley Smoker

D. Winsor wrote:

How cold do you consider freezing? I've got -14C here overnight, and -8C
during the day. My freezer is stocked with smoked goods, but I've been
considering the Bradley for fresh consistency. Do you think it would
perform well in the shed with my well works? Since that area is minimally
heated, I've been toying with the idea of putting an over the stovetop vent
out there to accomodate an electric smoker. High winds are a big concern
here in Newfoundland.


That's what I hear from friends in the area. WINDY. Pretty
as a picture, though.

If you're in the market for an electric smoker and you're
in a cold/windy area, you'd want a unit with a lot of heating
power and, more importantly, maximum insulation. Bradley is not
that high on the scale for either of those. It's somewhere
in the middle.

A common complaint about the Bradley is that it doesn't
get hot enough. That's obviously compounded when operating
in very cold environments.

I've also heard there is no smoke ring when you use these. I wonder if I
could fake that effect with small amounts of lump charcoal dust on the
pucks?


No smoke ring with an electric box smoker, unfortunately.
You're on the right track with your solution. One trick
is to put a chuck of charcoal near the heating element
so it gives off smoke. This creates a visible smoke ring.

You can also give it a light rub of nitrite cure before
cooking (tenderquick, prague powder). That will create the
same effect. Since smoke ring is purely cosmetic I don't
bother. Personal preference there.

--
Reg

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Old 16-01-2007, 05:16 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Posts: 143
Default Thoughts on Bradley Smoker-smoke ring

I have a pet theory about smoke rings in meat, but will defer to the
wisdom here in the newsgroup. My theory is that the smoke ring is not
caused by smoke, but rather carbon monoxide given off by the incomplete
combustion of the wood or charcoal. If you have ever seen a person who
died from carbon monoxide poisoning, you would understand what I am
saying. They have a deep red, purplish color- a nice "smoke ring," so
to speak. Someday, if someone has a cylinder of CO, it might be fun to
place a Boston Butt in a trash sack outdoors and flow in CO for a few
hours to see if the meat gets a "smoke ring."

Based upon my pet theory, I bet I could do this with my Bradley and a
cylinder of CO, but am to lazy to give it a try.

Nonny

Reg wrote:
D. Winsor wrote:

How cold do you consider freezing? I've got -14C here overnight, and
-8C during the day. My freezer is stocked with smoked goods, but I've
been considering the Bradley for fresh consistency. Do you think it
would perform well in the shed with my well works? Since that area is
minimally heated, I've been toying with the idea of putting an over
the stovetop vent out there to accomodate an electric smoker. High
winds are a big concern here in Newfoundland.


That's what I hear from friends in the area. WINDY. Pretty
as a picture, though.

If you're in the market for an electric smoker and you're
in a cold/windy area, you'd want a unit with a lot of heating
power and, more importantly, maximum insulation. Bradley is not
that high on the scale for either of those. It's somewhere
in the middle.

A common complaint about the Bradley is that it doesn't
get hot enough. That's obviously compounded when operating
in very cold environments.

I've also heard there is no smoke ring when you use these. I wonder
if I could fake that effect with small amounts of lump charcoal dust
on the pucks?


No smoke ring with an electric box smoker, unfortunately.
You're on the right track with your solution. One trick
is to put a chuck of charcoal near the heating element
so it gives off smoke. This creates a visible smoke ring.

You can also give it a light rub of nitrite cure before
cooking (tenderquick, prague powder). That will create the
same effect. Since smoke ring is purely cosmetic I don't
bother. Personal preference there.


--
-Nonnymus-

Please stop Californicating Nevada

In the periodic table, as in politics,
the unstable elements tend to hang out on
the far left, with some to the far right as well.
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Old 16-01-2007, 05:41 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Posts: 97
Default Thoughts on Bradley Smoker


"Reg" wrote in message
et...
D. Winsor wrote:

How cold do you consider freezing? I've got -14C here overnight, and -8C
during the day. My freezer is stocked with smoked goods, but I've been
considering the Bradley for fresh consistency. Do you think it would
perform well in the shed with my well works? Since that area is
minimally heated, I've been toying with the idea of putting an over the
stovetop vent out there to accomodate an electric smoker. High winds are
a big concern here in Newfoundland.


That's what I hear from friends in the area. WINDY. Pretty
as a picture, though.

If you're in the market for an electric smoker and you're
in a cold/windy area, you'd want a unit with a lot of heating
power and, more importantly, maximum insulation. Bradley is not
that high on the scale for either of those. It's somewhere
in the middle.

A common complaint about the Bradley is that it doesn't
get hot enough. That's obviously compounded when operating
in very cold environments.


I've also been looking at Cookshack options to, but I've got a plan to
upgrade the Bradley and then utilise the smoke generator on an old but
functioning fridge to make a true cold smoker. Besides, Crappy Tire puts
the basic Bradley on sale here regularly for $289 CDN. What with Crappy
Tire points and money I can buy the smoker unit for about the $200 CDN they
want for just the smoke generator. I thinking about the Bradley as my first
electric smoker. Perhaps it'll be my first indoor vented smoker too.

I've also heard there is no smoke ring when you use these. I wonder if I
could fake that effect with small amounts of lump charcoal dust on the
pucks?


No smoke ring with an electric box smoker, unfortunately.
You're on the right track with your solution. One trick
is to put a chuck of charcoal near the heating element
so it gives off smoke. This creates a visible smoke ring.

You can also give it a light rub of nitrite cure before
cooking (tenderquick, prague powder). That will create the
same effect. Since smoke ring is purely cosmetic I don't
bother. Personal preference there.


A smoke ring looks so damn good on brisket. I may give the powder trick a
try when I take the plunge. I'm learning a lot from Nonymous and his
posting right now. I seem to be also paralleling his sausage making
efforts.

--
Reg



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Old 16-01-2007, 05:45 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Thoughts on Bradley Smoker-smoke ring


"Nonnymus" wrote in message
...
I have a pet theory about smoke rings in meat, but will defer to the wisdom
here in the newsgroup. My theory is that the smoke ring is not caused by
smoke, but rather carbon monoxide given off by the incomplete combustion of
the wood or charcoal. If you have ever seen a person who died from carbon
monoxide poisoning, you would understand what I am saying. They have a
deep red, purplish color- a nice "smoke ring," so to speak. Someday, if
someone has a cylinder of CO, it might be fun to place a Boston Butt in a
trash sack outdoors and flow in CO for a few hours to see if the meat gets
a "smoke ring."

Based upon my pet theory, I bet I could do this with my Bradley and a
cylinder of CO, but am to lazy to give it a try.


I've heard this before. I may well have heard it here from you, but I've
definitely heard this. Do you think a stove hood would vent your Bradley
adequately? Especially consider that I'm not thinking of venting a living
area to accomodate this.

Nonny

Reg wrote:
D. Winsor wrote:

How cold do you consider freezing? I've got -14C here overnight,
and -8C during the day. My freezer is stocked with smoked goods, but
I've been considering the Bradley for fresh consistency. Do you think
it would perform well in the shed with my well works? Since that area
is minimally heated, I've been toying with the idea of putting an over
the stovetop vent out there to accomodate an electric smoker. High
winds are a big concern here in Newfoundland.


That's what I hear from friends in the area. WINDY. Pretty
as a picture, though.

If you're in the market for an electric smoker and you're
in a cold/windy area, you'd want a unit with a lot of heating
power and, more importantly, maximum insulation. Bradley is not
that high on the scale for either of those. It's somewhere
in the middle.

A common complaint about the Bradley is that it doesn't
get hot enough. That's obviously compounded when operating
in very cold environments.

I've also heard there is no smoke ring when you use these. I wonder if
I could fake that effect with small amounts of lump charcoal dust on the
pucks?


No smoke ring with an electric box smoker, unfortunately.
You're on the right track with your solution. One trick
is to put a chuck of charcoal near the heating element
so it gives off smoke. This creates a visible smoke ring.

You can also give it a light rub of nitrite cure before
cooking (tenderquick, prague powder). That will create the
same effect. Since smoke ring is purely cosmetic I don't
bother. Personal preference there.


--
-Nonnymus-

Please stop Californicating Nevada

In the periodic table, as in politics,
the unstable elements tend to hang out on
the far left, with some to the far right as well.





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Old 16-01-2007, 05:54 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
Reg Reg is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 383
Default Thoughts on Bradley Smoker-smoke ring

Nonnymus wrote:

I have a pet theory about smoke rings in meat, but will defer to the
wisdom here in the newsgroup. My theory is that the smoke ring is not
caused by smoke, but rather carbon monoxide given off by the incomplete
combustion of the wood or charcoal. If you have ever seen a person who
died from carbon monoxide poisoning, you would understand what I am
saying. They have a deep red, purplish color- a nice "smoke ring," so
to speak. Someday, if someone has a cylinder of CO, it might be fun to
place a Boston Butt in a trash sack outdoors and flow in CO for a few
hours to see if the meat gets a "smoke ring."


This thread shows a smoke ring experiment, including
some decent pictures.

http://forum.cookshack.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/2991028883/m/7861049883?r=7861049883#7861049883

In this case the smoke ring was "artifically" created in two ways

- Adding charcoal in with the wood
- Rubbing the meat with a nitrate/nitrite cure

That seems easier than using CO, but what the heck. If you
ever try it post the results. It'll be one more datapoint
to learn from.

--
Reg

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Old 16-01-2007, 06:32 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
Reg Reg is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 383
Default Thoughts on Bradley Smoker

D. Winsor wrote:

I've also been looking at Cookshack options to, but I've got a plan to
upgrade the Bradley and then utilise the smoke generator on an old but
functioning fridge to make a true cold smoker. Besides, Crappy Tire puts
the basic Bradley on sale here regularly for $289 CDN. What with Crappy
Tire points and money I can buy the smoker unit for about the $200 CDN they
want for just the smoke generator. I thinking about the Bradley as my first
electric smoker. Perhaps it'll be my first indoor vented smoker too.


That's what I use the Bradley for too... cold smoking with
just the smoke generator. It's makes for the best cold smoker
on the market right now, bar none. Expensive, about a $1/hour
USD to run, but superior in every way.

Now, if you're using the full Bradley unit, i.e. with the
oven chamber, and you're in a really cold/windy area, you might
end up with a cold smoker whether you like it or not. Crank
the oven up to max, and it's still basically a cold
smoker

If you're cost conscious, do some math and make sure you
know how much it will cost you to use in the long run, which
is what really counts. For the Bradley I spend about $1000+ USD
per year on expendables (read: goddamn pucks), but it more
than pays for itself in labor savings. The pucks are tax
deductable to me.

My first Bradley smoke box wasn't a fridge or anything, it
was made out of sheetrock and duct tape. Took about 15
minutes to build, and it worked like a charm. It was years
before I felt the need to build something more permanent.

A smoke ring looks so damn good on brisket. I may give the powder trick a
try when I take the plunge. I'm learning a lot from Nonymous and his
posting right now. I seem to be also paralleling his sausage making
efforts.


The "powdered puck" solution seems a bit convoluted to
me. You pay a lot for the puck things, then you have
to bend over backwards to get the rig to burn charcoal
along with the pucks? Worst of both worlds it would seem.

You could just get a conventional electric box smoker
that employs a wood box. Put the charcoal in the wood
box along with the wood. Problem solved, for a lot less
money (dont't forget: pucks = recurring costs).

But if you really want the Bradley for it's other features,
I can sure understand not wanting to own two units. If you
try the powdered puck thing please us know how it works.
One caveat I'd have is that you risk gumming up the
generator with the dust. Be advised they're not very
robust.

--
Reg

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Old 16-01-2007, 06:53 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Thoughts on Bradley Smoker-smoke ring

Nonnymus wrote:
I have a pet theory about smoke rings in meat, but will defer to the
wisdom here in the newsgroup. My theory is that the smoke ring is not
caused by smoke, but rather carbon monoxide given off by the
incomplete combustion of the wood or charcoal.


Smoke ring is caused by the nitrates and nitrites contained in wood smoke
reacting to myoglobin in muscle tissue. CO has nothing to do with it at all.

--
Dave
www.davebbq.com



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Old 16-01-2007, 09:41 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Thoughts on Bradley Smoker

First of all, you have to keep in mind that the Bradley was designed to be a
"Low and Slow" cooker, hence the unit shuts down when temps reach in excess
of 320F. So while I agree that it doesn't get too hot, it was never
designed to be a high temp cooker. I checked out lots of smokers before
settling on the Bradley, and for the money, its the best smoker available
imho. It is much better insulated than most smokers, and the heating
element seems sufficient to me, and I routinely BBQ in sub freezing temps,
with little to no problems.

If you can't maintain temps in your Bradley, I would argue that you are
either opening the door too much or simply need to insert a mass to hold
heat such as a brick, which will fit nicely next to the water bowl. Simply
place the brick in your oven, set the temp to 250 or 300 for a little while,
then move the brick to your Bradley. Also, filling the water bowl with HOT
water seems to help the Bradley reach/maintain temps. On long smokes, I
will also replace the water bowl with one of those aluminum foil roasting
pans. One of those pans will hold more (hot) water than the bowl will.
Lets you smoke for longer periods without worrying about the water drying
up, or the bowl overflowing with spent pucks.

A Maverick smoker thermometer is an invaluable tool in combination with a
Bradley imho. Really helps to keep the door closed when you know exactly
what your cabinet and internal meat temps are.

Also, the aluminum dummy pucks when used in a set of three, can eliminate
the need to open the door when the smoking process is down, plus it saves
you from wasting 2 wood bisquettes each time you use your Bradley. Check
out ebay for the aluminum pucks.


"Reg" wrote in message
et...

If you're in the market for an electric smoker and you're
in a cold/windy area, you'd want a unit with a lot of heating
power and, more importantly, maximum insulation. Bradley is not
that high on the scale for either of those. It's somewhere
in the middle.

A common complaint about the Bradley is that it doesn't
get hot enough. That's obviously compounded when operating
in very cold environments.


Reg



  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 16-01-2007, 11:05 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,215
Default Thoughts on Bradley Smoker-smoke ring

"Dave Bugg" wrote in message
news
Nonnymus wrote:
I have a pet theory about smoke rings in meat, but will defer to the
wisdom here in the newsgroup. My theory is that the smoke ring is
not caused by smoke, but rather carbon monoxide given off by the
incomplete combustion of the wood or charcoal.


Smoke ring is caused by the nitrates and nitrites contained in wood
smoke reacting to myoglobin in muscle tissue. CO has nothing to do
with it at all.
--
Dave
www.davebbq.com


Exactly. I can make a beautiful "smoke ring" with Tender Quick®, even if
it's cooked in the oven (not that I'd do this)
;-)

BOB




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