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Torresmos (Portuguese Garlic Roasted Pork)



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 01-03-2007, 07:54 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 153
Default Torresmos (Portuguese Garlic Roasted Pork)

I make the below recipe once a year for my Portuguese husband. He loves it.
To me the meat is tough and dry, but very tasty. I've tried cooking it
less, but then you don't get the lovely browned flavor. Wondering if anyone
had any other suggestions to make it more tender and not so dry. I have my
MILs recipe, but she passed away 6 months after we were married and I never
got to do any cooking with her. Lynne

Torresmos (Portuguese Garlic Roasted Pork)

4-pound boneless pork butt, cut into 1 1/2 inch cubes
Salt and freshly ground pepper

Marinade
1/2 pound medium-hot red chiles, seeded and stemmed
1 tsp salt
4 tablespoons paprika, sweet or hot depending on preference
10 cloves garlic, chopped
1/2 cup white wine
1/4 cup red wine

Place the chiles and salt in the bowl of food processor fitted with a metal
blade and pulse until minced. In a large bowl, combine the minced chiles
with the remaining marinade ingredients. Add the pork pieces, turning to
coat well. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 24 hours.

Remove the pork from the marinade. Add the pork to large roasting pan
season with salt and pepper and cook in a preheated 375F (190C) oven for 1
hour. Turn the pork often to keep it moist. Reduce the heat to 325F (160C)
and cook an additional 15 to 20 minutes, or until the pork is nicely
browned. Serve with Classic Portuguese Beans.

Serves 6 to 8


Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 01-03-2007, 09:30 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 15
Default Torresmos (Portuguese Garlic Roasted Pork)

"King's Crown" wrote in message
. ..

I make the below recipe once a year for my Portuguese
husband. He loves it. To me the meat is tough and dry,
but very tasty. I've tried cooking it less, but then you don't
get the lovely browned flavor. Wondering if anyone had any
other suggestions to make it more tender and not so dry. I have my MILs
recipe, but she passed away 6 months after
we were married and I never got to do any cooking with her.

Torresmos (Portuguese Garlic Roasted Pork)

4-pound boneless pork butt, cut into 1 1/2 inch cubes
Salt and freshly ground pepper


Sounds to me like your meat doesn't have any fat to stand up to the
longish cooking. All the pork in the US that I've seen is very lean; it
was a revelation to move to Denmark and discover that yes, pork roasts can
have some marbling in them. See if you can find a local butcher who can
provide such a thing for you. Your dish will be the better for it. If
you can't get a roast, you might see if he can provide you with neck
cutlets, which have nice marbling, and when you cube the meat, don't trim
away all the fat.

And the recipe looks great, btw -- I'm going to try it!
-j


  #3 (permalink)  
Old 01-03-2007, 11:58 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 156
Default Torresmos (Portuguese Garlic Roasted Pork)

On Mar 1, 2:54 am, "King's Crown" wrote:
I make the below recipe once a year for my Portuguese husband. He loves it.
To me the meat is tough and dry, but very tasty. I've tried cooking it
less, but then you don't get the lovely browned flavor. Wondering if anyone
had any other suggestions to make it more tender and not so dry. I have my
MILs recipe, but she passed away 6 months after we were married and I never
got to do any cooking with her. Lynne

Torresmos (Portuguese Garlic Roasted Pork)

4-pound boneless pork butt, cut into 1 1/2 inch cubes
Salt and freshly ground pepper

Marinade
1/2 pound medium-hot red chiles, seeded and stemmed
1 tsp salt
4 tablespoons paprika, sweet or hot depending on preference
10 cloves garlic, chopped
1/2 cup white wine
1/4 cup red wine

Place the chiles and salt in the bowl of food processor fitted with a metal
blade and pulse until minced. In a large bowl, combine the minced chiles
with the remaining marinade ingredients. Add the pork pieces, turning to
coat well. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 24 hours.

Remove the pork from the marinade. Add the pork to large roasting pan
season with salt and pepper and cook in a preheated 375F (190C) oven for 1
hour. Turn the pork often to keep it moist. Reduce the heat to 325F (160C)
and cook an additional 15 to 20 minutes, or until the pork is nicely
browned. Serve with Classic Portuguese Beans.

Serves 6 to 8


Try covering the pan for the last half of the cooking.. and I'd use a
smaller, heavier pan.. sounds sort of like Mexican carnitas (oven
style)..

Ted

  #4 (permalink)  
Old 01-03-2007, 04:42 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 153
Default Torresmos (Portuguese Garlic Roasted Pork)


wrote in message
ps.com...
On Mar 1, 2:54 am, "King's Crown" wrote:
I make the below recipe once a year for my Portuguese husband. He loves
it.
To me the meat is tough and dry, but very tasty. I've tried cooking it
less, but then you don't get the lovely browned flavor. Wondering if
anyone
had any other suggestions to make it more tender and not so dry. I have
my
MILs recipe, but she passed away 6 months after we were married and I
never
got to do any cooking with her. Lynne

Torresmos (Portuguese Garlic Roasted Pork)

4-pound boneless pork butt, cut into 1 1/2 inch cubes
Salt and freshly ground pepper

Marinade
1/2 pound medium-hot red chiles, seeded and stemmed
1 tsp salt
4 tablespoons paprika, sweet or hot depending on preference
10 cloves garlic, chopped
1/2 cup white wine
1/4 cup red wine

Place the chiles and salt in the bowl of food processor fitted with a
metal
blade and pulse until minced. In a large bowl, combine the minced chiles
with the remaining marinade ingredients. Add the pork pieces, turning to
coat well. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 24 hours.

Remove the pork from the marinade. Add the pork to large roasting pan
season with salt and pepper and cook in a preheated 375F (190C) oven for
1
hour. Turn the pork often to keep it moist. Reduce the heat to 325F
(160C)
and cook an additional 15 to 20 minutes, or until the pork is nicely
browned. Serve with Classic Portuguese Beans.

Serves 6 to 8


Try covering the pan for the last half of the cooking.. and I'd use a
smaller, heavier pan.. sounds sort of like Mexican carnitas (oven
style)..

Ted

I make great carnitas and it did cross my mind to do the cooking in a
similar fashion. I cook the pork in broth first until thoroughly done then
shred it and put in the oven for browning. This meat isn't marinaded
though. So, I wondered how I would precook it like the carnitas and still
get the marinaded flavor. I thought maybe I'd cook it in the marinade, but
afraid it would be TOO vinegary (is that a word ). If I cooked the
marinaded meat in broth would it defeat the purpose of the marinade and
dilute the flavor. So, then I thought maybe a watered down marinade/broth
might work. I'll just have to experiment it looks like.

Thanks for helping to point me in a direction!

Lynne


  #5 (permalink)  
Old 01-03-2007, 04:48 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
aem
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,524
Default Torresmos (Portuguese Garlic Roasted Pork)

On Feb 28, 11:54 pm, "King's Crown" wrote:
I make the below recipe once a year for my Portuguese husband. He loves it.
To me the meat is tough and dry, but very tasty. I've tried cooking it
less, but then you don't get the lovely browned flavor. Wondering if anyone
had any other suggestions to make it more tender and not so dry. I have my
MILs recipe, but she passed away 6 months after we were married and I never
got to do any cooking with her. Lynne

Torresmos (Portuguese Garlic Roasted Pork)
[snip ingredients]
Remove the pork from the marinade. Add the pork to large roasting pan
season with salt and pepper and cook in a preheated 375F (190C) oven for 1
hour. Turn the pork often to keep it moist. Reduce the heat to 325F (160C)
and cook an additional 15 to 20 minutes, or until the pork is nicely
browned. Serve with Classic Portuguese Beans.

You're roasting it dry and mostly at high heat so the chances of
drying it out are high. You might try longer, slower roasting, such
as 30 minutes at 375F - 400F followed by about 75 minutes at 325F.
At that point check for doneness and continue roasting only until just
cooked all the way through.

If that doesn't work you might try switching to browning on the
stovetop. After the marinating, dry the cubes and brown them well in
fat over medium high heat. Then cover the pot and place in a 325F
oven until done. Check in an hour. -aem


  #6 (permalink)  
Old 01-03-2007, 04:50 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 153
Default Torresmos (Portuguese Garlic Roasted Pork)


"jacqui{JB}" wrote in message
...
"King's Crown" wrote in message
. ..

I make the below recipe once a year for my Portuguese
husband. He loves it. To me the meat is tough and dry,
but very tasty. I've tried cooking it less, but then you don't
get the lovely browned flavor. Wondering if anyone had any
other suggestions to make it more tender and not so dry. I have my MILs
recipe, but she passed away 6 months after
we were married and I never got to do any cooking with her.

Torresmos (Portuguese Garlic Roasted Pork)

4-pound boneless pork butt, cut into 1 1/2 inch cubes
Salt and freshly ground pepper


Sounds to me like your meat doesn't have any fat to stand up to the
longish cooking. All the pork in the US that I've seen is very lean; it
was a revelation to move to Denmark and discover that yes, pork roasts can
have some marbling in them. See if you can find a local butcher who can
provide such a thing for you. Your dish will be the better for it. If
you can't get a roast, you might see if he can provide you with neck
cutlets, which have nice marbling, and when you cube the meat, don't trim
away all the fat.

And the recipe looks great, btw -- I'm going to try it!
-j

The recipe is great! Despite the dryness it gets scarfed down every time I
make it. I have to admit the pieces with the fat are my favorite and I pick
through to find them. DH hates fat on any meat. I've never seen someone so
meticulous about removing the slightest bit of fat from meat in stews, on
steaks, on chicken. It's kind of weird in my opinion. Not that I don't
remove fat myself, but the tiniest bit on a piece of stew meat doesn't make
me get out a knife and carve it up like a talented surgeon.

So, I love the idea of more marbling and will try it. We'll see what DH
does with the added fat. I may have to make two batches ... the tasty dried
out one for him and the tasty moist one for me.

Thanks for the suggestion!

Lynne


  #7 (permalink)  
Old 01-03-2007, 05:05 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 156
Default Torresmos (Portuguese Garlic Roasted Pork)

On Mar 1, 11:42 am, "King's Crown" wrote:
wrote in message

ps.com...
On Mar 1, 2:54 am, "King's Crown" wrote:





I make the below recipe once a year for my Portuguese husband. He loves
it.
To me the meat is tough and dry, but very tasty. I've tried cooking it
less, but then you don't get the lovely browned flavor. Wondering if
anyone
had any other suggestions to make it more tender and not so dry. I have
my
MILs recipe, but she passed away 6 months after we were married and I
never
got to do any cooking with her. Lynne


Torresmos (Portuguese Garlic Roasted Pork)


4-pound boneless pork butt, cut into 1 1/2 inch cubes
Salt and freshly ground pepper


Marinade
1/2 pound medium-hot red chiles, seeded and stemmed
1 tsp salt
4 tablespoons paprika, sweet or hot depending on preference
10 cloves garlic, chopped
1/2 cup white wine
1/4 cup red wine


Place the chiles and salt in the bowl of food processor fitted with a
metal
blade and pulse until minced. In a large bowl, combine the minced chiles
with the remaining marinade ingredients. Add the pork pieces, turning to
coat well. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 24 hours.


Remove the pork from the marinade. Add the pork to large roasting pan
season with salt and pepper and cook in a preheated 375F (190C) oven for
1
hour. Turn the pork often to keep it moist. Reduce the heat to 325F
(160C)
and cook an additional 15 to 20 minutes, or until the pork is nicely
browned. Serve with Classic Portuguese Beans.


Serves 6 to 8


Try covering the pan for the last half of the cooking.. and I'd use a
smaller, heavier pan.. sounds sort of like Mexican carnitas (oven
style)..

Ted

I make great carnitas and it did cross my mind to do the cooking in a
similar fashion. I cook the pork in broth first until thoroughly done then
shred it and put in the oven for browning. This meat isn't marinaded
though. So, I wondered how I would precook it like the carnitas and still
get the marinaded flavor. I thought maybe I'd cook it in the marinade, but
afraid it would be TOO vinegary (is that a word ). If I cooked the
marinaded meat in broth would it defeat the purpose of the marinade and
dilute the flavor. So, then I thought maybe a watered down marinade/broth
might work. I'll just have to experiment it looks like.

Thanks for helping to point me in a direction!

Lynne-


The seasoning is not far from one of the N'Carolina bbq styles. Maybe
there's a Melungeon/Portuguese influence on NC 'cue.

Ted

  #8 (permalink)  
Old 01-03-2007, 05:38 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 153
Default Torresmos (Portuguese Garlic Roasted Pork)


"aem" wrote in message
ups.com...
On Feb 28, 11:54 pm, "King's Crown" wrote:
I make the below recipe once a year for my Portuguese husband. He loves
it.
To me the meat is tough and dry, but very tasty. I've tried cooking it
less, but then you don't get the lovely browned flavor. Wondering if
anyone
had any other suggestions to make it more tender and not so dry. I have
my
MILs recipe, but she passed away 6 months after we were married and I
never
got to do any cooking with her. Lynne

Torresmos (Portuguese Garlic Roasted Pork)
[snip ingredients]
Remove the pork from the marinade. Add the pork to large roasting pan
season with salt and pepper and cook in a preheated 375F (190C) oven for
1
hour. Turn the pork often to keep it moist. Reduce the heat to 325F
(160C)
and cook an additional 15 to 20 minutes, or until the pork is nicely
browned. Serve with Classic Portuguese Beans.

You're roasting it dry and mostly at high heat so the chances of

drying it out are high. You might try longer, slower roasting, such
as 30 minutes at 375F - 400F followed by about 75 minutes at 325F.
At that point check for doneness and continue roasting only until just
cooked all the way through.

If that doesn't work you might try switching to browning on the
stovetop. After the marinating, dry the cubes and brown them well in
fat over medium high heat. Then cover the pot and place in a 325F
oven until done. Check in an hour. -aem

What surprises me is the meat is practically floating in liquid all the way
to the end. I figure it's all the juice from the meat. I will give the
meat less heat at the higher temp. As it does look done at the 30 minute
mark. After that it's just needing to tenderize and get some browned
flavor.

Thanks,
Lynne



  #9 (permalink)  
Old 01-03-2007, 06:15 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,944
Default Torresmos (Portuguese Garlic Roasted Pork)

On Thu, 1 Mar 2007 09:38:38 -0800, "King's Crown"
wrote:

What surprises me is the meat is practically floating in liquid all the way
to the end. I figure it's all the juice from the meat. I will give the
meat less heat at the higher temp. As it does look done at the 30 minute
mark. After that it's just needing to tenderize and get some browned
flavor.


Where are you getting your meat? If this is happening, I would check
to see that the pork is not adulterated with a saline solution. A lot
of places nowadays you can't find pork that isn't treated like this.
Especially Walmart.

Christine
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 01-03-2007, 07:08 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,879
Default Torresmos (Portuguese Garlic Roasted Pork)

King's Crown wrote:
I make the below recipe once a year for my Portuguese husband. He loves it.
To me the meat is tough and dry, but very tasty. I've tried cooking it
less, but then you don't get the lovely browned flavor. Wondering if anyone
had any other suggestions to make it more tender and not so dry. I have my
MILs recipe, but she passed away 6 months after we were married and I never
got to do any cooking with her. Lynne

Torresmos (Portuguese Garlic Roasted Pork)

(recipe snipped)


Interesting, Lynne. My grandmother used to make torresmos by rendering
what was mostly pork fat (that had been marinated) until all that was
left was "cracklings".

In my experience, most meats are served "well-done" in Portuguese cuisine.

The strange thing about Portuguese cooking is that it is a very small
country but recipes change tremendously from one town to the next and
from one family to the next, and this doesn't even include Madeira and
the Azores Islands.

gloria p
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 01-03-2007, 08:32 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 153
Default Torresmos (Portuguese Garlic Roasted Pork)


"Puester" wrote in message
...
King's Crown wrote:
I make the below recipe once a year for my Portuguese husband. He loves
it. To me the meat is tough and dry, but very tasty. I've tried cooking
it less, but then you don't get the lovely browned flavor. Wondering if
anyone had any other suggestions to make it more tender and not so dry.
I have my MILs recipe, but she passed away 6 months after we were married
and I never got to do any cooking with her. Lynne

Torresmos (Portuguese Garlic Roasted Pork)

(recipe snipped)


Interesting, Lynne. My grandmother used to make torresmos by rendering
what was mostly pork fat (that had been marinated) until all that was left
was "cracklings".

In my experience, most meats are served "well-done" in Portuguese cuisine.

The strange thing about Portuguese cooking is that it is a very small
country but recipes change tremendously from one town to the next and from
one family to the next, and this doesn't even include Madeira and the
Azores Islands.

gloria p


They are from the Azores. I also made a Portuguese beans recipe last night
and my American taste buds thought it needed something to perk up the
flavor. My husband tasted them and said they were great reminded him of his
mother's and grandmother's beans. So, I said I'd leave them as is since he
enjoyed them so much.

Lynne


  #12 (permalink)  
Old 01-03-2007, 08:33 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 153
Default Torresmos (Portuguese Garlic Roasted Pork)


"Christine Dabney" wrote in message
...
On Thu, 1 Mar 2007 09:38:38 -0800, "King's Crown"
wrote:

What surprises me is the meat is practically floating in liquid all the
way
to the end. I figure it's all the juice from the meat. I will give the
meat less heat at the higher temp. As it does look done at the 30 minute
mark. After that it's just needing to tenderize and get some browned
flavor.


Where are you getting your meat? If this is happening, I would check
to see that the pork is not adulterated with a saline solution. A lot
of places nowadays you can't find pork that isn't treated like this.
Especially Walmart.

Christine


No saline in it. I learned that years ago when my cousin cooked a pork
roast from Costco. It was tasty, but SO salty. My hands swelled up
tremendously. It took me 3 days to get all that sodium out of my system.

Lynne


  #13 (permalink)  
Old 21-03-2007, 01:12 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Torresmos (Portuguese Garlic Roasted Pork)

My name is David Leite, and I'm the author of the below recipe
http://www.leitesculinaria.com/recip...torresmos.html and it can
be found on my Web site, Leite's Culinaria. (BTW, you really should
credit the author of any recipe you use; they'reall copyrighted.)

Have you made it according to the directions? I think you'll find that
the meat isn't tough or dry if you're careful to cook it to the
specified temperature. Tradtionally, these kind of dishes are cooked
for a long time, but in liquid. Cooking to 165F will help.

David Leite
Leite's Culinaria
http://www.leitesculinaria.com

On Mar 1, 1:05 pm, wrote:
On Mar 1, 11:42 am, "King's Crown" wrote:

wrote in message


ups.com...
On Mar 1, 2:54 am, "King's Crown" wrote:


I make the below recipe once a year for my Portuguese husband. He loves
it.
To me the meat is tough and dry, but very tasty. I've tried cooking it
less, but then you don't get the lovely browned flavor. Wondering if
anyone
had any other suggestions to make it more tender and not so dry. I have
my
MILs recipe, but she passed away 6 months after we were married and I
never
got to do any cooking with her. Lynne


Torresmos (Portuguese Garlic Roasted Pork)


4-pound boneless pork butt, cut into 1 1/2 inch cubes
Salt and freshly ground pepper


Marinade
1/2 pound medium-hot red chiles, seeded and stemmed
1 tsp salt
4 tablespoons paprika, sweet or hot depending on preference
10 cloves garlic, chopped
1/2 cup white wine
1/4 cup red wine


Place the chiles and salt in the bowl of food processor fitted with a
metal
blade and pulse until minced. In a large bowl, combine the minced chiles
with the remaining marinade ingredients. Add the pork pieces, turning to
coat well. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 24 hours.


Remove the pork from the marinade. Add the pork to large roasting pan
season with salt and pepper and cook in a preheated 375F (190C) oven for
1
hour. Turn the pork often to keep it moist. Reduce the heat to 325F
(160C)
and cook an additional 15 to 20 minutes, or until the pork is nicely
browned. Serve with Classic Portuguese Beans.


Serves 6 to 8


Try covering the pan for the last half of the cooking.. and I'd use a
smaller, heavier pan.. sounds sort of like Mexican carnitas (oven
style)..


Ted


I make great carnitas and it did cross my mind to do the cooking in a
similar fashion. I cook the pork in broth first until thoroughly done then
shred it and put in the oven for browning. This meat isn't marinaded
though. So, I wondered how I would precook it like the carnitas and still
get the marinaded flavor. I thought maybe I'd cook it in the marinade, but
afraid it would be TOO vinegary (is that a word ). If I cooked the
marinaded meat in broth would it defeat the purpose of the marinade and
dilute the flavor. So, then I thought maybe a watered down marinade/broth
might work. I'll just have to experiment it looks like.


Thanks for helping to point me in a direction!


Lynne-


The seasoning is not far from one of the N'Carolina bbq styles. Maybe
there's a Melungeon/Portuguese influence on NC 'cue.

Ted



 




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