Wine (alt.food.wine) Devoted to the discussion of wine and wine-related topics. A place to read and comment about wines, wine and food matching, storage systems, wine paraphernalia, etc. In general, any topic related to wine is valid fodder for the group.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 25-08-2006, 09:35 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 35
Default Introduction

Hello all

Since I've asked a couple questions recently, I thought it would be a
good idea to introduce myself.

I'm a married guy (wife and four kids) in southern Vermont, USA. I've
loved wine since I was old enough to drink it, though never really got
too far into it. Started a very small collection, totaled about a case,
about six years ago. At the time I liked Beaujolais-Villages, some
light Cabs, and number one was Alsatian Gewurztraminer. After moving to
VT and keeping only a few bottles from the collection, I found no one to
enjoy wine with. Wife doesn't drink at all.

Several months ago, my brother-in-law watched Sideways. He was so
inspired by it that he came to visit, and declared we will now be wine
aficionados. OK, no problem here. Since then, every week I have hosted
a wine tasting/family meal for both of our families. Which is
excellent, I love to cook, and of course wine :-)

The good part of this is obvious - someone to enjoy wine with. Hardest
part was getting brother-in-law off of the Pinot kick. Tasting pinots
side by side every week gets a little tedious. Sideways, I love you and
hate you... But thankfully now we have branched out into different
wines. When I purchase a bottle of white, it's usually not embraced
with open arms, though it does get tasted and enjoyed. The rose I have
for today is really going to cause a stir...

I happen to prefer reds as long as they are not too tannic, pretty much
equal preference between a French style and California style. For
whites, I still enjoy the rose and lychee nose of a good Gewurz, and
Sauvignon Blanc on occasion. Only had one Chard which I enjoyed, but it
was really, really good. I'm learning more about French wines, but
Italian wines are still a mystery to me. And mostly I stick to the
mid-grade wines, with the rare foray into the upper-mid grade offerings.

After I get some more experience with coherent tasting notes, I'll be
posting them.

-ben

  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-08-2006, 08:46 AM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 38
Default Introduction


Hello Ben,

Be you welcome. Grab a chair and call the cat a *******. Never mind
alligator. Did you bring some chocolates?

Seriously, no doubt you'll fit in very well. I am personally a great fan of
Alsace Gwz, even though these days I drink more Pinot Gris.

Cheers

Nils GUstaF


  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-08-2006, 01:21 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,554
Default Introduction

Welcome, Ben. When you get around to notes tell us about any good VT
cheese you run across, too.

  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-08-2006, 02:26 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 383
Default Introduction

On Fri, 25 Aug 2006 16:35:14 -0400, Ben Snyder
wrote:

Hello all

Since I've asked a couple questions recently, I thought it would be a
good idea to introduce myself.


A rare example of social grace which is increasingly hard to come by
these days. Welcome aboard.

I'm a married guy (wife and four kids) in southern Vermont, USA. I've
loved wine since I was old enough to drink it, though never really got
too far into it. Started a very small collection, totaled about a case,
about six years ago. At the time I liked Beaujolais-Villages, some
light Cabs, and number one was Alsatian Gewurztraminer. After moving to
VT and keeping only a few bottles from the collection, I found no one to
enjoy wine with. Wife doesn't drink at all.


I'm a fan of Alsace Gewurz and Reisling as well. (Someone will jump up
shortly from the Euro contingent to point out that Alsatian is a
dog--what we in the colonies usually refer to as a German Shepherd.)

Does you wife not drink because of distaste for alcohol or because she
doesn't like wine? If the former, then that's fine. If the latter, she
might be eased into enjoyment as you explore the world of wine. Get
into the habit of wine with meals and always offer her a small portion
of the current bottle. She may find something she enjoys. Meanwhile,
you maintain that rare social grace.

Several months ago, my brother-in-law watched Sideways. He was so
inspired by it that he came to visit, and declared we will now be wine
aficionados. OK, no problem here. Since then, every week I have hosted
a wine tasting/family meal for both of our families. Which is
excellent, I love to cook, and of course wine :-)

The good part of this is obvious - someone to enjoy wine with. Hardest
part was getting brother-in-law off of the Pinot kick. Tasting pinots
side by side every week gets a little tedious. Sideways, I love you and
hate you... But thankfully now we have branched out into different
wines. When I purchase a bottle of white, it's usually not embraced
with open arms, though it does get tasted and enjoyed. The rose I have
for today is really going to cause a stir...


Sideways did a lot for the wine community--some of it good and some
bad. Merlot, for example, can now be purchased for less but must be
consummed from a brown paper bag to keep the varietal name
undiscovered. Pinot Noir, OTOH, has continued to soar in price for
quality wine.

I happen to prefer reds as long as they are not too tannic, pretty much
equal preference between a French style and California style. For
whites, I still enjoy the rose and lychee nose of a good Gewurz, and
Sauvignon Blanc on occasion. Only had one Chard which I enjoyed, but it
was really, really good. I'm learning more about French wines, but
Italian wines are still a mystery to me. And mostly I stick to the
mid-grade wines, with the rare foray into the upper-mid grade offerings.


I've found that a good way to discover new wines is to find a
restaurant that you enjoy which has a good, affordable wine list. You
pay more obviously than buying directly from the wine store, but you
benefit from having a knowledgeable source doing the research and
filtering the list down to quality offerings. I particularly
benefitted from an Italian upscale chain (Biaggi's) which had a
"reserve" wine list with some excellent examples of Barolo,
Barberesco, Chianti Classico and Super-Tuscans. I used to joke that
dinner at Biaggi always cost me several hundred dollars because I
would inevitably return home to order a case of something I'd tried at
dinner.

After I get some more experience with coherent tasting notes, I'll be
posting them.

So many wines, so little time. Prosit.

Ed Rasimus
Fighter Pilot (USAF-Ret)
"When Thunder Rolled"
www.thunderchief.org
www.thundertales.blogspot.com


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-08-2006, 04:28 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 197
Default Introduction

Ed Rasimus wrote in
news
I'm a fan of Alsace Gewurz and Reisling as well. (Someone will jump up
shortly from the Euro contingent to point out that Alsatian is a
dog--what we in the colonies usually refer to as a German Shepherd.)


Uhh, would that not be a Berger Belgique to which you refer?

--
Joseph Coulter
Cruises and Vacations
http://www.josephcoulter.com/

  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-08-2006, 05:51 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 35
Default Introduction

DaleW wrote:
Welcome, Ben. When you get around to notes tell us about any good VT
cheese you run across, too.


Definitely will. I used to try staying away from local cheese and
trying more exotic things, but always come back to the old standard
sharp cheddars. The absolute best so far is this three-year aged
cheddar from Cabot. The only places I've seen it is from a local meat
market, but probably available in other places as well.

Manchego and erhaki are my favorite cheese overall, though sharp cheddar
is now my favorite with almost any type of wine.

-ben
  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-08-2006, 06:03 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 35
Default Introduction

Ed Rasimus wrote:
--snip--

I'm a fan of Alsace Gewurz and Reisling as well. (Someone will jump up
shortly from the Euro contingent to point out that Alsatian is a
dog--what we in the colonies usually refer to as a German Shepherd.)


Ah, maybe I should add 'wet Alsatian' to my list of 'bad
characteristics' :-)

Forgot about Alsace Riesling. Very good, only had about two so far but
love 'em.


Does you wife not drink because of distaste for alcohol or because she
doesn't like wine? If the former, then that's fine. If the latter, she
might be eased into enjoyment as you explore the world of wine. Get
into the habit of wine with meals and always offer her a small portion
of the current bottle. She may find something she enjoys. Meanwhile,
you maintain that rare social grace.


My wife is a good sport, she's tried almost every wine I have, but in
general doesn't like wine. The only ones she will drink more than a sip
of is a sweet Gewurz (like Duck Walk Vineyard's ice wine), and there is
one other which I can't remember. Another gewurz, a bit sweet and had
the slightest bit of bubbles though it was considered a still wine.
Reds, she absolutely hates, even Beaujolais Nouveau. Too strong in flavor.

Several years ago, I bought a bottle of Syrah. Jekel. Didn't let it
breathe at all, poured two glasses and let her try first. She choked,
and for a moment though I was really trying to poison her. Until I
tried a sip too. Way to tannic, it was either a really bad Syrah or
should have aged a bit longer and then aired before drinking.

Several months ago, my brother-in-law watched Sideways. He was so
inspired by it that he came to visit, and declared we will now be wine
aficionados. OK, no problem here. Since then, every week I have hosted
a wine tasting/family meal for both of our families. Which is
excellent, I love to cook, and of course wine :-)

The good part of this is obvious - someone to enjoy wine with. Hardest
part was getting brother-in-law off of the Pinot kick. Tasting pinots
side by side every week gets a little tedious. Sideways, I love you and
hate you... But thankfully now we have branched out into different
wines. When I purchase a bottle of white, it's usually not embraced
with open arms, though it does get tasted and enjoyed. The rose I have
for today is really going to cause a stir...


Sideways did a lot for the wine community--some of it good and some
bad. Merlot, for example, can now be purchased for less but must be
consummed from a brown paper bag to keep the varietal name
undiscovered. Pinot Noir, OTOH, has continued to soar in price for
quality wine.


Yeah, I had to hide the bottles of Merlot I served to my brother-in-law.

I happen to prefer reds as long as they are not too tannic, pretty much
equal preference between a French style and California style. For
whites, I still enjoy the rose and lychee nose of a good Gewurz, and
Sauvignon Blanc on occasion. Only had one Chard which I enjoyed, but it
was really, really good. I'm learning more about French wines, but
Italian wines are still a mystery to me. And mostly I stick to the
mid-grade wines, with the rare foray into the upper-mid grade offerings.


I've found that a good way to discover new wines is to find a
restaurant that you enjoy which has a good, affordable wine list. You
pay more obviously than buying directly from the wine store, but you
benefit from having a knowledgeable source doing the research and
filtering the list down to quality offerings. I particularly
benefitted from an Italian upscale chain (Biaggi's) which had a
"reserve" wine list with some excellent examples of Barolo,
Barberesco, Chianti Classico and Super-Tuscans. I used to joke that
dinner at Biaggi always cost me several hundred dollars because I
would inevitably return home to order a case of something I'd tried at
dinner.


One somewhat local wine merchant is amazing. He follows the rule of not
upselling (say you want to spend $20, he offers anything from $13-$19 or
so) and every selection he suggested based on very sketchy details has
been astounding. There's also a very well rated restaurant withing
walking distance which I plan to visit very soon. Wine Spectator rated
their wine list very well also.

-ben
  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-08-2006, 07:33 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 365
Default Introduction

"Joseph Coulter" skrev i meddelandet
. 97.136...
Ed Rasimus wrote in
news
I'm a fan of Alsace Gewurz and Reisling as well. (Someone will jump up
shortly from the Euro contingent to point out that Alsatian is a
dog--what we in the colonies usually refer to as a German Shepherd.)


Uhh, would that not be a Berger Belgique to which you refer?



THis is a spin-off from previous belligerence in the Old Mother COntinent
(=Europe) - calling the shepherd Alsatian rather than German - slightly like
calling Missy Queeny's family Mountbatten rather than Battenberg. No
worries[1], today we are all good EU-citizens, including the Alsatian
doggies.

Cheers

Nils Gustaf

[1] I am reallly really getting into the atmosphere for this Oz voyage, and
no mistake, but you drongos all noticed. She'll be right.

--
Respond to nils dot lindgren at drchips dot se




  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-08-2006, 08:04 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 171
Default Introduction

Ben Snyder wrote:
Forgot about Alsace Riesling. Very good, only had about two so far but
love 'em.


Welcome to the newsgroup. And I'm also very fond of Riesling. Only
tried a few from Alsace and Germany, I'm more familiar/fond of the
Australian and New Zealand versions of it (particularly those from
Marlborough & Waipara).

Like Gewurz as well, but not had enough in the past of my own good.
Perhaps because usually when I go for whites, it's either Riesling or
Sauvignon blanc.

Reds, she absolutely hates, even Beaujolais Nouveau. Too strong in flavor.


I'd be interested in seeing the sorts of reds you/she have tasted. Any
Aussie ones there? There are a lot of Aussie reds out there that are
'easy drinking' wines, not too strong in flavour but with a good palate
and character - and many are very reasonably priced too.

Salil

  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-08-2006, 04:24 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 35
Default Introduction

Salil wrote:
Ben Snyder wrote:
Forgot about Alsace Riesling. Very good, only had about two so far but
love 'em.


Welcome to the newsgroup. And I'm also very fond of Riesling. Only
tried a few from Alsace and Germany, I'm more familiar/fond of the
Australian and New Zealand versions of it (particularly those from
Marlborough & Waipara).


I'll definitely try them out.

Like Gewurz as well, but not had enough in the past of my own good.
Perhaps because usually when I go for whites, it's either Riesling or
Sauvignon blanc.

Reds, she absolutely hates, even Beaujolais Nouveau. Too strong in flavor.


I'd be interested in seeing the sorts of reds you/she have tasted. Any
Aussie ones there? There are a lot of Aussie reds out there that are
'easy drinking' wines, not too strong in flavour but with a good palate
and character - and many are very reasonably priced too.


I've had a few Australian shiraz, latest was a Jacob's Creek. Wife
wouldn't touch it - I can't think of a red lighter than Beaujolais
Nouveau.

A few days ago she tried a sip of a Fleurie. There was a lot more in
the nose than in flavor, though I enjoyed it. Very straightforward, not
complex, but unique. Nose of orchid and iris. She tried it, and could
tolerate it but did not enjoy it.

Methinks I'll be exploring more white wines so she can maybe find
something she enjoys.

-ben
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-08-2006, 04:58 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 629
Default Introduction


Ben Snyder wrote:
Hello all

Since I've asked a couple questions recently, I thought it would be a
good idea to introduce myself.

I'm a married guy (wife and four kids) in southern Vermont, USA. I've
loved wine since I was old enough to drink it, though never really got
too far into it. Started a very small collection, totaled about a case,
about six years ago. At the time I liked Beaujolais-Villages, some
light Cabs, and number one was Alsatian Gewurztraminer. After moving to
VT and keeping only a few bottles from the collection, I found no one to
enjoy wine with. Wife doesn't drink at all.

Several months ago, my brother-in-law watched Sideways. He was so
inspired by it that he came to visit, and declared we will now be wine
aficionados. OK, no problem here. Since then, every week I have hosted
a wine tasting/family meal for both of our families. Which is
excellent, I love to cook, and of course wine :-)

The good part of this is obvious - someone to enjoy wine with. Hardest
part was getting brother-in-law off of the Pinot kick. Tasting pinots
side by side every week gets a little tedious. Sideways, I love you and
hate you... But thankfully now we have branched out into different
wines. When I purchase a bottle of white, it's usually not embraced
with open arms, though it does get tasted and enjoyed. The rose I have
for today is really going to cause a stir...

I happen to prefer reds as long as they are not too tannic, pretty much
equal preference between a French style and California style. For
whites, I still enjoy the rose and lychee nose of a good Gewurz, and
Sauvignon Blanc on occasion. Only had one Chard which I enjoyed, but it
was really, really good. I'm learning more about French wines, but
Italian wines are still a mystery to me. And mostly I stick to the
mid-grade wines, with the rare foray into the upper-mid grade offerings.

After I get some more experience with coherent tasting notes, I'll be
posting them.

-ben


Typical Americans. They think that 'tasting' is the way to learn about
wine. Stop the tasting and start drinking them, with food. Do not
'evaluate' the wines. Drink them and enjoy them. Note which ones you
liked best, and do nothing else. Do not 'over-think' this. Do you make
'tasting notes' of every chicken you eat?

Damn!

  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-08-2006, 06:02 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 262
Default Introduction

Do you make 'tasting notes' of every chicken you eat?

Well put.

But the answer is yes, after a fashion. Certainly the chef of the house
does (and for that I'm grateful!). When cooking, one needs to select
herbs, spices, sauce ingredients, accompaniments... and all these things
interplay into each other to make one meal memorable and another one
so-so. The next time you're going to prepare chicken, do you poke
around your spice cabinet at random? I don't, neither does my wife. We
know what works well together, and what works better with lamb instead.

She makes "tasting notes" for chicken (etc) and has compiled a rather
extensive (and wonderful) handwritten cookbook, which I continually
benefit from. She also is very good at remembering stuff, and at
identifying the sources of flavors when we go out to eat, so she can
duplicate and improve upon what she's already had.

I see no difference between this and keeping notes of what wines you
liked with what foods, and why. It's the "why" part that will lead you
to new combinations that will work nicely, and help you avoid the ones
that probably won't. And since, as my choir director is fond of saying,
"elephants have memories, people have pencils", tasting notes can be
quite useful in that regard.

Tasting notes are especially useful if you are laying away a case or two
of something for a few years, because in a few years you'll forget what
kind of food it goes best with. It is less useful if this is the only
bottle of whatever is is you're drinking, and you're not going to be
able to get another even if you liked it.

Sharing tasting notes is also a good way to introduce others to wines
you liked (or didn't) and why, and what it is likely to go with.

I used to think that this business of "what wine goes with what food"
was overblown poppycock, until one day when I had one of my favorite
whites (I forget which) and was quite disappointed in it. I forget what
I was having with it but there were several items. I took out the wine
reccomendation list from Telluride Restaurant in Stamford (my first
source and a favorite restaurant), and sure enough, I had some "food
foes" of this wine on the plate, and some "food friendly" choices too.
So, I took the opportunity to taste the wine with each of the courses.

It made a world of difference. I was blown away. With one of the
foods, the wine was restored to its former glory. With another of them,
it was rendered bland and uninteresting - and it was the same wine from
the same glass.

Alas, I did not take notes.

I thought I remembered pine nuts and a sauvignon blanc were part of the
deal, but my Telluride listing does not show that combination, so that
wasn't it. And now I'll never know (and will be unable to share).

But, do try it with other foods. Go to
http://www.telluriderestaurant.com/wines.php
and pick out a wine, and have it with some "food friendly" foods and
some "food foes" at the same time, and compare.

Keep notes. (ps - it works for Italian wines too)

Jose
--
The monkey turns the crank and thinks he's making the music.
for Email, make the obvious change in the address.
  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-08-2006, 06:57 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 35
Default Introduction

UC wrote:
Ben Snyder wrote:
Hello all

Since I've asked a couple questions recently, I thought it would be a
good idea to introduce myself.

I'm a married guy (wife and four kids) in southern Vermont, USA. I've
loved wine since I was old enough to drink it, though never really got
too far into it. Started a very small collection, totaled about a case,
about six years ago. At the time I liked Beaujolais-Villages, some
light Cabs, and number one was Alsatian Gewurztraminer. After moving to
VT and keeping only a few bottles from the collection, I found no one to
enjoy wine with. Wife doesn't drink at all.

Several months ago, my brother-in-law watched Sideways. He was so
inspired by it that he came to visit, and declared we will now be wine
aficionados. OK, no problem here. Since then, every week I have hosted
a wine tasting/family meal for both of our families. Which is
excellent, I love to cook, and of course wine :-)

The good part of this is obvious - someone to enjoy wine with. Hardest
part was getting brother-in-law off of the Pinot kick. Tasting pinots
side by side every week gets a little tedious. Sideways, I love you and
hate you... But thankfully now we have branched out into different
wines. When I purchase a bottle of white, it's usually not embraced
with open arms, though it does get tasted and enjoyed. The rose I have
for today is really going to cause a stir...

I happen to prefer reds as long as they are not too tannic, pretty much
equal preference between a French style and California style. For
whites, I still enjoy the rose and lychee nose of a good Gewurz, and
Sauvignon Blanc on occasion. Only had one Chard which I enjoyed, but it
was really, really good. I'm learning more about French wines, but
Italian wines are still a mystery to me. And mostly I stick to the
mid-grade wines, with the rare foray into the upper-mid grade offerings.

After I get some more experience with coherent tasting notes, I'll be
posting them.

-ben


Typical Americans. They think that 'tasting' is the way to learn about
wine. Stop the tasting and start drinking them, with food. Do not
'evaluate' the wines. Drink them and enjoy them. Note which ones you
liked best, and do nothing else. Do not 'over-think' this. Do you make
'tasting notes' of every chicken you eat?

Damn!


Is there such a thing as a 'typical American?' If so, please enlighten
me. I am absolutely tired of Americans being bashed because of
prejudices against us by people of other cultures.

I do make tasting notes of particularly complex dishes that I make, yes.
The purpose is so that I can repeat the experience. Simple fare like
hamburgers, of course not. Key points are complexity and expense - if a
wine is expensive then I will take good notes so I can either avoid or
purchase what I like in the future. Not taking notes can lead to poor
choices, and wasted money. As I get better at knowing my likes and
dislikes, my notes get shorter.

-ben



Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
introduction wildflower General Cooking 6 27-02-2009 03:48 PM
New Guy Introduction [email protected] Sourdough 4 15-02-2008 08:47 AM
An Introduction, Maybe? Glasswalker General Cooking 59 05-06-2007 04:18 PM
introduction Ed Johnson General Cooking 0 13-05-2007 10:21 PM
Introduction Chase Pearson General 3 10-03-2005 01:33 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:36 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017