Tea (rec.drink.tea) Discussion relating to tea, the world's second most consumed beverage (after water), made by infusing or boiling the leaves of the tea plant (C. sinensis or close relatives) in water.

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Old 16-09-2007, 11:00 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Wu Yi Yan Cha Bing - A Lush Oolong! And The Smoothest Nai Xiang (milk) Oolong!

My small treasure of a box arrived Wednesday from Teaspring.
Some more wonderful '93 loose Menghai, a Nai Xiang Oolong and a brand
new experience for me - an Oolong Wu Yi Cha Bing.
Firstly, the bing itself is quite beautiful - pressed with characters,
mountains, and stars and the aroma is intense - very, sweet and
"baking chocolate". The disk colour is deep and rich - teakwood brown
with tawny highlights.
Being quite new to this experience, I broke off a piece as I would a
pu-erh cha bing; although this disk is flat. Teaspring suggested using
1/2 small porcelain pot of leaves and doing a 1 minute infusion at
oolong temp.
This wonder of a tea held up strongly to multiple infusions becoming
toastier, more chocolate and sweeter.
The tea is a quite a bargain $9.90 and I'm assuming it will last for
quite a while.
I have to admit - this may just become my very favourite Autumn
indulgence!
Also, in this box, Nai Xiang Oolong. This one is probably with
smoothest of the "milk" oolongs I've tastes and the flavour, although
very delicate, more pristine and clear in the "milky/silky" tones.
A lovely soft green and very sweet with virtually no rough green
vegetal edges. Small leaves and a refreshing sweetness that did not
diminish with multiple infusions.
I've tried two "silk" Oolongs from red Blossom and the Taiwan version
was much more pronounced a flavour.
I had been particularly fond of the "Milk Oolong" from Holy Mountain
since the flavour was so pronounced. But, both Red Blossoms' "Taiwan
Silk" and Holy Mountain's "Milk" lack the complexities and nuances of
sweet "milkiness" that appear in the Nai Xiang from Teaspring.
Shen


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Old 17-09-2007, 08:31 AM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Wu Yi Yan Cha Bing - A Lush Oolong! And The Smoothest Nai Xiang (milk) Oolong!

On Sep 16, 3:00 pm, Shen wrote:
My small treasure of a box arrived Wednesday from Teaspring.
Some more wonderful '93 loose Menghai, a Nai Xiang Oolong and a brand
new experience for me - an Oolong Wu Yi Cha Bing.
Firstly, the bing itself is quite beautiful - pressed with characters,
mountains, and stars and the aroma is intense - very, sweet and
"baking chocolate". The disk colour is deep and rich - teakwood brown
with tawny highlights.
Being quite new to this experience, I broke off a piece as I would a
pu-erh cha bing; although this disk is flat. Teaspring suggested using
1/2 small porcelain pot of leaves and doing a 1 minute infusion at
oolong temp.
This wonder of a tea held up strongly to multiple infusions becoming
toastier, more chocolate and sweeter.
The tea is a quite a bargain $9.90 and I'm assuming it will last for
quite a while.
I have to admit - this may just become my very favourite Autumn
indulgence!
Also, in this box, Nai Xiang Oolong. This one is probably with
smoothest of the "milk" oolongs I've tastes and the flavour, although
very delicate, more pristine and clear in the "milky/silky" tones.
A lovely soft green and very sweet with virtually no rough green
vegetal edges. Small leaves and a refreshing sweetness that did not
diminish with multiple infusions.
I've tried two "silk" Oolongs from red Blossom and the Taiwan version
was much more pronounced a flavour.
I had been particularly fond of the "Milk Oolong" from Holy Mountain
since the flavour was so pronounced. But, both Red Blossoms' "Taiwan
Silk" and Holy Mountain's "Milk" lack the complexities and nuances of
sweet "milkiness" that appear in the Nai Xiang from Teaspring.
Shen


Saw those two items a week or two ago and they piqued my interest.
Haven't got around to getting it, though. I heard nai xiang is a mass
favorite in Taiwan.

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Old 17-09-2007, 04:17 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Wu Yi Yan Cha Bing - A Lush Oolong! And The Smoothest Nai Xiang (milk) Oolong!

Hello SHen!
This is wonderful news. I have been wanting some new stuff. I, once
upon a time had heard of an oolong bing. Now I know, and the oolong
milky seems just what I have been oolong-ing for. I had once had one
tasted almost like a coconut flan. I cannot remember where it came
from, but this one sounds very nice. Thank you for your info... I DO
apreciate it.
Jenn

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Old 17-09-2007, 05:24 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Wu Yi Yan Cha Bing - A Lush Oolong! And The Smoothest Nai Xiang (milk) Oolong!

Funny you mention those wuyi bing. I bought a few out of curiosity
from the "wuyi star" brand store in shanghai, but i haven't tried them
yet. The girl at the store said they're all shui xian of different
grades. Now i'm curious to actually try them.

I wonder if they'll age better or worse than loose wuyi?

~j


On Sep 17, 6:00 am, Shen wrote:
My small treasure of a box arrived Wednesday from Teaspring.
Some more wonderful '93 loose Menghai, a Nai Xiang Oolong and a brand
new experience for me - an Oolong Wu Yi Cha Bing.

[snip]
Shen



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Old 17-09-2007, 07:48 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Wu Yi Yan Cha Bing - A Lush Oolong! And The Smoothest Nai Xiang (milk) Oolong!

On Sep 17, 9:24 am, Jason F in Los Angeles
wrote:
Funny you mention those wuyi bing. I bought a few out of curiosity
from the "wuyi star" brand store in shanghai, but i haven't tried them
yet. The girl at the store said they're all shui xian of different
grades. Now i'm curious to actually try them.

I wonder if they'll age better or worse than loose wuyi?

~j

On Sep 17, 6:00 am, Shen wrote:

My small treasure of a box arrived Wednesday from Teaspring.
Some more wonderful '93 loose Menghai, a Nai Xiang Oolong and a brand
new experience for me - an Oolong Wu Yi Cha Bing.

[snip]
Shen


I just wrote to Daniel regarding just that - he said to store it as
you would any other Oolong and it will continue to age if kept out of
light, heat, cold etc (you know the drill).
I love the roasty-toasty flavour and will probably drink it through
the colder months, so no aging for me.
Shen




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Old 17-09-2007, 07:50 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Wu Yi Yan Cha Bing - A Lush Oolong! And The Smoothest Nai Xiang (milk) Oolong!

On Sep 17, 12:31 am, Phyll wrote:
On Sep 16, 3:00 pm, Shen wrote:



My small treasure of a box arrived Wednesday from Teaspring.
Some more wonderful '93 loose Menghai, a Nai Xiang Oolong and a brand
new experience for me - an Oolong Wu Yi Cha Bing.
Firstly, the bing itself is quite beautiful - pressed with characters,
mountains, and stars and the aroma is intense - very, sweet and
"baking chocolate". The disk colour is deep and rich - teakwood brown
with tawny highlights.
Being quite new to this experience, I broke off a piece as I would a
pu-erh cha bing; although this disk is flat. Teaspring suggested using
1/2 small porcelain pot of leaves and doing a 1 minute infusion at
oolong temp.
This wonder of a tea held up strongly to multiple infusions becoming
toastier, more chocolate and sweeter.
The tea is a quite a bargain $9.90 and I'm assuming it will last for
quite a while.
I have to admit - this may just become my very favourite Autumn
indulgence!
Also, in this box, Nai Xiang Oolong. This one is probably with
smoothest of the "milk" oolongs I've tastes and the flavour, although
very delicate, more pristine and clear in the "milky/silky" tones.
A lovely soft green and very sweet with virtually no rough green
vegetal edges. Small leaves and a refreshing sweetness that did not
diminish with multiple infusions.
I've tried two "silk" Oolongs from red Blossom and the Taiwan version
was much more pronounced a flavour.
I had been particularly fond of the "Milk Oolong" from Holy Mountain
since the flavour was so pronounced. But, both Red Blossoms' "Taiwan
Silk" and Holy Mountain's "Milk" lack the complexities and nuances of
sweet "milkiness" that appear in the Nai Xiang from Teaspring.
Shen


Saw those two items a week or two ago and they piqued my interest.
Haven't got around to getting it, though. I heard nai xiang is a mass
favorite in Taiwan.


Yes. They do seem to love it there, as I heard from Peter and Alice at
Red Blossom.
It has a "denseness" and a sweetness that I'm enjoying for now.
My second, third and fourth pots had more of a toasted, fine, aged
Oolong flavour than chocolatey.
It may have been the aroma I was "tasting" in my first go-round.
Shen

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Old 17-09-2007, 07:52 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Wu Yi Yan Cha Bing - A Lush Oolong! And The Smoothest Nai Xiang (milk) Oolong!

On Sep 17, 12:31 am, Phyll wrote:
On Sep 16, 3:00 pm, Shen wrote:



My small treasure of a box arrived Wednesday from Teaspring.
Some more wonderful '93 loose Menghai, a Nai Xiang Oolong and a brand
new experience for me - an Oolong Wu Yi Cha Bing.
Firstly, the bing itself is quite beautiful - pressed with characters,
mountains, and stars and the aroma is intense - very, sweet and
"baking chocolate". The disk colour is deep and rich - teakwood brown
with tawny highlights.
Being quite new to this experience, I broke off a piece as I would a
pu-erh cha bing; although this disk is flat. Teaspring suggested using
1/2 small porcelain pot of leaves and doing a 1 minute infusion at
oolong temp.
This wonder of a tea held up strongly to multiple infusions becoming
toastier, more chocolate and sweeter.
The tea is a quite a bargain $9.90 and I'm assuming it will last for
quite a while.
I have to admit - this may just become my very favourite Autumn
indulgence!
Also, in this box, Nai Xiang Oolong. This one is probably with
smoothest of the "milk" oolongs I've tastes and the flavour, although
very delicate, more pristine and clear in the "milky/silky" tones.
A lovely soft green and very sweet with virtually no rough green
vegetal edges. Small leaves and a refreshing sweetness that did not
diminish with multiple infusions.
I've tried two "silk" Oolongs from red Blossom and the Taiwan version
was much more pronounced a flavour.
I had been particularly fond of the "Milk Oolong" from Holy Mountain
since the flavour was so pronounced. But, both Red Blossoms' "Taiwan
Silk" and Holy Mountain's "Milk" lack the complexities and nuances of
sweet "milkiness" that appear in the Nai Xiang from Teaspring.
Shen


Saw those two items a week or two ago and they piqued my interest.
Haven't got around to getting it, though. I heard nai xiang is a mass
favorite in Taiwan.


Oops. I got that all messed up - it's the bing that's roasty-toasty,
noit the Nai Xiang. Went to bed very late and just not enough tea, as
yet, to communicate clearly.
Geez....I've really got to respect my limitations! (LOL!) In other
words, don't write about a cuppa 'til I've had a potta.
Shen

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Old 18-01-2008, 10:48 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Wu Yi Yan Cha Bing - A Lush Oolong! And The Smoothest Nai Xiang(milk) Oolong!

Shen's writing inspired me to try some of the same from Teaspring.

Shen wrote:
... a brand new experience for me - an Oolong Wu Yi Cha Bing. ...
This wonder of a tea held up strongly to multiple infusions becoming
toastier, more chocolate and sweeter. The tea is a quite a bargain
$9.90 and I'm assuming it will last for quite a while.


Agreed on all counts. Seems like a good price per ounce/gram for a
pretty good tea. Wonder if this way of packing makes it cheaper at the
producer end? I bought a few, intending to give them away if they were
good. Turned out they're very good, so I might keep most of them to test
ageability with and without occasional re-roasting. (Paper package won't
mind, I'm sure.)

This appears and tastes like a very highly fermented oolong, but not too
highly roasted - just what I've been seeking for long-term storage
experiments. Will get back to you all around 2018.

It was interesting to observe a "taste expectation" when brewing this
cake. It looks so much like a big-leaf shu pu mini-bing that it took a
moment extra for the distinctive Wuyi taste to arrive on first sip.

Also, in this box, Nai Xiang Oolong. This one is probably with
smoothest of the "milk" oolongs I've tastes and the flavour, although
very delicate, more pristine and clear in the "milky/silky" tones.


I agree. In fact, I believe it's the best milk oolong I've tried yet.
I've even brewed it under sloppy/abusive conditions, and always got good
results even though it's very green by my standards.

I also tried Teaspring's Bai Ji Guan, which is also one of the very best
I've tried. Were I not committed to Pu-erh in my oral drip these days,
this could be the every-sunday tipple while listening to Midnight Special.

-DM
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Old 19-01-2008, 01:43 AM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Wu Yi Yan Cha Bing - A Lush Oolong! And The Smoothest Nai Xiang(milk) Oolong!

On Jan 18, 2:48*pm, DogMa wrote:
Shen's writing inspired me to try some of the same from Teaspring.

Shen wrote:
... a brand new experience for me - an Oolong Wu Yi Cha Bing. ...
This wonder of a tea held up strongly to multiple infusions becoming
toastier, more chocolate and sweeter. The tea is a quite a bargain
$9.90 and I'm assuming it will last for quite a while.


Agreed on all counts. Seems like a good price per ounce/gram for a
pretty good tea. Wonder if this way of packing makes it cheaper at the
producer end? I bought a few, intending to give them away if they were
good. Turned out they're very good, so I might keep most of them to test
ageability with and without occasional re-roasting. (Paper package won't
mind, I'm sure.)

This appears and tastes like a very highly fermented oolong, but not too
highly roasted - just what I've been seeking for long-term storage
experiments. Will get back to you all around 2018.

It was interesting to observe a "taste expectation" when brewing this
cake. It looks so much like a big-leaf shu pu mini-bing that it took a
moment extra for the distinctive Wuyi taste to arrive on first sip.

Also, in this box, Nai Xiang Oolong. This one is probably with
smoothest of the "milk" oolongs I've tastes and the flavour, although
*very delicate, more pristine and clear in the "milky/silky" tones.


I agree. In fact, I believe it's the best milk oolong I've tried yet.
I've even brewed it under sloppy/abusive conditions, and always got good
results even though it's very green by my standards.

I also tried Teaspring's Bai Ji Guan, which is also one of the very best
I've tried. Were I not committed to Pu-erh in my oral drip these days,
this could be the every-sunday tipple while listening to Midnight Special.

-DM


So glad you gave that oolong a try!
Now you've got me - I'll have to taste the Bai Ji Guan, although it's
still a little difficult to take me away from Scott's (YS)Yunnan
Gold...................
Shucks! I just sent off an order to Teaspring. Maybe I'll catch it in
time.
To be honest, I've tried this tea from several vendors, over the last
three years, and not found one to knock my socks off, considering it
is touted as "rare".
Can you tell us why you preferred this one?
Shen
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Default Wu Yi Yan Cha Bing - A Lush Oolong! And The Smoothest Nai Xiang (milk) Oolong!


snip snip snip

So glad you gave that oolong a try! Now you've got me - I'll have to
taste the Bai Ji Guan, although it's still a little difficult to take me
away from Scott's (YS)Yunnan Gold................... Shucks! I just sent
off an order to Teaspring. Maybe I'll catch it in time. To be honest,
I've tried this tea from several vendors, over the last three years, and
not found one to knock my socks off, considering it is touted as "rare".
Can you tell us why you preferred this one? Shen



Hi Shen,

A couple years ago, I also tried TeaSpring's Bai Ji Guan, and it was really good. The Tea Gallery in NYC has excellent Bai Ji Guans as well, and of course for me that's easier. One of the tricks is to let them get a good long rest. Of those available today, my favorite is still the 2005. It's softer, richer, and more complex than its newer brothers. Just my humble opinion. Let them sit, and taste the improvement.

Is Scott's Yunnan Gold the blond type or the mixed -- dark and light leaf -- type? Does it lean more toward the honey or the spice?

BTW, admittedly, I've never tasted a BJG from a beeng.

Michael


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Old 19-01-2008, 05:39 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Wu Yi Yan Cha Bing - A Lush Oolong! And The Smoothest Nai Xiang(milk) Oolong!

Heres Scott's

Premium Yunnan Black Gold
http://i3.tinypic.com/82cnqef.jpg
taste (imho): choco+little smoky

Yunnan Pure Small Bud Black Tea Gold Tips
http://img206.imageshack.us/img206/7...dyud1ystp2.jpg
taste (imho): honey+winey
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Old 19-01-2008, 08:33 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Wu Yi Yan Cha Bing - A Lush Oolong! And The Smoothest Nai Xiang(milk) Oolong!

On Jan 19, 6:26*am, Michael Plant wrote:
snip snip snip

So glad you gave that oolong a try! *Now you've got me - I'll have to
taste the Bai Ji Guan, although it's still a little difficult to take me
away from Scott's (YS)Yunnan Gold................... *Shucks! *I just sent
off an order to Teaspring. *Maybe I'll catch it in time. *To be honest,
I've tried this tea from several vendors, over the last three years, and
not found one to knock my socks off, considering it is touted as "rare".
Can you tell us why you preferred this one? *Shen


Hi Shen,

A couple years ago, I also tried TeaSpring's Bai Ji Guan, and it was really good. The Tea Gallery in NYC has excellent Bai Ji Guans as well, and of course for me that's easier. One of the tricks is to let them get a *good long rest. Of those available today, my favorite is still the 2005. It's softer, richer, and more complex than its newer brothers. Just my humble opinion. Let them sit, and taste the improvement.

Is Scott's Yunnan Gold the blond type or the mixed -- dark and light leaf -- type? *Does it lean more toward the honey or the spice?

BTW, admittedly, I've never tasted a BJG from a beeng.

Michael


Hello, Michael,
Nice to see you're posting again!
Actually, I've had both from him.
The more golden, smaller leaf is sweeter, a roundish honey and cocoa
flavor.
The blacker gold is spicy and has warm cinnamon and toasty chocolate
overtones.
I really like them both. They were a good buy.
Nothing, though, has compared to the profoundly rich, Mexican
chocolate and gingery tones of Hou De's Yunnan of 2006.
I found that tea fabulously complicated with layers of sensuous
sweetness developing in every infusion. The 2007 did not compare.
Ah, the whimsy and moodiness of tea, eh?
Shen
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Old 20-01-2008, 10:27 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default ... Oolong!

Shen wrote:
... I'll have to taste the Bai Ji Guan ...
To be honest, I've tried this tea from several vendors, over the last
three years, and not found one to knock my socks off, considering it
is touted as "rare".
Can you tell us why you preferred this one?



More an absence of wrongs than a presence of rights. Everything good is
the fragrant, fruity/rich, fascinating a complex flavor that changes
constantly - or perhaps stays the same, but reveals dimensions as the
senses' attention moves around. What's missing is any hint of staleness,
off-flavors, astringency (even in late steeps), other distractions. A
solid canonical example of the type, IMO. And again, I rarely like
oolongs this green this much.

-DM


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