Sourdough (rec.food.sourdough) Discussing the hobby or craft of baking with sourdough. We are not just a recipe group, Our charter is to discuss the care, feeding, and breeding of yeasts and lactobacilli that make up sourdough cultures.

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Old 10-01-2006, 05:01 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
 
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Default the traditional Italian sourdough starter " madre"

A couple of month ago , I had Panettone from Italy that was so
great~!!!

and I could not forget the taste of it.

so I made my mind to make my own Panettone.

finally I found a recipe that seems good.

but the thing is the recipe requires mother yeast called "madre" which
the recipe does not say.

I started to find the recipe for "madre".but i could not find any
recipes at all.

Does anyone know how to make it?

I heard it takes up to 20 days, and it is based on
fruits.........that's all I know.

If I make Panettone with the traditional Italian sourdough starter "
madre",

I will send him or her (who let me know how to make it) the Panettone
I made.

Fedex does go anywhere in the world.

I promise.


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Old 11-01-2006, 12:15 AM posted to rec.food.sourdough
PDX-Blogger
 
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Default the traditional Italian sourdough starter " madre"

Try this: http://ciaoitalia.com/recipe14June2000.html

€A couple of month ago , I had Panettone from Italy that was so
€great~!!!

€and I could not forget the taste of it.

€so I made my mind to make my own Panettone.

€finally I found a recipe that seems good.

€but the thing is the recipe requires mother yeast called "madre" which
€the recipe does not say.

€I started to find the recipe for "madre".but i could not find any
€recipes at all.

€Does anyone know how to make it?

€I heard it takes up to 20 days, and it is based on
€fruits.........that's all I know.

€If I make Panettone with the traditional Italian sourdough starter "
€madre",

€I will send him or her (who let me know how to make it) the Panettone
€I made.

€Fedex does go anywhere in the world.

€ I promise.

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Old 11-01-2006, 04:31 AM posted to rec.food.sourdough
 
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Default the traditional Italian sourdough starter " madre"

Thank you.........but what I'm looking for does not use
yeast..................This is biga

The madre I need is natural fermented sourdough starter, it dode not
use artificial yeast.

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Old 11-01-2006, 04:56 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Default the traditional Italian sourdough starter " madre"

Thank you TG.
I belive you , though I would ilke to know the recipes of your Italian
starters.
and. I saw a picture from a book( artisan baking across America by
Maggie Glezer)
that shows "madre" which was bundled in cloth and tied in twine.and it
say it's
the Italian traditional way.
Do you know what it is?
That's why I thought the Italian one is different from the others.



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Old 11-01-2006, 11:41 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
wildeny
 
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Default the traditional Italian sourdough starter " madre"

Samartha gave the definition here
http://samartha.net/SD/SourdoughDefinition.html

If you cannot find what you want, maybe you can put your question in
rec.food.sourdough
Samartha is active there.

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Old 12-01-2006, 03:16 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
TG
 
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Default the traditional Italian sourdough starter " madre"

andy..naver.com wrote:

Thank you TG.
I belive you , though I would ilke to know the recipes of your Italian
starters.
and. I saw a picture from a book( artisan baking across America by
Maggie Glezer)
that shows "madre" which was bundled in cloth and tied in twine.and it
say it's
the Italian traditional way.
Do you know what it is?
That's why I thought the Italian one is different from the others.


Oh, that's easy, Take come Italian flour or grain and add water. Lave
for 24 hours or so and refresh. : -)

No, I really think it's just another name, like some use mother
starter in English, I've got a recipe for Panetone from Il Fornaio if
you'd like me to send it.

If you're asking me about Italian traditions I'm not really
qualified. I'm a Heinz 57 but no Italian that I know of.

TG

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Old 12-01-2006, 03:36 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
TG
 
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Default the traditional Italian sourdough starter " madre"

wildeny wrote:

Samartha gave the definition here
http://samartha.net/SD/SourdoughDefinition.html

If you cannot find what you want, maybe you can put your question in
rec.food.sourdough
Samartha is active there.


Am I missing something? This is rec.food.sourdough.

TG


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Old 12-01-2006, 11:28 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
wildeny
 
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Default the traditional Italian sourdough starter " madre"

Yes, you're right. I was sleeping

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Old 02-02-2006, 07:17 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Default the traditional Italian sourdough starter " madre"

got the following from he http://www.sfbi.com/bakers_tips.html -
Maintaining an Italian Starter
by Baking & Pastry Instructor
Jeffrey Yankellow

Often when baking sweet breads, the benefits of the acidity produced by a
sourdough starter are desirable, except for the sour flavor. The acidity
contributes to aromas, extended shelf life and dough strength. Colomba
Pasquale is a good example of this. In order to maintain a starter that fits
in these parameters, you need to follow a feeding schedule that favors mild
acid production and yeast activity.

The sourdough culture is maintained at a warm temperature (80 to 85°F) and
fed every 4 hours. The more frequent feedings prevent the acetic acid from
developing and the warmer temperatures favor lactic acid production. It is
more common to maintain a starter at 100% hydration for mild acidity, but
with the Italian starter, the hydration is 50%. The reason can be attributed
more to tradition than theory. When there was no way to control the
temperature of the room, the starter was fed every four hours and left at
room temperature. Then, during the period that no one was in the bakery, the
starter was wrapped tightly in a cloth and tied with a rope or string in a
way that allowed minimual room for expansion.

Forcing the starter to mature in this enclosed space produced a mild flavor.
For obvious reasons this method cannot be used with a liquid starter. If you
are unable to control the temperature of the starter, this method is
adequate. This style of starter is recommended for any sweet dough, such as
the Colomba, Panettone and croissants.

hope it helps

dan w

wrote in message
ups.com...
Thank you TG.
I belive you , though I would ilke to know the recipes of your Italian
starters.
and. I saw a picture from a book( artisan baking across America by
Maggie Glezer)
that shows "madre" which was bundled in cloth and tied in twine.and it
say it's
the Italian traditional way.
Do you know what it is?
That's why I thought the Italian one is different from the others.





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