Sourdough (rec.food.sourdough) Discussing the hobby or craft of baking with sourdough. We are not just a recipe group, Our charter is to discuss the care, feeding, and breeding of yeasts and lactobacilli that make up sourdough cultures.

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Old 21-08-2005, 01:31 PM
Samartha Deva
 
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Default "real " sourdough zucchini bread?

Too much zucchini!

Apparently making bread from it is a way to process the abundance.
I tried finding recipes, two pasted below, one with sourdough.

Well, looking at this, I'd call it more cake recipes, but anyway.

Joan Ross uses the sourdough as a taste enhancer and drives it with
baking powder/soda.

I wonder...

going the cake route, with eggs, sugar, oil

or (my type) bread style, maybe frying the zucchini to get some more
taste in the style of potato bread

with sourdough fermentation/rising, leaving the baking powder/soda and
brandy out when doing the cake style.

Has anyone tried this or can estimate what the eggs, sugar and oil in
those amounts would do to sourdough fermentation?


Samartha

from Chris Behrens Nov 13 1992, 8:45 am:

ZUCCHINI BREAD
- ---------------------------
3 cups prepared zucchini puree
3.5 cups flour
2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
3 tsp cinnamon
3 tsp nutmeg
2 tsp ginger
3 cups granulated sugar
1 cup salad oil
2/3 cup brandy (or water, but I recommend brandy!)
4 eggs


To prepare the zuchini, cut the zuchini into pieces about
3 inches long and then quater them lengthwise. Cut out seeds and
and cook zuchini meat in 1/4 to 1/8 inch of boiling water, turning
until tender. This could take 15-20 minutes. Drain off water and
puree. Now you may either make the bread or freeze the puree - it will
keep for a LONG time, and can be thawed in the microwave. I usually
use freezer bags and divide up the puree into 3 cup increments. Oh,
and remember to leave the skin ON THE ZUCHINI!!


To make the bread: Mix the puree and other ingredients
together for for minutes with a mixer. Pour the results into 3 loaf
pans and bake for 50-60 minutes at 350 degrees Fareinheit.


Pumpkin Bread
- ---------------------------
One suggestion: roll up the dough to place in the pan;
the circular grain comes out very nicely indeed.


Pumpkin - 2 cups (Libby's canned or similar)
Flour - enough (just keep adding until consistency is right)
Yeast - 2 Tblspns dry in 1/2 cup of 110 degree water
Salt - 1 Tblspn
Oil - 2 Tblspns
Molasses - 1/3 to 1/2 cup
Apple Cider - 2 cups (fresh cider is best, unfiltered apple juice okay)


from Joan Ross Aug 31 1999, 1:00 am

Thought some may like this quickbread recipe for both leftover
culture and summer's end zucchini


Sourdough Zucchini Bread


1/2 cup oil
1 egg
3/4 cup white or brown sugar
1/2 cup sourdough starter
1/2 cup milk
1 cup grated zucchini
2 cups flour
1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp cloves
1/4 tsp raisins - 1/4 cup!
1/4 cup nuts


Mix oil, sugar,egg and starter and milk. Stir until sugar is well
dissolved. Stir in zucchini. Combine dry ingredients and mix into
zucchini mixture just to blend well. Fold in raisins and nuts. Grease
and flour a pan that will hold mixture about 2/3 full. Bake 325 F,
one hour or tested done. Cool in pan 5 minutes before removing. Remove
and cool on rack completely. Wrap and mellow overnight before cutting
for best texture and flavor.




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Old 21-08-2005, 02:48 PM
Dick Adams
 
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Default


"Samartha Deva" wrote in message =
news:[email protected] ww.mountainbitwarrior.c=
om...

Joan Ross uses the sourdough as a taste enhancer and drives it with=20
baking powder/soda.


Oh, lordy! She does that? And she always seemed like such a nice
person ...
=20
[ ... ]


Has anyone tried this or can estimate what the eggs, sugar and oil in=20
those amounts would do to sourdough fermentation?


Why not forget all that, and simply add blenderized de-seeded zucs to
your dough, starting with small quantities to see what you can get away=20
with?

--
Dicky

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Old 21-08-2005, 05:10 PM
Brian Mailman
 
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Default

Samartha Deva wrote:

Joan Ross uses the sourdough as a taste enhancer and drives it with
baking powder/soda.

I wonder...

going the cake route, with eggs, sugar, oil

or (my type) bread style, maybe frying the zucchini to get some more
taste in the style of potato bread


No, I'd salt the shreds before pureeing and squeeze out the liquid,
otherwise your hydration is going to be off. I've tried making
soda-raised brunchbreads into yeasted versions and found problems with
too-moist/wet doughs when baking.

B/
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Old 21-08-2005, 06:12 PM
Samartha Deva
 
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Default

Dick Adams wrote:
[..]

Why not forget all that, and simply add blenderized de-seeded zucs to
your dough, starting with small quantities to see what you can get away
with?


Sure, something like that would be an approach and I was thinking about
it. But then, maybe somebody has done/tried it before which could narrow
down the number of test cases to run - 5 %, 5.5% .. 10 %, 11%, 12%.. 20
%.... ;-)

Now, my thinking is that the zucchini are almost tt - truly tasteless
and have a lot of liquid. With the zucc. cakes the tt is compensated
with all the other more tasteful ingredients and sugar.

Maybe to bring out the zucc. taste more - frying with onions && then 20
%... simmer down a 2 kg zucchini by 50 % would give 5 kg bread... better
be right.

I'll probably have to go white.

I'll think about it..

Samartha
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Old 22-08-2005, 12:10 AM
Kenneth
 
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Default

On Sun, 21 Aug 2005 11:12:18 -0600, Samartha Deva
wrote:

Maybe to bring out the zucc. taste more - frying with onions && then 20
%... simmer down a 2 kg zucchini by 50 % would give 5 kg bread... better
be right.


Hi Samartha,

Try this:

Shred 'em. Salt 'em.

Then squeeze out as much liquid as possible (either by hand,
or with something like a potato ricer.)

Then saute with onion and garlic, S&P etc.

They are wonderful that way.

All the best,
--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."


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Old 22-08-2005, 12:11 AM
Kenneth
 
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Default

On Sun, 21 Aug 2005 19:10:08 -0400, Kenneth
wrote:

On Sun, 21 Aug 2005 11:12:18 -0600, Samartha Deva
wrote:

Maybe to bring out the zucc. taste more - frying with onions && then 20
%... simmer down a 2 kg zucchini by 50 % would give 5 kg bread... better
be right.


Hi Samartha,

Try this:

Shred 'em. Salt 'em.

Then squeeze out as much liquid as possible (either by hand,
or with something like a potato ricer.)

Then saute with onion and garlic, S&P etc.

They are wonderful that way.

All the best,


Ooops,

I posted the above before seeing Brian's nearly identical
suggestion.

'Sorry,
--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
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Old 22-08-2005, 01:35 AM
Ron
 
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Zucchini is 95% water, so the main issue for bread is that you're
adding something close to pure water. By starting with a zucchini
puree, at least you could try to lower the water content somewhat. The
other question is whether the modest zucchini flavor components can
stand up to the flour and yeast. The technique of adding eggs, sugar,
and oil is probably to compensate for the small contribution of the 5%
of the zucchini that is not just plain water.

Ron



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