Preserving (rec.food.preserving) Devoted to the discussion of recipes, equipment, and techniques of food preservation. Techniques that should be discussed in this forum include canning, freezing, dehydration, pickling, smoking, salting, and distilling.

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Old 07-09-2011, 04:34 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Homemade Cayenne Pepper Hot Sauce

Greetings one and all!

I am new to canning and preserving, so please bear with me

I grew a bumper crop of cayenne peppers this year, and I want to make
a thin, "Tabasco"-style hot sauce. I want to bottle this sauce and
process it so that it is shelf-stable. If I make enough, I would like
to give it as gifts to friends and family. The only problem is that I
cannot seem to find good instructions on how to accomplish this! Any
suggestions y'all may have will be GREATLY appreciated. Thanks in
advance!

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Old 07-09-2011, 05:54 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Homemade Cayenne Pepper Hot Sauce

On 9/7/2011 10:34 AM, Nicholas Fryer wrote:
Greetings one and all!

I am new to canning and preserving, so please bear with me

I grew a bumper crop of cayenne peppers this year, and I want to make
a thin, "Tabasco"-style hot sauce. I want to bottle this sauce and
process it so that it is shelf-stable. If I make enough, I would like
to give it as gifts to friends and family. The only problem is that I
cannot seem to find good instructions on how to accomplish this! Any
suggestions y'all may have will be GREATLY appreciated. Thanks in
advance!

Hot sauce is normally made with fermented chiles. I used to make quite a
lot until they ate out the lining of my stomach.

Basically you need to wash, cap (take off stem), dry, and then fine chop
the chiles. Put them in a large jar or crock, cover top of chiles with
about a half-inch layer of pickling or kosher salt. Leave in a dry, cool
place, like a cellar and keep an eye on the stuff. If it grows mold you
need to scrap it off. It will mellow out and get good over time.

Alternatively you can just make the stuff the way you want, run it
through a blender or a food processor until slurried, add about 30% by
volume of 5% USP white vinegar, mix well and blend.

Tabasco is fermented in a played out salt mine on Avery Island in
Louisiana. It is in used wooden barrels, salted down and the lids
replaced and held for a year before processing. The salt mine provides a
constant humidity and temperature which is used for making fermented
sauces. YMMV.

Do a Google on this newsgroup and you should find several references to
"Hot Sauce" from the last nineteen years.

George
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Old 07-09-2011, 06:00 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Homemade Cayenne Pepper Hot Sauce

On Sep 7, 11:54*am, George Shirley wrote:
On 9/7/2011 10:34 AM, Nicholas Fryer wrote: Greetings one and all!

I am new to canning and preserving, so please bear with me


I grew a bumper crop of cayenne peppers this year, and I want to make
a thin, "Tabasco"-style hot sauce. I want to bottle this sauce and
process it so that it is shelf-stable. If I make enough, I would like
to give it as gifts to friends and family. The only problem is that I
cannot seem to find good instructions on how to accomplish this! Any
suggestions y'all may have will be GREATLY appreciated. Thanks in
advance!


Hot sauce is normally made with fermented chiles. I used to make quite a
lot until they ate out the lining of my stomach.

Basically you need to wash, cap (take off stem), dry, and then fine chop
the chiles. Put them in a large jar or crock, cover top of chiles with
about a half-inch layer of pickling or kosher salt. Leave in a dry, cool
place, like a cellar and keep an eye on the stuff. If it grows mold you
need to scrap it off. It will mellow out and get good over time.

Alternatively you can just make the stuff the way you want, run it
through a blender or a food processor until slurried, add about 30% by
volume of 5% USP white vinegar, mix well and blend.

Tabasco is fermented in a played out salt mine on Avery Island in
Louisiana. It is in used wooden barrels, salted down and the lids
replaced and held for a year before processing. The salt mine provides a
constant humidity and temperature which is used for making fermented
sauces. YMMV.

Do a Google on this newsgroup and you should find several references to
"Hot Sauce" from the last nineteen years.

George


George, thank you for the reply! I searched and did indeed find many
informative posts you have written over the years! One final question:
if I do not ferment the chilies, and I want to bottle the sauce in the
small "woozy" style bottles, is it necessary to process the bottled
sauced in a water bath? If so, how long would you recommend? Thanks
again for sharing your knowledge!
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Old 07-09-2011, 07:29 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Homemade Cayenne Pepper Hot Sauce

On 9/7/2011 12:00 PM, Nicholas Fryer wrote:
On Sep 7, 11:54 am, George wrote:
On 9/7/2011 10:34 AM, Nicholas Fryer wrote: Greetings one and all!

I am new to canning and preserving, so please bear with me


I grew a bumper crop of cayenne peppers this year, and I want to make
a thin, "Tabasco"-style hot sauce. I want to bottle this sauce and
process it so that it is shelf-stable. If I make enough, I would like
to give it as gifts to friends and family. The only problem is that I
cannot seem to find good instructions on how to accomplish this! Any
suggestions y'all may have will be GREATLY appreciated. Thanks in
advance!


Hot sauce is normally made with fermented chiles. I used to make quite a
lot until they ate out the lining of my stomach.

Basically you need to wash, cap (take off stem), dry, and then fine chop
the chiles. Put them in a large jar or crock, cover top of chiles with
about a half-inch layer of pickling or kosher salt. Leave in a dry, cool
place, like a cellar and keep an eye on the stuff. If it grows mold you
need to scrap it off. It will mellow out and get good over time.

Alternatively you can just make the stuff the way you want, run it
through a blender or a food processor until slurried, add about 30% by
volume of 5% USP white vinegar, mix well and blend.

Tabasco is fermented in a played out salt mine on Avery Island in
Louisiana. It is in used wooden barrels, salted down and the lids
replaced and held for a year before processing. The salt mine provides a
constant humidity and temperature which is used for making fermented
sauces. YMMV.

Do a Google on this newsgroup and you should find several references to
"Hot Sauce" from the last nineteen years.

George


George, thank you for the reply! I searched and did indeed find many
informative posts you have written over the years! One final question:
if I do not ferment the chilies, and I want to bottle the sauce in the
small "woozy" style bottles, is it necessary to process the bottled
sauced in a water bath? If so, how long would you recommend? Thanks
again for sharing your knowledge!

I never did, with 30% vinegar in the solution I never had a problem with
bottled hot sauce going bad. Not sure how the professionals do it,
didn't ask last time I visited the Tabasco place. You probably will have
to shake the bottle a bit each time you pour some sauce, it tends to
separate a bit whilst sitting on the shelf.
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Old 07-09-2011, 07:37 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Homemade Cayenne Pepper Hot Sauce

On Sep 7, 1:29*pm, George Shirley wrote:
On 9/7/2011 12:00 PM, Nicholas Fryer wrote:



On Sep 7, 11:54 am, George *wrote:
On 9/7/2011 10:34 AM, Nicholas Fryer wrote: *Greetings one and all!


I am new to canning and preserving, so please bear with me


I grew a bumper crop of cayenne peppers this year, and I want to make
a thin, "Tabasco"-style hot sauce. I want to bottle this sauce and
process it so that it is shelf-stable. If I make enough, I would like
to give it as gifts to friends and family. The only problem is that I
cannot seem to find good instructions on how to accomplish this! Any
suggestions y'all may have will be GREATLY appreciated. Thanks in
advance!


Hot sauce is normally made with fermented chiles. I used to make quite a
lot until they ate out the lining of my stomach.


Basically you need to wash, cap (take off stem), dry, and then fine chop
the chiles. Put them in a large jar or crock, cover top of chiles with
about a half-inch layer of pickling or kosher salt. Leave in a dry, cool
place, like a cellar and keep an eye on the stuff. If it grows mold you
need to scrap it off. It will mellow out and get good over time.


Alternatively you can just make the stuff the way you want, run it
through a blender or a food processor until slurried, add about 30% by
volume of 5% USP white vinegar, mix well and blend.


Tabasco is fermented in a played out salt mine on Avery Island in
Louisiana. It is in used wooden barrels, salted down and the lids
replaced and held for a year before processing. The salt mine provides a
constant humidity and temperature which is used for making fermented
sauces. YMMV.


Do a Google on this newsgroup and you should find several references to
"Hot Sauce" from the last nineteen years.


George


George, thank you for the reply! I searched and did indeed find many
informative posts you have written over the years! One final question:
if I do not ferment the chilies, and I want to bottle the sauce in the
small "woozy" style bottles, is it necessary to process the bottled
sauced in a water bath? If so, how long would you recommend? Thanks
again for sharing your knowledge!


I never did, with 30% vinegar in the solution I never had a problem with
bottled hot sauce going bad. Not sure how the professionals do it,
didn't ask last time I visited the Tabasco place. You probably will have
to shake the bottle a bit each time you pour some sauce, it tends to
separate a bit whilst sitting on the shelf.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Thanks again!


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Old 16-09-2011, 05:58 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Homemade Cayenne Pepper Hot Sauce


"Nicholas Fryer" wrote in message
...
On Sep 7, 1:29 pm, George Shirley wrote:
On 9/7/2011 12:00 PM, Nicholas Fryer wrote:



I never did, with 30% vinegar in the solution I never had a problem with
bottled hot sauce going bad. Not sure how the professionals do it,
didn't ask last time I visited the Tabasco place. You probably will have
to shake the bottle a bit each time you pour some sauce, it tends to
separate a bit whilst sitting on the shelf.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Thanks again!

I just got done putting up 30 bottles of a Pineapple mango hot sauce. I
prefer red peppers to be fermented and try to go easy on the vinegar. I
probably used 20% vinegar. Lime Juice has a lower ph and is a good
addition to use. I have a PH meter and normally my sauce is around 3.6 ph .
there is no need to have a bwb. I wash the bottles when I am cooking the
sauce and ladle boiling sauce into the hot bottles cap the bottles and turn
them upside down to sterilize the paper inside the lid.
I am on facebook under Mikes Hot sauce if you have more questions or
e-mail


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Old 19-09-2011, 05:02 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Homemade Cayenne Pepper Hot Sauce

In article ,
George Shirley wrote:

On 9/7/2011 10:34 AM, Nicholas Fryer wrote:
Greetings one and all!

I am new to canning and preserving, so please bear with me

I grew a bumper crop of cayenne peppers this year, and I want to make
a thin, "Tabasco"-style hot sauce. I want to bottle this sauce and
process it so that it is shelf-stable. If I make enough, I would like
to give it as gifts to friends and family. The only problem is that I
cannot seem to find good instructions on how to accomplish this! Any
suggestions y'all may have will be GREATLY appreciated. Thanks in
advance!

Hot sauce is normally made with fermented chiles. I used to make quite a
lot until they ate out the lining of my stomach.

Basically you need to wash, cap (take off stem), dry, and then fine chop
the chiles. Put them in a large jar or crock, cover top of chiles with
about a half-inch layer of pickling or kosher salt. Leave in a dry, cool
place, like a cellar and keep an eye on the stuff. If it grows mold you
need to scrap it off. It will mellow out and get good over time.

Alternatively you can just make the stuff the way you want, run it
through a blender or a food processor until slurried, add about 30% by
volume of 5% USP white vinegar, mix well and blend.

Tabasco is fermented in a played out salt mine on Avery Island in
Louisiana. It is in used wooden barrels, salted down and the lids
replaced and held for a year before processing. The salt mine provides a
constant humidity and temperature which is used for making fermented
sauces. YMMV.

Do a Google on this newsgroup and you should find several references to
"Hot Sauce" from the last nineteen years.

George


D'ya think that's the most asked question here, Jorge? I still have
your stuff in my fridge. It keeps well. :-)

--
Barb,
http://web.me.com/barbschaller September 5, 2011
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Old 19-09-2011, 05:04 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Homemade Cayenne Pepper Hot Sauce

In article
,
Nicholas Fryer wrote:

George, thank you for the reply! I searched and did indeed find many
informative posts you have written over the years! One final question:
if I do not ferment the chilies, and I want to bottle the sauce in the
small "woozy" style bottles, is it necessary to process the bottled
sauced in a water bath? If so, how long would you recommend? Thanks
again for sharing your knowledge!


You can't expect a seal if your cap doesn't have a sealing compound and
I don't think I've ever seen a little cap like that with a plastisol
liner. All that vinegar will keep it just fine in the fridge.
--
Barb,
http://web.me.com/barbschaller September 5, 2011
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Old 19-09-2011, 12:25 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Homemade Cayenne Pepper Hot Sauce

On 9/18/2011 11:02 PM, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
In ews.com,
George wrote:

On 9/7/2011 10:34 AM, Nicholas Fryer wrote:
Greetings one and all!

I am new to canning and preserving, so please bear with me

I grew a bumper crop of cayenne peppers this year, and I want to make
a thin, "Tabasco"-style hot sauce. I want to bottle this sauce and
process it so that it is shelf-stable. If I make enough, I would like
to give it as gifts to friends and family. The only problem is that I
cannot seem to find good instructions on how to accomplish this! Any
suggestions y'all may have will be GREATLY appreciated. Thanks in
advance!

Hot sauce is normally made with fermented chiles. I used to make quite a
lot until they ate out the lining of my stomach.

Basically you need to wash, cap (take off stem), dry, and then fine chop
the chiles. Put them in a large jar or crock, cover top of chiles with
about a half-inch layer of pickling or kosher salt. Leave in a dry, cool
place, like a cellar and keep an eye on the stuff. If it grows mold you
need to scrap it off. It will mellow out and get good over time.

Alternatively you can just make the stuff the way you want, run it
through a blender or a food processor until slurried, add about 30% by
volume of 5% USP white vinegar, mix well and blend.

Tabasco is fermented in a played out salt mine on Avery Island in
Louisiana. It is in used wooden barrels, salted down and the lids
replaced and held for a year before processing. The salt mine provides a
constant humidity and temperature which is used for making fermented
sauces. YMMV.

Do a Google on this newsgroup and you should find several references to
"Hot Sauce" from the last nineteen years.

George


D'ya think that's the most asked question here, Jorge? I still have
your stuff in my fridge. It keeps well. :-)

As well it should, got enough vinegar in it to clean all the calcium out
of yer teeth. I don't know about the most asked question though. You're
not supposed to keep the stuff, you're supposed to season yer food with it.

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Old 19-09-2011, 02:32 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Default Homemade Cayenne Pepper Hot Sauce

On 9/18/2011 11:04 PM, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
In article
,
Nicholas wrote:

George, thank you for the reply! I searched and did indeed find many
informative posts you have written over the years! One final question:
if I do not ferment the chilies, and I want to bottle the sauce in the
small "woozy" style bottles, is it necessary to process the bottled
sauced in a water bath? If so, how long would you recommend? Thanks
again for sharing your knowledge!


You can't expect a seal if your cap doesn't have a sealing compound and
I don't think I've ever seen a little cap like that with a plastisol
liner. All that vinegar will keep it just fine in the fridge.

I've never sealed any bottles of hot sauce, as Barb says, there's enough
vinegar in there to keep the nasties from growing. Have had it stay
shelf stable for up to two years before I used it all up.

Don't really know if the commercial makers water bath or whatever with
their sauces either.


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