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Old 08-06-2005, 12:58 PM
Aaron S.
 
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Default Ground Red Pepper vs Cayenne Pepper

What's the difference between ground red pepper and cayenne pepper?


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Old 08-06-2005, 02:03 PM
Peter Aitken
 
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"Aaron S." wrote in message
...
What's the difference between ground red pepper and cayenne pepper?


From the practical perspective, usually none. Technically cayenne will be
from cayenne peppers while ground red pepper could be from other types of
hot red pepper.


--
Peter Aitken
Visit my recipe and kitchen myths page at www.pgacon.com/cooking.htm


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Old 08-06-2005, 04:03 PM
Doug Kanter
 
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"Aaron S." wrote in message
...
What's the difference between ground red pepper and cayenne pepper?


1) Contents: Theoretically, nothing. I just bought a container of McCormick
ground red pepper, and in parentheses, it said "cayenne", which is just what
I wanted. Check the label.

2) Consistency: Red pepper flakes aren't appropriate in some recipes.
Sometimes you need a powder. The flakes usually have seeds mixed in, and
their hotness is not as consistent as the skin's.


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Old 08-06-2005, 07:31 PM
Dan Abel
 
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In article , Aaron S.
wrote:

What's the difference between ground red pepper and cayenne pepper?


Let's make that ground red pepper and ground cayenne pepper, OK?

It's like the difference between fruit and apples. Apples are a kind of
fruit, but if you have a piece of fruit, it isn't necessarily an apple, it
might be an orange, banana or even durian.

Ground cayenne pepper is a kind of ground red pepper, but if you have some
ground red pepper, it could be any kind of ground dried red pepper,
including some that are quite mild.

--
Dan Abel
Sonoma State University
AIS

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Old 08-06-2005, 08:24 PM
notbob
 
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On 2005-06-08, Dan Abel wrote:

Ground cayenne pepper is a kind of ground red pepper, but if you have some
ground red pepper, it could be any kind of ground dried red pepper,
including some that are quite mild.


Or, the spice company may just be a buncha twits. I recall seeing
one spice brand labeled 'ground red pepper' and upon further reading
of the label/ingredients discovered it was, in fact, cayenne.

nb


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Old 08-06-2005, 08:38 PM
Doug Kanter
 
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"notbob" wrote in message
...
On 2005-06-08, Dan Abel wrote:

Ground cayenne pepper is a kind of ground red pepper, but if you have
some
ground red pepper, it could be any kind of ground dried red pepper,
including some that are quite mild.


Or, the spice company may just be a buncha twits. I recall seeing
one spice brand labeled 'ground red pepper' and upon further reading
of the label/ingredients discovered it was, in fact, cayenne.

nb


Well, a cayenne is a pepper and it is red when mature.


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Old 08-06-2005, 10:14 PM
zxcvbob
 
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Doug Kanter wrote:
"notbob" wrote in message
...

On 2005-06-08, Dan Abel wrote:


Ground cayenne pepper is a kind of ground red pepper, but if you have
some
ground red pepper, it could be any kind of ground dried red pepper,
including some that are quite mild.


Or, the spice company may just be a buncha twits. I recall seeing
one spice brand labeled 'ground red pepper' and upon further reading
of the label/ingredients discovered it was, in fact, cayenne.

nb



Well, a cayenne is a pepper and it is red when mature.




By calling it "Ground red pepper", they can substitute a different hot
pepper (like maybe japones or sanaam) if the the price is better or
there's a crop failure for cayenne peppers. Usually ground red pepper
will be cayenne, and I would say the two products are always interchangable.

Best regards,
Bob
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Old 08-06-2005, 10:25 PM
Aaron S.
 
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On Wed, 08 Jun 2005 15:03:38 GMT, "Doug Kanter"
wrote:

2) Consistency: Red pepper flakes aren't appropriate in some recipes.
Sometimes you need a powder. The flakes usually have seeds mixed in, and
their hotness is not as consistent as the skin's.


I have 2 bottles of ground red pepper from Walmart. One old, one new.
It only cost 48 cents per bottle. The brands are Spice Classics and
5th Season, but they're actually just different names for the same
brand. What I don't like about it is that it sometimes seems to taste
more like salt than pepper. Is that just me, or does it actually have
salt in it? Or does red pepper do something to your taste buds to
make everything taste like salt a few minutes later?

The real question is this: If I buy a more expensive brand of ground
red pepper, will it definitely not have that salty taste? Or is there
any other reason why a more expensive brand might be worth the extra
money?

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Old 08-06-2005, 10:50 PM
The Real Bev
 
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zxcvbob wrote:

Doug Kanter wrote:
"notbob" wrote:

On 2005-06-08, Dan Abel wrote:

Ground cayenne pepper is a kind of ground red pepper, but if you have
some
ground red pepper, it could be any kind of ground dried red pepper,
including some that are quite mild.

Or, the spice company may just be a buncha twits. I recall seeing
one spice brand labeled 'ground red pepper' and upon further reading
of the label/ingredients discovered it was, in fact, cayenne.


Well, a cayenne is a pepper and it is red when mature.


By calling it "Ground red pepper", they can substitute a different hot
pepper (like maybe japones or sanaam) if the the price is better or
there's a crop failure for cayenne peppers. Usually ground red pepper
will be cayenne, and I would say the two products are always interchangable.


And the best place to buy this stuff is a store catering to Mexicans. There
will be several different kinds hanging on the wall, generally under
$1/ounce. Check out the other spices too.

--
Cheers,
Bev
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
The Marketing Professional's Motto: "We don't screw the customers. All
we're doing is holding them down while the salespeople screw them."
-- Scott Adams
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Old 09-06-2005, 02:51 AM
Mark Thorson
 
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"Aaron S." wrote:

What's the difference between ground red pepper and cayenne pepper?


About a dollar and a half. :-)





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Old 09-06-2005, 03:35 AM
Doug Kanter
 
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"Aaron S." wrote in message
...
On Wed, 08 Jun 2005 15:03:38 GMT, "Doug Kanter"
wrote:

2) Consistency: Red pepper flakes aren't appropriate in some recipes.
Sometimes you need a powder. The flakes usually have seeds mixed in, and
their hotness is not as consistent as the skin's.


I have 2 bottles of ground red pepper from Walmart. One old, one new.
It only cost 48 cents per bottle. The brands are Spice Classics and
5th Season, but they're actually just different names for the same
brand. What I don't like about it is that it sometimes seems to taste
more like salt than pepper. Is that just me, or does it actually have
salt in it? Or does red pepper do something to your taste buds to
make everything taste like salt a few minutes later?

The real question is this: If I buy a more expensive brand of ground
red pepper, will it definitely not have that salty taste? Or is there
any other reason why a more expensive brand might be worth the extra
money?


The only way to answer your question would be to buy the more expensive one,
right? And, what does the label say on the ones you have? Does it mention
salt?




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