Historic (rec.food.historic) Discussing and discovering how food was made and prepared way back when--From ancient times down until (& possibly including or even going slightly beyond) the times when industrial revolution began to change our lives.

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Old 06-07-2011, 04:49 AM posted to rec.food.historic
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Default stick macaroni, ca 1903

Well, because it is dead here, and because I do like to post these
things for future reference, here is a little factoid from an old
(1903) cookbook I was perusing:

12 sticks of macaroni = 1/4 lb

Now, wouldn't folks here like to start posting, or I might be
forced to type up a recipe or something. :-) Shoulda kept items
with no hits on goo*le out for this purpose.
--
Jean B.

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Old 06-07-2011, 05:20 PM posted to rec.food.historic
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Sqwertz wrote:
On Tue, 05 Jul 2011 23:49:23 -0400, Jean B. wrote:

Well, because it is dead here, and because I do like to post these
things for future reference, here is a little factoid from an old
(1903) cookbook I was perusing:

12 sticks of macaroni = 1/4 lb

Now, wouldn't folks here like to start posting, or I might be
forced to type up a recipe or something. :-) Shoulda kept items
with no hits on goo*le out for this purpose.


So what gives macaroni it's curl in the first place? Is there some
sort of "drag" formed into the sides of one of the brass extruders?
Why is Chefboyardee Beefaroni(tm) the only hollow tubular straight
macaroni available? I've never seen it dried, or in sticks.

Bucatini are too thick in the pasta and not enough airspace, IMO. Why
can't we (I?) get straight macaroni which is "hollower" than bucatini?

-sw


Ah, I am not an expert on pasta. But maybe someone here is.

--
Jean B.
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Old 06-07-2011, 05:21 PM posted to rec.food.historic
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Default stick macaroni, ca 1903

Sqwertz wrote:
On Tue, 05 Jul 2011 23:49:23 -0400, Jean B. wrote:

Well, because it is dead here, and because I do like to post these
things for future reference, here is a little factoid from an old
(1903) cookbook I was perusing:

12 sticks of macaroni = 1/4 lb

Now, wouldn't folks here like to start posting, or I might be
forced to type up a recipe or something. :-) Shoulda kept items
with no hits on goo*le out for this purpose.


So what gives macaroni it's curl in the first place? Is there some
sort of "drag" formed into the sides of one of the brass extruders?
Why is Chefboyardee Beefaroni(tm) the only hollow tubular straight
macaroni available? I've never seen it dried, or in sticks.

Bucatini are too thick in the pasta and not enough airspace, IMO. Why
can't we (I?) get straight macaroni which is "hollower" than bucatini?

-sw


PS Come to think of it, I would like to see period drawings or
photos of what was offering here in days of yore. Usually I do
read of breaking up the macaroni, so that must have been the norm.

--
Jean B.
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Old 06-07-2011, 05:45 PM posted to rec.food.historic
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Default stick macaroni, ca 1903

On Wed, 6 Jul 2011 01:07:02 -0500, Sqwertz
wrote:

On Tue, 05 Jul 2011 23:49:23 -0400, Jean B. wrote:

Well, because it is dead here, and because I do like to post these
things for future reference, here is a little factoid from an old
(1903) cookbook I was perusing:

12 sticks of macaroni = 1/4 lb

Now, wouldn't folks here like to start posting, or I might be
forced to type up a recipe or something. :-) Shoulda kept items
with no hits on goo*le out for this purpose.


So what gives macaroni it's curl in the first place? Is there some
sort of "drag" formed into the sides of one of the brass extruders?
Why is Chefboyardee Beefaroni(tm) the only hollow tubular straight
macaroni available? I've never seen it dried, or in sticks.

Bucatini are too thick in the pasta and not enough airspace, IMO. Why
can't we (I?) get straight macaroni which is "hollower" than bucatini?



Try Maestri Pastai (also sold as Gragnano), they offer a long ziti,
mezzanini, mezze candele, penne candela, and candele lunghe. I am sure
there are other Italian pasta manufacturers that offer these long,
hollow pastas, but this was the first I was able to find.
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Old 07-07-2011, 07:11 PM posted to rec.food.historic
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Default stick macaroni, ca 1903

Sqwertz (great username, BTW),

I'm not sure I understand your question... there are many hollow
straight pastas (ziti, rigatoni, and penne, are a few examples). As
for "sticks" -- while most commercial ziti is "cut ziti," the original
form is in sticks, about a foot long. I can usually get it in my local
supermarket, and it's certainly available in Italian specialty shops.

There's a classic timbale, made with uncut ziti coiled around the
outside like a beehive. If most of my cookbooks weren't packed away in
boxes in a very hot attic, I'd dig it out for you!

Gary

PS: The Encyclopedia of Pasta, by Oretta Zanini De Vita, will expose
you to more kinds of pasta than you can possibly imagine...


Date: Tues, Jul 5 2011 11:07 pm
From: Sqwertz



On Tue, 05 Jul 2011 23:49:23 -0400, Jean B. wrote:
Why is Chefboyardee Beefaroni(tm) the only hollow tubular straight
macaroni available? I've never seen it dried, or in sticks.


Bucatini are too thick in the pasta and not enough airspace, IMO. Why
can't we (I?) get straight macaroni which is "hollower" than bucatini?


-sw




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