Historic (rec.food.historic) Discussing and discovering how food was made and prepared way back when--From ancient times down until (& possibly including or even going slightly beyond) the times when industrial revolution began to change our lives.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 09-09-2004, 11:44 PM
Sam
 
Posts: n/a
Default need for the invention of spaghetti

i am trying to find a answer to whether spaghetti bolognese is
traditionally done with long thin pasta like spaghetti or taghliatelle
or with shorter rotelle or if it makes any difference at all to the
original italians who made the meal.

why was spaghetti invented if it is so inferior to rotelle's salsa
holding ability?

was it designed to taste different or have a different ratio of salsa
to pasta in one fork. or was it made cause its fun to twirl and slurp
up? any idea on the history of these pasta? thanks

Sam

  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-09-2004, 01:06 AM
Bob (this one)
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Sam wrote:

i am trying to find a answer to whether spaghetti bolognese is
traditionally done with long thin pasta like spaghetti or taghliatelle
or with shorter rotelle or if it makes any difference at all to the
original italians who made the meal.


It's called "spaghetti Bolognese." See, spaghetti...

why was spaghetti invented if it is so inferior to rotelle's salsa
holding ability?


Different pastas hold different sauces better than others. Read about
it. This is a big subject.

was it designed to taste different or have a different ratio of salsa
to pasta in one fork. or was it made cause its fun to twirl and slurp
up? any idea on the history of these pasta? thanks


Google is your friend.

Why didn't you just continue the conversation you were having in
rec.food.cooking about this?

Pastorio

  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-09-2004, 02:18 PM
Combat Lit
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Bob wrote

It's called "spaghetti Bolognese." See, spaghetti...

In Bologna and throughout Northern Italy, the dish is "Tagliatelle al Ragu alla
Bolognese." Spaghetti is not an acceptable substitution in the classic
presentation.

Robert





  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-09-2004, 05:05 PM
Bob (this one)
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Combat Lit wrote:

Bob wrote

It's called "spaghetti Bolognese." See, spaghetti...

In Bologna and throughout Northern Italy, the dish is "Tagliatelle al Ragu alla
Bolognese." Spaghetti is not an acceptable substitution in the classic
presentation.


Of course. I was quoting the guy who asked the question. He asked
about whether "spaghetti Bolognese" used other pastas. I pointed out
that when something was called "spaghetti... anything" it was made
with spaghetti, not elbows or some other shape. It wasn't so much
about Bolognese as the use of "spaghetti" as a generic term for all
pastas.

I had a wide and thick "pasta alla chitarra" with a Bolognese sauce in
Italy some years back. I confess that I preferred it because there was
a heftier bite of pasta than the tagliatelle provide. It worked well
with the intensity of the sauce.

Pastorio



Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Invention of the Juicy Lucy Tom Del Rosso[_3_] General Cooking 17 03-11-2013 12:27 AM
Necessity is the mother of invention Ozgirl Diabetic 5 30-12-2009 04:14 PM
Dinner was a new invention jake General Cooking 13 28-11-2005 04:55 PM
Dinner was a new invention jake Preserving 0 27-11-2005 05:27 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 06:45 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017