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Old 21-10-2005, 04:04 AM
Terry Pulliam Burd
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cobbler Query

My mother made a really great fruit cobbler and I have her recipe
around here somewhere fists on hips, scanning recipe software, old
3x5 cards, old journal-type recipe book and I cannot find the d*mned
thing. I've made cobblers for years and have never really been happy
with the topping. Too dense, but I can't find a recipe that produces
the light, fluffy topping my mother made. Anyone have a good topping
recipe that is, uh, light and fluffy? (Okay, Tee, define "light and
fluffy": you can easily poke a spoon through it and it's not an inch
thick.)

TIA,
Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA

"If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

-- Duncan Hines

To reply, replace "spaminator" with "cox"

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Old 21-10-2005, 04:47 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cobbler Query

On Thu 20 Oct 2005 08:04:37p, Terry Pulliam Burd wrote in rec.food.cooking:

My mother made a really great fruit cobbler and I have her recipe
around here somewhere fists on hips, scanning recipe software, old
3x5 cards, old journal-type recipe book and I cannot find the d*mned
thing. I've made cobblers for years and have never really been happy
with the topping. Too dense, but I can't find a recipe that produces
the light, fluffy topping my mother made. Anyone have a good topping
recipe that is, uh, light and fluffy? (Okay, Tee, define "light and
fluffy": you can easily poke a spoon through it and it's not an inch
thick.)


Terry, I often use a "cream biscuit" dough for topping a cobbler. If
you've not made them, cream biscuits are unusually light and delicate. For
cobbler, I would increase the sugar to 3-4 tablespoons.

Obviously, the thickness of the topping is largely dependent on how thick
you put the dough on before baking. If you want it thinner, I'd not exceed
~1/4 inch.

2 cups self-rising flour, plus more for dusting
1 tablespoon sugar
1 1/2 cups heavy whipping cream

Preheat oven to 500 degrees F.
In a medium bowl, stir together the flour, sugar, and cream until the dough
forms a ball. Turn the dough out onto a surface dusted with additional
flour. Fold the dough in 1/2 and knead 5 to 7 times, adding just enough
flour to keep dough from sticking to your hands. Gently roll out dough to
1/2-inch thickness. Using a 3-inch biscuit cutter coated with flour, cut
dough into biscuits. Place on baking sheet coated with cooking spray,
leaving at least 1-inch between each biscuit. Bake for 10 minutes, or until
golden brown.

HTH

--
Wayne Boatwright **
_____________________________

http://tinypic.com/eikz78.jpg

Meet Mr. Bailey
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Old 21-10-2005, 02:27 PM
biig
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cobbler Query



Wayne Boatwright wrote:

On Thu 20 Oct 2005 08:04:37p, Terry Pulliam Burd wrote in rec.food.cooking:

My mother made a really great fruit cobbler and I have her recipe
around here somewhere fists on hips, scanning recipe software, old
3x5 cards, old journal-type recipe book and I cannot find the d*mned
thing. I've made cobblers for years and have never really been happy
with the topping. Too dense, but I can't find a recipe that produces
the light, fluffy topping my mother made. Anyone have a good topping
recipe that is, uh, light and fluffy? (Okay, Tee, define "light and
fluffy": you can easily poke a spoon through it and it's not an inch
thick.)


Terry, I often use a "cream biscuit" dough for topping a cobbler. If
you've not made them, cream biscuits are unusually light and delicate. For
cobbler, I would increase the sugar to 3-4 tablespoons.

Obviously, the thickness of the topping is largely dependent on how thick
you put the dough on before baking. If you want it thinner, I'd not exceed
~1/4 inch.

2 cups self-rising flour, plus more for dusting
1 tablespoon sugar
1 1/2 cups heavy whipping cream

Preheat oven to 500 degrees F.
In a medium bowl, stir together the flour, sugar, and cream until the dough
forms a ball. Turn the dough out onto a surface dusted with additional
flour. Fold the dough in 1/2 and knead 5 to 7 times, adding just enough
flour to keep dough from sticking to your hands. Gently roll out dough to
1/2-inch thickness. Using a 3-inch biscuit cutter coated with flour, cut
dough into biscuits. Place on baking sheet coated with cooking spray,
leaving at least 1-inch between each biscuit. Bake for 10 minutes, or until
golden brown.

HTH

--
Wayne Boatwright **


Wayne, is self rising flour like a premade biscuit mix?
Thanks....Sharon
  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-10-2005, 02:59 PM
Wayne Boatwright
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cobbler Query

On Fri 21 Oct 2005 06:27:45a, biig wrote in rec.food.cooking:



Wayne Boatwright wrote:

On Thu 20 Oct 2005 08:04:37p, Terry Pulliam Burd wrote in
rec.food.cooking:

My mother made a really great fruit cobbler and I have her recipe
around here somewhere fists on hips, scanning recipe software, old
3x5 cards, old journal-type recipe book and I cannot find the d*mned
thing. I've made cobblers for years and have never really been happy
with the topping. Too dense, but I can't find a recipe that produces
the light, fluffy topping my mother made. Anyone have a good topping
recipe that is, uh, light and fluffy? (Okay, Tee, define "light and
fluffy": you can easily poke a spoon through it and it's not an inch
thick.)


Terry, I often use a "cream biscuit" dough for topping a cobbler. If
you've not made them, cream biscuits are unusually light and delicate.
For cobbler, I would increase the sugar to 3-4 tablespoons.

Obviously, the thickness of the topping is largely dependent on how
thick you put the dough on before baking. If you want it thinner, I'd
not exceed ~1/4 inch.

2 cups self-rising flour, plus more for dusting
1 tablespoon sugar
1 1/2 cups heavy whipping cream

Preheat oven to 500 degrees F.
In a medium bowl, stir together the flour, sugar, and cream until the
dough forms a ball. Turn the dough out onto a surface dusted with
additional flour. Fold the dough in 1/2 and knead 5 to 7 times, adding
just enough flour to keep dough from sticking to your hands. Gently
roll out dough to 1/2-inch thickness. Using a 3-inch biscuit cutter
coated with flour, cut dough into biscuits. Place on baking sheet
coated with cooking spray, leaving at least 1-inch between each
biscuit. Bake for 10 minutes, or until golden brown.

HTH

--
Wayne Boatwright **


Wayne, is self rising flour like a premade biscuit mix?
Thanks....Sharon


No, the biscuit mix also contains shortening or oil in addition to the
flour and leavening. Self-rising flour contains only flour, leavening, and
salt.

You can make your own... To make 1 cup of self-rising flour, take 1 cup
all-purpose flour and add 1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder and 1/2 teaspoon
salt.

--
Wayne Boatwright **
_____________________________

http://tinypic.com/eikz78.jpg

Meet Mr. Bailey
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Old 21-10-2005, 03:18 PM
biig
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cobbler Query



Wayne Boatwright wrote:

On Fri 21 Oct 2005 06:27:45a, biig wrote in rec.food.cooking:



Wayne Boatwright wrote:

On Thu 20 Oct 2005 08:04:37p, Terry Pulliam Burd wrote in
rec.food.cooking:

My mother made a really great fruit cobbler and I have her recipe
around here somewhere fists on hips, scanning recipe software, old
3x5 cards, old journal-type recipe book and I cannot find the d*mned
thing. I've made cobblers for years and have never really been happy
with the topping. Too dense, but I can't find a recipe that produces
the light, fluffy topping my mother made. Anyone have a good topping
recipe that is, uh, light and fluffy? (Okay, Tee, define "light and
fluffy": you can easily poke a spoon through it and it's not an inch
thick.)

Terry, I often use a "cream biscuit" dough for topping a cobbler. If
you've not made them, cream biscuits are unusually light and delicate.
For cobbler, I would increase the sugar to 3-4 tablespoons.

Obviously, the thickness of the topping is largely dependent on how
thick you put the dough on before baking. If you want it thinner, I'd
not exceed ~1/4 inch.

2 cups self-rising flour, plus more for dusting
1 tablespoon sugar
1 1/2 cups heavy whipping cream

Preheat oven to 500 degrees F.
In a medium bowl, stir together the flour, sugar, and cream until the
dough forms a ball. Turn the dough out onto a surface dusted with
additional flour. Fold the dough in 1/2 and knead 5 to 7 times, adding
just enough flour to keep dough from sticking to your hands. Gently
roll out dough to 1/2-inch thickness. Using a 3-inch biscuit cutter
coated with flour, cut dough into biscuits. Place on baking sheet
coated with cooking spray, leaving at least 1-inch between each
biscuit. Bake for 10 minutes, or until golden brown.

HTH

--
Wayne Boatwright **


Wayne, is self rising flour like a premade biscuit mix?
Thanks....Sharon


No, the biscuit mix also contains shortening or oil in addition to the
flour and leavening. Self-rising flour contains only flour, leavening, and
salt.

You can make your own... To make 1 cup of self-rising flour, take 1 cup
all-purpose flour and add 1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder and 1/2 teaspoon
salt.


Thanks Wayne....Sharon

--
Wayne Boatwright **
_____________________________

http://tinypic.com/eikz78.jpg

Meet Mr. Bailey



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Old 21-10-2005, 03:51 PM
Chris Neidecker
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cobbler Query


"biig" wrote in message ...


Wayne Boatwright wrote:

On Fri 21 Oct 2005 06:27:45a, biig wrote in rec.food.cooking:


Wayne, is self rising flour like a premade biscuit mix?
Thanks....Sharon


No, the biscuit mix also contains shortening or oil in addition to the
flour and leavening. Self-rising flour contains only flour, leavening,
and
salt.

You can make your own... To make 1 cup of self-rising flour, take 1 cup
all-purpose flour and add 1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder and 1/2 teaspoon
salt.


Thanks Wayne....Sharon


There! A little trimming at this point helps and doesn't hurt. Less
scrolling for everybody else.


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Old 21-10-2005, 04:04 PM
Marcella Peek
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cobbler Query

In article ,
Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:

My mother made a really great fruit cobbler and I have her recipe
around here somewhere fists on hips, scanning recipe software, old
3x5 cards, old journal-type recipe book and I cannot find the d*mned
thing. I've made cobblers for years and have never really been happy
with the topping. Too dense, but I can't find a recipe that produces
the light, fluffy topping my mother made. Anyone have a good topping
recipe that is, uh, light and fluffy? (Okay, Tee, define "light and
fluffy": you can easily poke a spoon through it and it's not an inch
thick.)

TIA,
Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd


This one is cake like. We really like it.

Fresh Peach Cobbler
1 1/2 C thinly sliced peaches
1 C sugar
1/4 C water
1 egg
1 T shortening
1 T milk
1/2 C flour
1/2 t baking powder
1/4 t salt
Preheat oven to 375 and grease an 11 x 7 inch baking dish.

In a medium sized saucepan, combine peaches, 1/2 C sugar and water.
Bring to a boil, stirring frequently. Remove from heat.

In a bowl beat together the egg, remaining 1/2 C sugar and the
shortening until fluffy. Add milk and stir in the flour, baking powder
and salt.

Spread batter in greased baking dish and pour hot peaches over all.
Bake 25 to 30 minutes and serve warm.

serves 6

marcella
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Old 25-10-2005, 03:57 AM
Terry Pulliam Burd
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cobbler Query

On 21 Oct 2005 05:47:55 +0200, Wayne Boatwright
wrote:

Terry, I often use a "cream biscuit" dough for topping a cobbler. If
you've not made them, cream biscuits are unusually light and delicate. For
cobbler, I would increase the sugar to 3-4 tablespoons.


Ah, yes - makes perfect sense to use a cream biscuit, although I like
your proportions better than the recipe I have, which is the one that
is way too dense.

Thanks.

Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA

"If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

-- Duncan Hines

To reply, replace "spaminator" with "cox"

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Old 25-10-2005, 04:42 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cobbler Query

On Mon 24 Oct 2005 07:57:17p, Terry Pulliam Burd wrote in
rec.food.cooking:

On 21 Oct 2005 05:47:55 +0200, Wayne Boatwright
wrote:

Terry, I often use a "cream biscuit" dough for topping a cobbler. If
you've not made them, cream biscuits are unusually light and delicate.
For cobbler, I would increase the sugar to 3-4 tablespoons.


Ah, yes - makes perfect sense to use a cream biscuit, although I like
your proportions better than the recipe I have, which is the one that
is way too dense.

Thanks.


You're welcome! Hope it works well for you.

--
Wayne Boatwright **
_____________________________

http://tinypic.com/eikz78.jpg

Meet Mr. Bailey


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