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  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-07-2005, 07:48 PM
Pandora
 
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"Dee Randall" ha scritto nel messaggio
...

"Pandora" wrote in message
...

"Dee Randall" ha scritto nel messaggio
...

"Pandora" wrote in message
...

"Boron Elgar" ha scritto nel messaggio
...
On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 10:52:35 +0200, "Pandora"
wrote:

Yesterday I made a trip with my boyfriend in the nothern of Piemonte.
I went
to Formazza (Verbania), a little country near Switzerland about at
1300 at
sea level.
Here we have ate *chestnut dumplings* (gnocchi di castagne), seasoned
with
butter and sage.
And then some local cheese and salami.
I hadn't made the photo of chestnut dumplings, but I would like to
make
them because they were very very good.
I ask myself if in Us you have the chestnut flour indispensable for
this
dish.
Here his some photo of the country I visited and I hope you enjoy them
like
I do:
http://tinypic.com/9hs6mv.jpg
http://tinypic.com/9hs6xs.jpg
http://tinypic.com/9hs70x.jpg
http://tinypic.com/9hs77n.jpg
http://tinypic.com/9hs8p1.jpg

When I will make dumplings, I will send you other photos.
Cheers
Pandora




I would love a recipe. I have some wonderful sage in the garden that
would be perfect.

A cheese suggestion, too, please....Does this need to be a grated
cheese such as a Parmigiano or Pecorino? I wonder how a gorgonzola
would taste crumbled over the gnocchi?

Gorgonzola, IMHO, has a very hard taste, so it would cover delicacy of
this kind of Gnocchi. that's why they put over only butter and sage.
On the other hand, butter and sage, aren't so flavourful. Perhaps it
would go better a creamy sauce with walnuts, "Fontina" (a piedmontese
cheese), few milk to melt cheese and if you want few minced sausage.
Yes, I think i will do like this.
To make chestnut dumplings is very simple: boil 5-6 medium potatoes and
when they are soft, peel and squash them over the pastry board. Make an
hole inside. Then put in the hole two whole eggs and mix with potatoes.
At this point you can start to add chestnut flour. You must add flour
till the mixture is rather hard.
Then you take a piece of mixture (as big as a tennis ball) and roll it
over the floured pastry board (back and forth) with the hand's palms.
It should comes out a long snake of pastry ( about one centimeter of
diameter) that you will cut with a knife in little rectangle of about
2 centimeters lenght.
Put your Gnocchi on a big and floured tray (if you want you can froze
them with the tray, and when they are hard you can put in a freezer
container).
When the salted water boil (put in the water also 1-2 spoons of oil),
plunge gnocchi and mix a little (with a long spoon) only the first
time. Gnocchi are ready when they come on the surface.
This is what I will do next saturday. Then I will tell you, but if you
want to try before., you can follow this recipe.

Chestnut flour can easily be ordered online here in the US.

Is a fortune ))

Cheers
Pandora

"Fontina" (a piedmontese cheese),

I've been looking all over for this for perhaps 6 months (or more) and
can only find Wisconsin, Swedish and Danish Fontina. Nosiree, no
Italian Fontina.
Dee Dee


Ohhhhh! It's a very pity!!! And have you got french cheese? *Raclette* is
a very good cheese and very similar to fontina!
Pandora (

I believe I saw Raclette other day at Trader Joe's. I'll look for it.
I found at Wegman's a wonderful cheese I hadn't had in years, Morbier.
For those who don't know it
http://www.interfrance.com/en/fc/ga_la-fromagerie.html & stroll down to
'Morbier.' It was heaven.

Yes! i saw raclette! I think is better than fontina!!! And I saw Morbier! I
haven't tasted it but I think (at a first look) it is the middle between a
Fontina and a Gorgonzola,but mor hard and soft than Gorgonzola! I think it
is ok for this preparation.

Thanks for sending pictures of Switzerland -- I've only been there a few
times,. There is a place settled in West Virginia by the Swiss, called
Helvetia. People flock there in the summer for some sort of festival. It
is very remote and mountainous -- but, of course, not like Switzerland's
mountains.


Nice! You have a little part of Europe )))
Let me know what kind of cheese you'll be able to find !!!!Cheers
Pandora



  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-07-2005, 08:01 PM
sf
 
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Default

On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 10:52:35 +0200, Pandora wrote:

http://tinypic.com/9hs8p1.jpg


What's a totem pole doing in Italy?
  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-07-2005, 10:11 PM
Doug Freyburger
 
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Default

sf wrote:
Pandora wrote:

http://tinypic.com/9hs8p1.jpg


What's a totem pole doing in Italy?


Trying to beat the Roving Gnome to the recipe
for chestnut dumplings, of course.

  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-07-2005, 11:12 PM
Bob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Pandora replied:

I use chestnut flour in the wintertime to make chestnut polenta, which
I serve with pork braised in milk. It's a wonderful combination.


This is a very good idea! I've never made it. I must try. Coul you give me
the recipe also for pork braised in milk? I make a pork roast with milk; I
want to confront my recipe with yours.


This is the recipe I follow; it was posted by evergene in this group back in
1995:

---------------------------------------------------------------------
This recipe and the next one come from "The Classic Italian Cookbook", by
Marcella Hazan. They are interesting and very tasty. Be advised, however,
that Ms. Hazan is, uh, fussy. (We used to refer to her as "She Who Must Be
Obeyed".) Note that she calls for slices of meat "3/8 inch thick."

Pork Loin Braised in Milk
(from "The Classic Italian Cookbook", by Marcella Hazan)

(She writes Pork loin cooked by this method turns out to be exceptionally
tender and juicy. It is quite delicate, because it loses all its fat and
the milk, as such, disappears, to be replaced by clusters of delicious,
nut-brown sauce.)

2 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 pounds pork loin in one piece, with some fat on it, securely tied
1 teaspoon salt
Freshly ground black pepper
2 1/2 cups milk

1. Heat the butter and oil over medium-high heat in a casserole large enough
to just contain the pork. When the butter foam subsides add the meat, fat
side facing down. Brown thoroughly on all sides, lowering the heat if the
butter starts to turn dark brown.

2. Add the salt, pepper and milk. (Add the milk slowly, otherwise it may
boil over.) Shortly after the milk comes to a boil, turn the heat down to
medium, cover, but not tightly, with the lid partly askew, and cook slowly
for about 1 1/2 to 2 hours, until the meat is easily pierced by a fork.
Turn and baste the meat from time to time, and, if necessary, add a little
milk. By the time the meat is cooked the milk should have coagulated into
small nut-brown clusters. If it is still pale in color, uncover the pot,
raise the heat to high, and cook briskly until it darkens.

3. Remove the meat to a cutting board and allow to cool off slightly for a
few minutes. Remove the trussing string, carve into slices 3/8 inch thick,
and arrange them on a warm platter. Draw off most of the fat from the pot
with a spoon and discard, being careful not to discard any of the coagulated
milk clusters. Taste and correct for salt. (There may be as much as 1 to 1
1/2 cups of fat to be removed.) Add 2 or 3 tablespoons of warm water, turn
the heat to high, and boil away the water while scraping and loosening all
the cooking residue in the pot. Spoon the sauce over the sliced pork and
serve immediately.
---------------------------------------------------------------------

Although it isn't authentic, I usually add prunes or dried apricots to the
milk right at the beginning.

Bob


  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-07-2005, 11:58 PM
Pandora
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"sf" ha scritto nel messaggio
...
On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 10:52:35 +0200, Pandora wrote:

http://tinypic.com/9hs8p1.jpg


What's a totem pole doing in Italy?


It was made by the Italians Indians))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))
DDDDDDDDDDDDDDD
(I don't know, but in nothern Italy there are many trees and many
sculptors!!!)
Cheers
Pandora




  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-07-2005, 12:54 AM
Arri London
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Shaun aRe wrote:

"Pandora" wrote in message
...
Yesterday I made a trip with my boyfriend in the nothern of Piemonte. I

went
to Formazza (Verbania), a little country near Switzerland about at 1300 at
sea level.
Here we have ate *chestnut dumplings* (gnocchi di castagne), seasoned with
butter and sage.
And then some local cheese and salami.
I hadn't made the photo of chestnut dumplings, but I would like to make
them because they were very very good.
I ask myself if in Us you have the chestnut flour indispensable for this
dish.
Here his some photo of the country I visited and I hope you enjoy them

like
I do:
http://tinypic.com/9hs6mv.jpg
http://tinypic.com/9hs6xs.jpg
http://tinypic.com/9hs70x.jpg
http://tinypic.com/9hs77n.jpg
http://tinypic.com/9hs8p1.jpg

When I will make dumplings, I will send you other photos.
Cheers
Pandora


I'd love to see a recipe for those gnocchi! - They sound delicious.

Never heard of chestnut flour before, I must admit (I'm in the UK).

Cheers,

Shaun aRe


Many whole food shops carry chestnut flour, as do Italian delis in
London.
  #22 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-07-2005, 02:16 AM
Boron Elgar
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 19:09:13 +0200, "Pandora"
wrote:


"Boron Elgar" ha scritto nel messaggio
.. .



When I will make dumplings, I will send you other photos.
Cheers
Pandora




I would love a recipe. I have some wonderful sage in the garden that
would be perfect.

A cheese suggestion, too, please....Does this need to be a grated
cheese such as a Parmigiano or Pecorino? I wonder how a gorgonzola
would taste crumbled over the gnocchi?


Gorgonzola, IMHO, has a very hard taste, so it would cover delicacy of this
kind of Gnocchi. that's why they put over only butter and sage.
On the other hand, butter and sage, aren't so flavourful. Perhaps it would
go better a creamy sauce with walnuts, "Fontina" (a piedmontese cheese), few
milk to melt cheese and if you want few minced sausage. Yes, I think i will
do like this.
To make chestnut dumplings is very simple: boil 5-6 medium potatoes and when
they are soft, peel and squash them over the pastry board. Make an hole
inside. Then put in the hole two whole eggs and mix with potatoes. At this
point you can start to add chestnut flour. You must add flour till the
mixture is rather hard.
Then you take a piece of mixture (as big as a tennis ball) and roll it over
the floured pastry board (back and forth) with the hand's palms. It should
comes out a long snake of pastry ( about one centimeter of diameter) that
you will cut with a knife in little rectangle of about 2 centimeters lenght.
Put your Gnocchi on a big and floured tray (if you want you can froze them
with the tray, and when they are hard you can put in a freezer container).
When the salted water boil (put in the water also 1-2 spoons of oil), plunge
gnocchi and mix a little (with a long spoon) only the first time. Gnocchi
are ready when they come on the surface.
This is what I will do next saturday. Then I will tell you, but if you want
to try before., you can follow this recipe.

Chestnut flour can easily be ordered online here in the US.


Is a fortune ))

Cheers
Pandora

Potatoes? Like a regular gnocchi? I had looked around on the net and
most recipes had just the chestnut and regular or wheat flour. How
interesting!

Thank you so much.

Gloria
  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-07-2005, 02:18 AM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Arri London" wrote in message
...


Shaun aRe wrote:

"Pandora" wrote in message
...
Yesterday I made a trip with my boyfriend in the nothern of Piemonte. I

went
to Formazza (Verbania), a little country near Switzerland about at 1300
at
sea level.
Here we have ate *chestnut dumplings* (gnocchi di castagne), seasoned
with
butter and sage.
And then some local cheese and salami.
I hadn't made the photo of chestnut dumplings, but I would like to
make
them because they were very very good.
I ask myself if in Us you have the chestnut flour indispensable for
this
dish.
Here his some photo of the country I visited and I hope you enjoy them

like
I do:
http://tinypic.com/9hs6mv.jpg
http://tinypic.com/9hs6xs.jpg
http://tinypic.com/9hs70x.jpg
http://tinypic.com/9hs77n.jpg
http://tinypic.com/9hs8p1.jpg

When I will make dumplings, I will send you other photos.
Cheers
Pandora


I'd love to see a recipe for those gnocchi! - They sound delicious.

Never heard of chestnut flour before, I must admit (I'm in the UK).

Cheers,

Shaun aRe


Many whole food shops carry chestnut flour, as do Italian delis in
London.


I've bought Chestnut flour in Asian markets and Indian (the continent)
markets.
Dee Dee


  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-07-2005, 03:09 AM
Carole Beard
 
Posts: n/a
Default

  #25 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-07-2005, 07:21 AM
Pandora
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Bob" ha scritto nel messaggio
...
Pandora replied:

I use chestnut flour in the wintertime to make chestnut polenta, which
I serve with pork braised in milk. It's a wonderful combination.


This is a very good idea! I've never made it. I must try. Coul you give
me
the recipe also for pork braised in milk? I make a pork roast with milk;
I
want to confront my recipe with yours.


This is the recipe I follow; it was posted by evergene in this group back
in
1995:

---------------------------------------------------------------------
This recipe and the next one come from "The Classic Italian Cookbook", by
Marcella Hazan. They are interesting and very tasty. Be advised,
however,
that Ms. Hazan is, uh, fussy. (We used to refer to her as "She Who Must
Be
Obeyed".) Note that she calls for slices of meat "3/8 inch thick."

Pork Loin Braised in Milk
(from "The Classic Italian Cookbook", by Marcella Hazan)

(She writes Pork loin cooked by this method turns out to be
exceptionally
tender and juicy. It is quite delicate, because it loses all its fat and
the milk, as such, disappears, to be replaced by clusters of delicious,
nut-brown sauce.)

2 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 pounds pork loin in one piece, with some fat on it, securely tied
1 teaspoon salt
Freshly ground black pepper
2 1/2 cups milk

1. Heat the butter and oil over medium-high heat in a casserole large
enough
to just contain the pork. When the butter foam subsides add the meat, fat
side facing down. Brown thoroughly on all sides, lowering the heat if the
butter starts to turn dark brown.

2. Add the salt, pepper and milk. (Add the milk slowly, otherwise it may
boil over.) Shortly after the milk comes to a boil, turn the heat down to
medium, cover, but not tightly, with the lid partly askew, and cook slowly
for about 1 1/2 to 2 hours, until the meat is easily pierced by a fork.
Turn and baste the meat from time to time, and, if necessary, add a little
milk. By the time the meat is cooked the milk should have coagulated into
small nut-brown clusters. If it is still pale in color, uncover the pot,
raise the heat to high, and cook briskly until it darkens.

3. Remove the meat to a cutting board and allow to cool off slightly for
a
few minutes. Remove the trussing string, carve into slices 3/8 inch
thick,
and arrange them on a warm platter. Draw off most of the fat from the pot
with a spoon and discard, being careful not to discard any of the
coagulated
milk clusters. Taste and correct for salt. (There may be as much as 1 to
1
1/2 cups of fat to be removed.) Add 2 or 3 tablespoons of warm water,
turn
the heat to high, and boil away the water while scraping and loosening all
the cooking residue in the pot. Spoon the sauce over the sliced pork and
serve immediately.
---------------------------------------------------------------------

Although it isn't authentic, I usually add prunes or dried apricots to the
milk right at the beginning.

Bob


Thank you Bob. Good recipe!
My recipe is similar. The only differences are these:
1) I lard the meat with pieces of bacon;
2) I brown the meat in butter and oil with a cloves of garlic and some
rosemary (rosemary give a particular and good taste to this dish), then I
wet with 1/2 glass of white wine.
3) I put a spoon of mustard in the milk.
4) I cook the pork in the oven for about 45 minutes;
-------------------------------------------------------------
I have made another dish with pork. Very very goooood!
It is loin with ananas and apples.
Cheers Bob and thanks for the recipe!
Pandora




  #26 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-07-2005, 07:43 AM
Pandora
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Boron Elgar" ha scritto nel messaggio
...
On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 19:09:13 +0200, "Pandora"
wrote:


"Boron Elgar" ha scritto nel messaggio
. ..



When I will make dumplings, I will send you other photos.
Cheers
Pandora




I would love a recipe. I have some wonderful sage in the garden that
would be perfect.

A cheese suggestion, too, please....Does this need to be a grated
cheese such as a Parmigiano or Pecorino? I wonder how a gorgonzola
would taste crumbled over the gnocchi?


Gorgonzola, IMHO, has a very hard taste, so it would cover delicacy of
this
kind of Gnocchi. that's why they put over only butter and sage.
On the other hand, butter and sage, aren't so flavourful. Perhaps it would
go better a creamy sauce with walnuts, "Fontina" (a piedmontese cheese),
few
milk to melt cheese and if you want few minced sausage. Yes, I think i
will
do like this.
To make chestnut dumplings is very simple: boil 5-6 medium potatoes and
when
they are soft, peel and squash them over the pastry board. Make an hole
inside. Then put in the hole two whole eggs and mix with potatoes. At this
point you can start to add chestnut flour. You must add flour till the
mixture is rather hard.
Then you take a piece of mixture (as big as a tennis ball) and roll it
over
the floured pastry board (back and forth) with the hand's palms. It should
comes out a long snake of pastry ( about one centimeter of diameter) that
you will cut with a knife in little rectangle of about 2 centimeters
lenght.
Put your Gnocchi on a big and floured tray (if you want you can froze them
with the tray, and when they are hard you can put in a freezer container).
When the salted water boil (put in the water also 1-2 spoons of oil),
plunge
gnocchi and mix a little (with a long spoon) only the first time. Gnocchi
are ready when they come on the surface.
This is what I will do next saturday. Then I will tell you, but if you
want
to try before., you can follow this recipe.

Chestnut flour can easily be ordered online here in the US.


Is a fortune ))

Cheers
Pandora

Potatoes? Like a regular gnocchi? I had looked around on the net and
most recipes had just the chestnut and regular or wheat flour. How
interesting!
Thank you so much.
Gloria


I Am sure that if you put only flour, Gnocchi come out too hard and
difficult to digest!!!!
Cheers
Pandora


  #27 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-07-2005, 07:47 AM
Pandora
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Carole Beard" ha scritto nel messaggio ...
Recipe please. Thank you, and enjoy while you are there.

Thank you Carole! What beautiful flowered signature you have!!!!!!!
I'll give you recipe as soon as possible. I will make Gnocchi today or tomorrow.
Cheers
Pandora




------------------------------------------------------------------------------











  #28 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-07-2005, 01:11 PM
Shaun aRe
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Arri London" wrote in message
...


Shaun aRe wrote:

"Pandora" wrote in message
...
Yesterday I made a trip with my boyfriend in the nothern of Piemonte.

I
went
to Formazza (Verbania), a little country near Switzerland about at

1300 at
sea level.
Here we have ate *chestnut dumplings* (gnocchi di castagne), seasoned

with
butter and sage.
And then some local cheese and salami.
I hadn't made the photo of chestnut dumplings, but I would like to

make
them because they were very very good.
I ask myself if in Us you have the chestnut flour indispensable for

this
dish.
Here his some photo of the country I visited and I hope you enjoy them

like
I do:
http://tinypic.com/9hs6mv.jpg
http://tinypic.com/9hs6xs.jpg
http://tinypic.com/9hs70x.jpg
http://tinypic.com/9hs77n.jpg
http://tinypic.com/9hs8p1.jpg

When I will make dumplings, I will send you other photos.
Cheers
Pandora


I'd love to see a recipe for those gnocchi! - They sound delicious.

Never heard of chestnut flour before, I must admit (I'm in the UK).

Cheers,

Shaun aRe


Many whole food shops carry chestnut flour, as do Italian delis in
London.


Ahh, thanks - will look in the w/f places. No It. delis here many many many
miles from The London, unfortunately (but I'd not move to London for all the
delis in the damned world!).

Cheers,


Shaun aRe


  #29 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-07-2005, 01:32 PM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Shaun aRe" wrote in message
eenews.net...

"Arri London" wrote in message
...


Shaun aRe wrote:

"Pandora" wrote in message
...
Yesterday I made a trip with my boyfriend in the nothern of Piemonte.

I
went
to Formazza (Verbania), a little country near Switzerland about at

1300 at
sea level.
Here we have ate *chestnut dumplings* (gnocchi di castagne), seasoned

with
butter and sage.
And then some local cheese and salami.
I hadn't made the photo of chestnut dumplings, but I would like to

make
them because they were very very good.
I ask myself if in Us you have the chestnut flour indispensable for

this
dish.
Here his some photo of the country I visited and I hope you enjoy
them
like
I do:
http://tinypic.com/9hs6mv.jpg
http://tinypic.com/9hs6xs.jpg
http://tinypic.com/9hs70x.jpg
http://tinypic.com/9hs77n.jpg
http://tinypic.com/9hs8p1.jpg



Many whole food shops carry chestnut flour, as do Italian delis in
London.


Ahh, thanks - will look in the w/f places. No It. delis here many many
many
miles from The London, unfortunately (but I'd not move to London for all
the
delis in the damned world!).

Cheers,
Shaun aRe


I've only been to London once and that was 30+ years ago and then it was too
crowded; I wonder what it is today. I feel the same about NY, although it
is an exciting thought to think about all the delis there.
Dee Dee


  #30 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-07-2005, 01:34 PM
MOMPEAGRAM
 
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Default

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"Carole Beard" wrote in message
...
Recipe please. Thank you, and enjoy while you are there.




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