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Old 14-01-2005, 11:24 PM
seacrest
 
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Default Chestnut Flour

I have a recipe for Pane di Castagne that calls for a small amount of
chestnut flour. I'm wondering if anyone has ever used this in their breads
and if there might be a good substitute. I've found online sources to buy
but it doesn't seem available in my area markets. From what I've read it's
added to many italian doughs and is sweet. The sweet I can duplicate but
I'm thinking it's probably necessary to a good textured bread.

Thanks,

Eve




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Old 15-01-2005, 01:05 AM
Bob
 
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Default

Eve wrote:

I have a recipe for Pane di Castagne that calls for a small amount of
chestnut flour. I'm wondering if anyone has ever used this in their
breads and if there might be a good substitute. I've found online
sources to buy but it doesn't seem available in my area markets. From
what I've read it's added to many italian doughs and is sweet. The
sweet I can duplicate but I'm thinking it's probably necessary to a good
textured bread.


Chestnut flour is only barely sweet. I'm guessing that its inclusion in the
recipe is for greater tenderness rather than for sweetness. If it's just a
small amount, you could try substituting cornstarch, or maybe cornstarch
with a tiny bit of powdered sugar. Could you please post the recipe, so we
could make better-informed guesses?

Hmmm...now that it's winter, it might be time for that milk-braised pork
with chestnut polenta again...

Bob


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Old 15-01-2005, 04:27 PM
seacrest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Bob wrote:
Eve wrote:

I have a recipe for Pane di Castagne that calls for a small amount of
chestnut flour. I'm wondering if anyone has ever used this in their
breads and if there might be a good substitute. I've found online
sources to buy but it doesn't seem available in my area markets.
From what I've read it's added to many italian doughs and is sweet.
The sweet I can duplicate but I'm thinking it's probably necessary
to a good textured bread.


Chestnut flour is only barely sweet. I'm guessing that its inclusion
in the recipe is for greater tenderness rather than for sweetness. If
it's just a small amount, you could try substituting cornstarch, or
maybe cornstarch with a tiny bit of powdered sugar. Could you please
post the recipe, so we could make better-informed guesses?

Hmmm...now that it's winter, it might be time for that milk-braised
pork with chestnut polenta again...

Bob


Good idea. Here it is and I should have mentioned I'm trying to recreate
'pagnatta' bread that I tried recently. Just the most delicious bread I've
had in a long while, especially toasted. Thanks again for any suggestions.
The powdered sugar is a good idea, not sure about adding so much cornstarch
though...maybe coarse cornmeal? hmm, well, take a look, see what you think.




Pane di Castagne

(Chestnut Flour Bread)

Scaled for a home kitchen


Yeast 2 1/4 Tsp. active dry 15 grams cake
Water - warm 1/2 Cup 118 ml
Water - room temperature 1 Cup 236 ml
Flour - unbleached all purpose 1 3/4 Cup + 2 Tbl. 220 grams
Flour - whole wheat 1 1/2 Cups + 2 Tbl 220 grams
*Flour - chestnut * 3/4 Cup 60 grams
Salt 2 tsp. 10 grams
Butter or Olive Oil 5 Tsp. 25 grams

Procedure

Dissolve the yeast in the warm water and allow it to stand for
approximately 5-10 minutes. Add the additional water to the dissolved yeast
mixture. Add the unbleached all-purpose, whole wheat and chestnut flour to
this mixture, and continue to mix until the dough begins to hold together.
Knead the dough to a soft consistency. This takes approximately 4 – 5
minutes by hand or 2 –3 minutes by electric mixer at slow speed.

Add the salt and butter or olive oil Knead until the dough is smooth and
elastic. This takes approximately 6-7 minutes by hand or 4-5 minutes by
electric mixer at slow speed.

Place the dough in a bowl and allow it to rise without drafts until
double (approximately 1 – 1 ¼ hours).

Gently turn the risen dough onto a flour dusted work surface. Dust a
piece of canvas (untreated, 100% cotton), or a proofing board (lumber core
plywood) with flour. Shape the dough into a filone (elongated loaf),
pagnotta (round loaf), or panini (rolls). Large size cookie cutters can also
be used to cut the dough into shapes such as leaves, etc. Place the shaped
dough on the canvas or board. Cover the dough with a cotton towel. Allow it
to rise until it is nearly double (approximately 45 minutes).

As the dough is rising, place a baking stone in the oven and set the
temperature to 400 F. Allow the oven to heat for 30 minutes.

Transfer the filone, pagnotta, panini, or cut shapes to a sheet of
parchment paper. Slide a baker’s peel beneath the parchment paper. Slide the
parchment paper from the peel onto the baking stone. Allow the dough to bake
until it becomes medium brown in color (approximately 30 minutes). After 20
minutes, check the oven to be certain that the dough is not browning too
quickly. If this is the case, cover with foil.

Remove the bread from the oven and allow it to cool on a rack.






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Old 15-01-2005, 04:27 PM
seacrest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Bob wrote:
Eve wrote:

I have a recipe for Pane di Castagne that calls for a small amount of
chestnut flour. I'm wondering if anyone has ever used this in their
breads and if there might be a good substitute. I've found online
sources to buy but it doesn't seem available in my area markets.
From what I've read it's added to many italian doughs and is sweet.
The sweet I can duplicate but I'm thinking it's probably necessary
to a good textured bread.


Chestnut flour is only barely sweet. I'm guessing that its inclusion
in the recipe is for greater tenderness rather than for sweetness. If
it's just a small amount, you could try substituting cornstarch, or
maybe cornstarch with a tiny bit of powdered sugar. Could you please
post the recipe, so we could make better-informed guesses?

Hmmm...now that it's winter, it might be time for that milk-braised
pork with chestnut polenta again...

Bob


Good idea. Here it is and I should have mentioned I'm trying to recreate
'pagnatta' bread that I tried recently. Just the most delicious bread I've
had in a long while, especially toasted. Thanks again for any suggestions.
The powdered sugar is a good idea, not sure about adding so much cornstarch
though...maybe coarse cornmeal? hmm, well, take a look, see what you think.




Pane di Castagne

(Chestnut Flour Bread)

Scaled for a home kitchen


Yeast 2 1/4 Tsp. active dry 15 grams cake
Water - warm 1/2 Cup 118 ml
Water - room temperature 1 Cup 236 ml
Flour - unbleached all purpose 1 3/4 Cup + 2 Tbl. 220 grams
Flour - whole wheat 1 1/2 Cups + 2 Tbl 220 grams
*Flour - chestnut * 3/4 Cup 60 grams
Salt 2 tsp. 10 grams
Butter or Olive Oil 5 Tsp. 25 grams

Procedure

Dissolve the yeast in the warm water and allow it to stand for
approximately 5-10 minutes. Add the additional water to the dissolved yeast
mixture. Add the unbleached all-purpose, whole wheat and chestnut flour to
this mixture, and continue to mix until the dough begins to hold together.
Knead the dough to a soft consistency. This takes approximately 4 – 5
minutes by hand or 2 –3 minutes by electric mixer at slow speed.

Add the salt and butter or olive oil Knead until the dough is smooth and
elastic. This takes approximately 6-7 minutes by hand or 4-5 minutes by
electric mixer at slow speed.

Place the dough in a bowl and allow it to rise without drafts until
double (approximately 1 – 1 ¼ hours).

Gently turn the risen dough onto a flour dusted work surface. Dust a
piece of canvas (untreated, 100% cotton), or a proofing board (lumber core
plywood) with flour. Shape the dough into a filone (elongated loaf),
pagnotta (round loaf), or panini (rolls). Large size cookie cutters can also
be used to cut the dough into shapes such as leaves, etc. Place the shaped
dough on the canvas or board. Cover the dough with a cotton towel. Allow it
to rise until it is nearly double (approximately 45 minutes).

As the dough is rising, place a baking stone in the oven and set the
temperature to 400 F. Allow the oven to heat for 30 minutes.

Transfer the filone, pagnotta, panini, or cut shapes to a sheet of
parchment paper. Slide a baker’s peel beneath the parchment paper. Slide the
parchment paper from the peel onto the baking stone. Allow the dough to bake
until it becomes medium brown in color (approximately 30 minutes). After 20
minutes, check the oven to be certain that the dough is not browning too
quickly. If this is the case, cover with foil.

Remove the bread from the oven and allow it to cool on a rack.






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Old 16-01-2005, 12:21 AM
Arri London
 
Posts: n/a
Default



seacrest wrote:

Bob wrote:
Eve wrote:

I have a recipe for Pane di Castagne that calls for a small amount of
chestnut flour. I'm wondering if anyone has ever used this in their
breads and if there might be a good substitute. I've found online
sources to buy but it doesn't seem available in my area markets.
From what I've read it's added to many italian doughs and is sweet.
The sweet I can duplicate but I'm thinking it's probably necessary
to a good textured bread.


Chestnut flour is only barely sweet. I'm guessing that its inclusion
in the recipe is for greater tenderness rather than for sweetness. If
it's just a small amount, you could try substituting cornstarch, or
maybe cornstarch with a tiny bit of powdered sugar. Could you please
post the recipe, so we could make better-informed guesses?

Hmmm...now that it's winter, it might be time for that milk-braised
pork with chestnut polenta again...

Bob


Good idea. Here it is and I should have mentioned I'm trying to recreate
'pagnatta' bread that I tried recently. Just the most delicious bread I've
had in a long while, especially toasted. Thanks again for any suggestions.
The powdered sugar is a good idea, not sure about adding so much cornstarch
though...maybe coarse cornmeal? hmm, well, take a look, see what you think.



Coarse cornmeal is no substitute for chestnut flour. Try a whole foods
shop for the chestnut flour if you don't have any French or Italian
shops. Cost Plus might have some.


Pane di Castagne

(Chestnut Flour Bread)

Scaled for a home kitchen

Yeast 2 1/4 Tsp. active dry 15 grams cake
Water - warm 1/2 Cup 118 ml
Water - room temperature 1 Cup 236 ml
Flour - unbleached all purpose 1 3/4 Cup + 2 Tbl. 220 grams
Flour - whole wheat 1 1/2 Cups + 2 Tbl 220 grams
*Flour - chestnut * 3/4 Cup 60 grams
Salt 2 tsp. 10 grams
Butter or Olive Oil 5 Tsp. 25 grams

Procedure

Dissolve the yeast in the warm water and allow it to stand for
approximately 5-10 minutes. Add the additional water to the dissolved yeast
mixture. Add the unbleached all-purpose, whole wheat and chestnut flour to
this mixture, and continue to mix until the dough begins to hold together.
Knead the dough to a soft consistency. This takes approximately 4 – 5
minutes by hand or 2 –3 minutes by electric mixer at slow speed.

Add the salt and butter or olive oil Knead until the dough is smooth and
elastic. This takes approximately 6-7 minutes by hand or 4-5 minutes by
electric mixer at slow speed.

Place the dough in a bowl and allow it to rise without drafts until
double (approximately 1 – 1 ¼ hours).

Gently turn the risen dough onto a flour dusted work surface. Dust a
piece of canvas (untreated, 100% cotton), or a proofing board (lumber core
plywood) with flour. Shape the dough into a filone (elongated loaf),
pagnotta (round loaf), or panini (rolls). Large size cookie cutters can also
be used to cut the dough into shapes such as leaves, etc. Place the shaped
dough on the canvas or board. Cover the dough with a cotton towel. Allow it
to rise until it is nearly double (approximately 45 minutes).

As the dough is rising, place a baking stone in the oven and set the
temperature to 400 F. Allow the oven to heat for 30 minutes.

Transfer the filone, pagnotta, panini, or cut shapes to a sheet of
parchment paper. Slide a baker’s peel beneath the parchment paper. Slide the
parchment paper from the peel onto the baking stone. Allow the dough to bake
until it becomes medium brown in color (approximately 30 minutes). After 20
minutes, check the oven to be certain that the dough is not browning too
quickly. If this is the case, cover with foil.

Remove the bread from the oven and allow it to cool on a rack.



  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 16-01-2005, 12:21 AM
Arri London
 
Posts: n/a
Default



seacrest wrote:

Bob wrote:
Eve wrote:

I have a recipe for Pane di Castagne that calls for a small amount of
chestnut flour. I'm wondering if anyone has ever used this in their
breads and if there might be a good substitute. I've found online
sources to buy but it doesn't seem available in my area markets.
From what I've read it's added to many italian doughs and is sweet.
The sweet I can duplicate but I'm thinking it's probably necessary
to a good textured bread.


Chestnut flour is only barely sweet. I'm guessing that its inclusion
in the recipe is for greater tenderness rather than for sweetness. If
it's just a small amount, you could try substituting cornstarch, or
maybe cornstarch with a tiny bit of powdered sugar. Could you please
post the recipe, so we could make better-informed guesses?

Hmmm...now that it's winter, it might be time for that milk-braised
pork with chestnut polenta again...

Bob


Good idea. Here it is and I should have mentioned I'm trying to recreate
'pagnatta' bread that I tried recently. Just the most delicious bread I've
had in a long while, especially toasted. Thanks again for any suggestions.
The powdered sugar is a good idea, not sure about adding so much cornstarch
though...maybe coarse cornmeal? hmm, well, take a look, see what you think.



Coarse cornmeal is no substitute for chestnut flour. Try a whole foods
shop for the chestnut flour if you don't have any French or Italian
shops. Cost Plus might have some.


Pane di Castagne

(Chestnut Flour Bread)

Scaled for a home kitchen

Yeast 2 1/4 Tsp. active dry 15 grams cake
Water - warm 1/2 Cup 118 ml
Water - room temperature 1 Cup 236 ml
Flour - unbleached all purpose 1 3/4 Cup + 2 Tbl. 220 grams
Flour - whole wheat 1 1/2 Cups + 2 Tbl 220 grams
*Flour - chestnut * 3/4 Cup 60 grams
Salt 2 tsp. 10 grams
Butter or Olive Oil 5 Tsp. 25 grams

Procedure

Dissolve the yeast in the warm water and allow it to stand for
approximately 5-10 minutes. Add the additional water to the dissolved yeast
mixture. Add the unbleached all-purpose, whole wheat and chestnut flour to
this mixture, and continue to mix until the dough begins to hold together.
Knead the dough to a soft consistency. This takes approximately 4 – 5
minutes by hand or 2 –3 minutes by electric mixer at slow speed.

Add the salt and butter or olive oil Knead until the dough is smooth and
elastic. This takes approximately 6-7 minutes by hand or 4-5 minutes by
electric mixer at slow speed.

Place the dough in a bowl and allow it to rise without drafts until
double (approximately 1 – 1 ¼ hours).

Gently turn the risen dough onto a flour dusted work surface. Dust a
piece of canvas (untreated, 100% cotton), or a proofing board (lumber core
plywood) with flour. Shape the dough into a filone (elongated loaf),
pagnotta (round loaf), or panini (rolls). Large size cookie cutters can also
be used to cut the dough into shapes such as leaves, etc. Place the shaped
dough on the canvas or board. Cover the dough with a cotton towel. Allow it
to rise until it is nearly double (approximately 45 minutes).

As the dough is rising, place a baking stone in the oven and set the
temperature to 400 F. Allow the oven to heat for 30 minutes.

Transfer the filone, pagnotta, panini, or cut shapes to a sheet of
parchment paper. Slide a baker’s peel beneath the parchment paper. Slide the
parchment paper from the peel onto the baking stone. Allow the dough to bake
until it becomes medium brown in color (approximately 30 minutes). After 20
minutes, check the oven to be certain that the dough is not browning too
quickly. If this is the case, cover with foil.

Remove the bread from the oven and allow it to cool on a rack.



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