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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Puester
 
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Default It's snowing.....


and one of our apricot trees is in full bloom. I took my grandson
out int he yard to see it yesterday and it was glorious, every branch
lined thickly with blossoms, and bees all over the place.

So it's snowing and the temperature is dropping rapidly. That's a
good sign that there won't be any fruit on the trees this year, either
so I'll have to buy fruit for jam. Dang. I don't think we've had a
crop since 1998.

gloria p
from the Colorado Front Range Arctic
  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
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Default

In article
>,
Puester > wrote:

> and one of our apricot trees is in full bloom. I took my grandson
> out int he yard to see it yesterday and it was glorious, every branch
> lined thickly with blossoms, and bees all over the place.
>
> So it's snowing and the temperature is dropping rapidly. That's a
> good sign that there won't be any fruit on the trees this year, either
> so I'll have to buy fruit for jam. Dang. I don't think we've had a
> crop since 1998.
>
> gloria p
> from the Colorado Front Range Arctic


Seriously, start a small fire in a container close to the base of the
tree and use a good hard wood, try to keep it burning all night...

Run a fan on one side to distribute the heat evenly around the tree.

They used to use heaters/smudge pots and large overhead fans in the
cherry orchards near where I used to live for just such occasions! :-)

Good luck!!!!

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


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  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
nancree
 
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Default

Katra wrote:
"They used to use heaters/smudge pots and large overhead fans in the
cherry orchards near where I used to live for just such occasions! :-)
"

Smudge pots. Oh yes, I remember smudge pots. I went to college a few
miles east of Los Angeles while smudge pots were still allowed. You'd
wake up in the morning with two black streaks going up your nostrils,
from the smudge smoke. Can't imagine what it did to our lungs.

Nancree



  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dave Smith
 
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Puester wrote:

> and one of our apricot trees is in full bloom. I took my grandson
> out int he yard to see it yesterday and it was glorious, every branch
> lined thickly with blossoms, and bees all over the place.
>
> So it's snowing and the temperature is dropping rapidly. That's a
> good sign that there won't be any fruit on the trees this year, either
> so I'll have to buy fruit for jam. Dang. I don't think we've had a
> crop since 1998.


Dang, that's a major problem with apricots. They will survive our southern
Ontario winters but they bloom early and do not take kindly to cold
weather during or after blooming.





  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
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Default

In article .com>,
"nancree" > wrote:

> Katra wrote:
> "They used to use heaters/smudge pots and large overhead fans in the
> cherry orchards near where I used to live for just such occasions! :-)
> "
>
> Smudge pots. Oh yes, I remember smudge pots. I went to college a few
> miles east of Los Angeles while smudge pots were still allowed. You'd
> wake up in the morning with two black streaks going up your nostrils,
> from the smudge smoke. Can't imagine what it did to our lungs.
>
> Nancree
>


;-)
The ones the cherry orchard used were cleaner and did not produce
smoke... Not sure how they were run, may have been natural gas or
electric?

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Puester
 
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Default

Katra wrote:
> In article
> >,
> Puester > wrote:


>>
>>So it's snowing and the temperature is dropping rapidly. That's a
>>good sign that there won't be any fruit on the trees this year, either
>>so I'll have to buy fruit for jam. Dang. I don't think we've had a
>>crop since 1998.
>>
>>gloria p
>>from the Colorado Front Range Arctic

>
>
> Seriously, start a small fire in a container close to the base of the
> tree and use a good hard wood, try to keep it burning all night...
>
> Run a fan on one side to distribute the heat evenly around the tree.
>
> They used to use heaters/smudge pots and large overhead fans in the
> cherry orchards near where I used to live for just such occasions! :-)
>
> Good luck!!!!
>


Yabbut that was before the days of Clean Air and the EPA.
If we lit an outdoor fire our neighbors would call the
Fire Dept. so fast it woul;d make your head spin.

gloria p
  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Damsel in dis Dress
 
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Puester >, if that's their real name, wrote:

>If we lit an outdoor fire our neighbors would call the
>Fire Dept. so fast it woul;d make your head spin.


Ours wouldn't, because their fire would be bigger.

Carol

--
Coming at you live, from beautiful Lake Woebegon


  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article >,
Puester > wrote:

> Katra wrote:
> > In article
> > >,
> > Puester > wrote:

>
> >>
> >>So it's snowing and the temperature is dropping rapidly. That's a
> >>good sign that there won't be any fruit on the trees this year, either
> >>so I'll have to buy fruit for jam. Dang. I don't think we've had a
> >>crop since 1998.
> >>
> >>gloria p
> >>from the Colorado Front Range Arctic

> >
> >
> > Seriously, start a small fire in a container close to the base of the
> > tree and use a good hard wood, try to keep it burning all night...
> >
> > Run a fan on one side to distribute the heat evenly around the tree.
> >
> > They used to use heaters/smudge pots and large overhead fans in the
> > cherry orchards near where I used to live for just such occasions! :-)
> >
> > Good luck!!!!
> >

>
> Yabbut that was before the days of Clean Air and the EPA.
> If we lit an outdoor fire our neighbors would call the
> Fire Dept. so fast it woul;d make your head spin.
>
> gloria p


Well, ok, can you run a small (covered) electric heater with an
extension cord out there safely???

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Julian Vrieslander
 
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Default

In article
>,
Cindy Fuller > wrote:

> SO decided to try and reproduce the Thai curried salmon from a
> restaurant hereabouts. He came pretty close. The sauce had plenty of
> heat. Very tasty.


The restaurant is Thai Dusit, just north of the University Village Mall
in Seattle. One of our local faves.

The concoction that I made tonight was actually a snap to prepare.

Heat some peanut oil in a large pan and saute a salmon fillet until it
is beginning to brown. Flip it and brown on the other side. Remove
salmon from pan and keep it warm in a low temp oven.

Return pan to the stove and add a dollop of Thai red curry paste (you
want measurements, go read a weather report). Spread the stuff around
and let it cook for a couple of minutes. Then slowly add coconut milk
(I used a low fat variety), stirring constantly, until the sauce has a
thick but fluid consistency. Add sugar to taste, and maybe a splash of
fish sauce (we like the Three Crabs brand). I also tossed in a pinch of
star anise, after grinding it in a mortar.

Put salmon back in the pan, spoon some sauce over it, cover the pan and
let it cook on low heat, just until the fish is opaque all the way
through. Serve with white rice, and sliced scallions for garnish. We
had Cindy's cole slaw (yes, the one with avocado) on the side. A cool
cucumber salad would also be a nice balance to the spicy curry.

--
Julian Vrieslander


  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Chris Neidecker
 
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Default

Thanks, Julian, for sharing the recipe, and thanks Cindy, for dragging him
to the computer to do so.

This looks good...I've never made anything w/ curry paste before, can you
believe that? Though I do have a can of red curry paste around (gosh, how
*old* is it?), and some coconut milk. Will try this soon!

Chris


  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Cindy Fuller
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article <QWU0e.27655$mq2.21252@trnddc08>,
"Chris Neidecker" > wrote:

> Thanks, Julian, for sharing the recipe, and thanks Cindy, for dragging him
> to the computer to do so.
>
> This looks good...I've never made anything w/ curry paste before, can you
> believe that? Though I do have a can of red curry paste around (gosh, how
> *old* is it?), and some coconut milk. Will try this soon!
>
> Chris


I don't have to drag him to the computer, he's often chained to it.

This morning's project is hot cross buns, by request of the SO.
According to British legend, those who make hot cross buns on Good
Friday will have good luck in the coming year. Sure beats black eyed
peas.

Cindy

--
C.J. Fuller

Delete the obvious to email me
  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Puester
 
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Default

Julian Vrieslander wrote:
>
> The concoction that I made tonight was actually a snap to prepare.
>
> Heat some peanut oil in a large pan and saute a salmon fillet until it
> is beginning to brown. Flip it and brown on the other side. Remove
> salmon from pan and keep it warm in a low temp oven.
>
> Return pan to the stove and add a dollop of Thai red curry paste (you
> want measurements, go read a weather report). Spread the stuff around
> and let it cook for a couple of minutes. Then slowly add coconut milk
> (I used a low fat variety), stirring constantly, until the sauce has a
> thick but fluid consistency. Add sugar to taste, and maybe a splash of
> fish sauce (we like the Three Crabs brand). I also tossed in a pinch of
> star anise, after grinding it in a mortar.
>
> Put salmon back in the pan, spoon some sauce over it, cover the pan and
> let it cook on low heat, just until the fish is opaque all the way
> through. Serve with white rice, and sliced scallions for garnish. We
> had Cindy's cole slaw (yes, the one with avocado) on the side. A cool
> cucumber salad would also be a nice balance to the spicy curry.
>




That sounds delicous...and do-able.

Thanks.

gloria p
  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Fudge
 
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Default

What's even worse is all your fruit trees are covered with blossoms and it's
too cold for the bees. Great scenery and smell but no fruit. Sometimes a
late spring frost can kill the blossoms.

That's Life
F.J.
"Puester" > wrote in message
...
>
> and one of our apricot trees is in full bloom. I took my grandson
> out int he yard to see it yesterday and it was glorious, every branch
> lined thickly with blossoms, and bees all over the place.
>
> So it's snowing and the temperature is dropping rapidly. That's a
> good sign that there won't be any fruit on the trees this year, either
> so I'll have to buy fruit for jam. Dang. I don't think we've had a
> crop since 1998.
>
> gloria p
> from the Colorado Front Range Arctic





  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Puester wrote:
> and one of our apricot trees is in full bloom. I took my grandson
> out int he yard to see it yesterday and it was glorious, every branch
> lined thickly with blossoms, and bees all over the place.
>
> So it's snowing and the temperature is dropping rapidly. That's a
> good sign that there won't be any fruit on the trees this year,

either
> so I'll have to buy fruit for jam. Dang. I don't think we've had a
> crop since 1998.


Sounds like your trees are blossoming too soon, you can control that
with mulching. If your fruit hasn't set for 7 years in a row then
there may be something else going on, perhaps the tree needs a cross
pollinator.

http://www.garden.org/foodguide/brow...t/apricot/1455

Sheldon

  #22 (permalink)   Report Post  
Puester
 
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Sheldon wrote:
> Puester wrote:
>
>>and one of our apricot trees is in full bloom. I took my grandson
>>out int he yard to see it yesterday and it was glorious, every branch
>>lined thickly with blossoms, and bees all over the place.
>>
>>So it's snowing and the temperature is dropping rapidly. That's a
>>good sign that there won't be any fruit on the trees this year,

>
> either
>
>>so I'll have to buy fruit for jam. Dang. I don't think we've had a
>>crop since 1998.

>
>
> Sounds like your trees are blossoming too soon, you can control that
> with mulching. If your fruit hasn't set for 7 years in a row then
> there may be something else going on, perhaps the tree needs a cross
> pollinator.
>
> http://www.garden.org/foodguide/brow...t/apricot/1455
>
> Sheldon
>



Thanks, but apricots are very iffy in this climate.
They usually bloom in mid April and we often get frosts
until late May, so either the blossoms or the tiny fruit
freeze. The few years when the weather cooperates, we get
a huge crop from the two trees.

Winter has been so mild till now that we all have had
daffodils in bloom for 3-4 weeks, the irises and day lilies
are up 6 inches or more, and all the deciduous trees have
huge buds ready to open. All those California spring
rainstorms are coming across the Continental Divide as snow.

gloria p
  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
Ed Grabau and Pam Jacoby
 
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"Puester" wrote ...
>
> and one of our apricot trees is in full bloom. I took my grandson
> out int he yard to see it yesterday and it was glorious, every branch
> lined thickly with blossoms, and bees all over the place.
>
> So it's snowing and the temperature is dropping rapidly. That's a
> good sign that there won't be any fruit on the trees this year, either
> so I'll have to buy fruit for jam. Dang. I don't think we've had a crop
> since 1998.
>
> gloria p
> from the Colorado Front Range Arctic


Whereabouts in Colorado are you? Ed and I just bought a house in Woodland
Park, and we need this kind of information re plant life. We love to dig
holes and plant flowers. If, however, we're going to lose perennials on a
regular basis, it's hardly worth the effort.

Thanks,
Pam


  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Puester
 
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Default

Ed Grabau and Pam Jacoby wrote:
> "Puester" wrote ...
>
>>
>>gloria p
>>from the Colorado Front Range Arctic

>
>
> Whereabouts in Colorado are you? Ed and I just bought a house in Woodland
> Park, and we need this kind of information re plant life. We love to dig
> holes and plant flowers. If, however, we're going to lose perennials on a
> regular basis, it's hardly worth the effort.
>
> Thanks,
> Pam
>
>


Isn't that outside of Colo. Springs? We're S.E. Denver suburbs.

Colorado State U. (Ft. Collins) willl be your friend when it
comes to advice on gardening. They have an active Master Gardener
program and lots and lots of materials to offer. Also the Denver
Botanic Garden can provide a lot of information and ideas.

If you want to get an idea of hardy perennials, spend a day in
Breckenridge and Vail this summer and see what they have planted
there. Both towns are all flowers, all summer. I'm not familiar
with garden centers in the Springs area, but Tagawa Gardens on Parker
Rd. just north of Parker is hard to beat.

Be aware that water shortages should influence youir planting as
much as the altitude and cold winters/late springs.

gloria p
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