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Old 22-10-2016, 11:58 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making a White Sauce

Every once in a while, when I get the feeling that my arteries are still
too flexible and my heart isn't working hard enough pumping blood, I'll
make a large skillet of sawmill gravy and pour it over biscuits for
breakfast. The recipe I follow says, as do all the other recipes I've seen
that involve making a white sauce, that once you have the roux the color
you want, you should take the pan off the heat to add the milk. I've often
wondered why that is and what would happen if you added the milk directly
to the pan containing the roux while it's still on the burner. Rather than
risk seven years' bad luck or something similar trying it, I thought I'd
ask. Can any of the RFC intelligentsia enlighten me?

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Old 22-10-2016, 12:51 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making a White Sauce

On Sat, 22 Oct 2016 05:58:30 -0500, Alan Holbrook
wrote:

Every once in a while, when I get the feeling that my arteries are still
too flexible and my heart isn't working hard enough pumping blood, I'll
make a large skillet of sawmill gravy and pour it over biscuits for
breakfast. The recipe I follow says, as do all the other recipes I've seen
that involve making a white sauce, that once you have the roux the color
you want, you should take the pan off the heat to add the milk. I've often
wondered why that is and what would happen if you added the milk directly
to the pan containing the roux while it's still on the burner. Rather than
risk seven years' bad luck or something similar trying it, I thought I'd
ask. Can any of the RFC intelligentsia enlighten me?


Never had any problem with making white sauce but only cook the roux a
couple of minutes to cut the 'flour' taste, certainly don't want it to
colour. I have never taken it off the heat before adding the milk
but I do whisk while adding slowly so it is all incorporated well,
this is the stage where you could get some lumps.
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Old 22-10-2016, 02:42 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making a White Sauce

On 2016-10-22 6:58 AM, Alan Holbrook wrote:
Every once in a while, when I get the feeling that my arteries are still
too flexible and my heart isn't working hard enough pumping blood, I'll
make a large skillet of sawmill gravy and pour it over biscuits for
breakfast. The recipe I follow says, as do all the other recipes I've seen
that involve making a white sauce, that once you have the roux the color
you want, you should take the pan off the heat to add the milk. I've often
wondered why that is and what would happen if you added the milk directly
to the pan containing the roux while it's still on the burner. Rather than
risk seven years' bad luck or something similar trying it, I thought I'd
ask. Can any of the RFC intelligentsia enlighten me?


If you add the milk to the roux in a hot pan it tends to coagulate very
quickly and you end up with a lumpy sauce. It is not the end of the
world. You and whisk it like mad for a long time or maybe use a stick
blender to removed the lumps. It is easier to simply take it off the
heat and avoid the lumps.


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Old 22-10-2016, 03:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making a White Sauce

On Sat, 22 Oct 2016 09:42:26 -0400, Dave Smith
wrote:

On 2016-10-22 6:58 AM, Alan Holbrook wrote:
Every once in a while, when I get the feeling that my arteries are still
too flexible and my heart isn't working hard enough pumping blood, I'll
make a large skillet of sawmill gravy and pour it over biscuits for
breakfast. The recipe I follow says, as do all the other recipes I've seen
that involve making a white sauce, that once you have the roux the color
you want, you should take the pan off the heat to add the milk. I've often
wondered why that is and what would happen if you added the milk directly
to the pan containing the roux while it's still on the burner. Rather than
risk seven years' bad luck or something similar trying it, I thought I'd
ask. Can any of the RFC intelligentsia enlighten me?


If you add the milk to the roux in a hot pan it tends to coagulate very
quickly and you end up with a lumpy sauce. It is not the end of the
world. You and whisk it like mad for a long time or maybe use a stick
blender to removed the lumps. It is easier to simply take it off the
heat and avoid the lumps.

Clearly, judging by other responses, this is a male thing - women are
more dextrous and can do two things at once successfully


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Old 22-10-2016, 03:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making a White Sauce

On 10/22/2016 7:03 AM, wrote:
On Sat, 22 Oct 2016 09:42:26 -0400, Dave Smith
wrote:

On 2016-10-22 6:58 AM, Alan Holbrook wrote:
Every once in a while, when I get the feeling that my arteries are still
too flexible and my heart isn't working hard enough pumping blood, I'll
make a large skillet of sawmill gravy and pour it over biscuits for
breakfast. The recipe I follow says, as do all the other recipes I've seen
that involve making a white sauce, that once you have the roux the color
you want, you should take the pan off the heat to add the milk. I've often
wondered why that is and what would happen if you added the milk directly
to the pan containing the roux while it's still on the burner. Rather than
risk seven years' bad luck or something similar trying it, I thought I'd
ask. Can any of the RFC intelligentsia enlighten me?


If you add the milk to the roux in a hot pan it tends to coagulate very
quickly and you end up with a lumpy sauce. It is not the end of the
world. You and whisk it like mad for a long time or maybe use a stick
blender to removed the lumps. It is easier to simply take it off the
heat and avoid the lumps.

Clearly, judging by other responses, this is a male thing - women are
more dextrous and can do two things at once successfully


lots of recipes are written for the least skilled.
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Old 22-10-2016, 03:21 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making a White Sauce

On 2016-10-22, l not -l wrote:

Since you have to bring it to a boil for the roux to thicken the milk, the
only reason to add it off heat is it smells bad and is hard to cleanup if
you spill/splash milk on the burner.


Yes, you, Lecretia, and Dory, are all correct. The only thing I can
add is a cheater trick. Nuke yer milk to at least warm before adding
it to the roux.

I no longer do it (warm the liquid), as judicious immediate whisking
is enough, but when I first began serious cooking (cooking school),
our chef taught us to heat any liquid before adding to roux.

Zero lumps! I gar-own-tee!!

nb
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Old 22-10-2016, 03:44 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making a White Sauce

Alan Holbrook wrote:

Every once in a while, when I get the feeling that my arteries are still
too flexible and my heart isn't working hard enough pumping blood, I'll
make a large skillet of sawmill gravy and pour it over biscuits for
breakfast. The recipe I follow says, as do all the other recipes I've seen
that involve making a white sauce, that once you have the roux the color
you want,


If you're making a white sauce what's this about the color you want?

you should take the pan off the heat to add the milk. I've often
wondered why that is and what would happen if you added the milk directly
to the pan containing the roux while it's still on the burner. Rather than
risk seven years' bad luck or something similar trying it, I thought I'd
ask. Can any of the RFC intelligentsia enlighten me?


I see no reason to take the pan off heat, but a white sauce (Béchamel)
is made in a heavy pan over low heat with the liquid added/dribbled a
little at a time incorporating each addition before adding more until
it's the consistancy you want... low heat is all important. I prefer
to stir with a wooden spoon rather than a whisk, a whisk misses the
corners of the pan causing lumps to form... I have wooden spoons that
have a flatened end that are worn to fit pan corners. A proper
Béchamel is not to be rushed.
I rarely use wire whisks for anything, they really only work well in
round bottomed bowls, I prefer wooden spoons or my portable electric
KA mixer. I love my KA portable, it has seven speeds, and needs very
little storage space... it's perfect for most any mixing other than
kneading doughs. I no longer have my 12 qt Hobart stand mixer, I no
longer bake large quantities of bread, in fact nowadays I much prefer
my ABM, it does a good job of kneading and half the time I form
loaves/rolls by hand to bake in a regular oven. Amazon still sells my
ABM, I didn't think they were available new anymore. I bought mine
nearly 30 years ago for less than $40:
https://www.amazon.com/Welbilt-Origi...+bread+machine


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Old 22-10-2016, 04:04 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making a White Sauce

On 22 Oct 2016 14:21:03 GMT, notbob wrote:

On 2016-10-22, l not -l wrote:

Since you have to bring it to a boil for the roux to thicken the milk, the
only reason to add it off heat is it smells bad and is hard to cleanup if
you spill/splash milk on the burner.


Yes, you, Lecretia, and Dory, are all correct. The only thing I can
add is a cheater trick. Nuke yer milk to at least warm before adding
it to the roux.

I no longer do it (warm the liquid), as judicious immediate whisking
is enough, but when I first began serious cooking (cooking school),
our chef taught us to heat any liquid before adding to roux.

Zero lumps! I gar-own-tee!!

nb


Yes, good tip for starters - wish he was still around


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Old 22-10-2016, 06:22 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making a White Sauce

On Saturday, October 22, 2016 at 8:44:34 AM UTC-6, Brooklyn1 wrote:
Alan Holbrook wrote:

Every once in a while, when I get the feeling that my arteries are still
too flexible and my heart isn't working hard enough pumping blood, I'll
make a large skillet of sawmill gravy and pour it over biscuits for
breakfast. The recipe I follow says, as do all the other recipes I've seen
that involve making a white sauce, that once you have the roux the color
you want,


If you're making a white sauce what's this about the color you want?

you should take the pan off the heat to add the milk. I've often
wondered why that is and what would happen if you added the milk directly
to the pan containing the roux while it's still on the burner. Rather than
risk seven years' bad luck or something similar trying it, I thought I'd
ask. Can any of the RFC intelligentsia enlighten me?


I see no reason to take the pan off heat, but a white sauce (BĂ©chamel)
is made in a heavy pan over low heat with the liquid added/dribbled a
little at a time incorporating each addition before adding more until
it's the consistancy you want... low heat is all important. I prefer
to stir with a wooden spoon rather than a whisk, a whisk misses the
corners of the pan causing lumps to form... I have wooden spoons that
have a flatened end that are worn to fit pan corners. A proper
BĂ©chamel is not to be rushed.
I rarely use wire whisks for anything, they really only work well in
round bottomed bowls, I prefer wooden spoons or my portable electric
KA mixer. I love my KA portable, it has seven speeds, and needs very
little storage space... it's perfect for most any mixing other than
kneading doughs. I no longer have my 12 qt Hobart stand mixer, I no
longer bake large quantities of bread, in fact nowadays I much prefer
my ABM, it does a good job of kneading and half the time I form
loaves/rolls by hand to bake in a regular oven. Amazon still sells my
ABM, I didn't think they were available new anymore. I bought mine
nearly 30 years ago for less than $40:
https://www.amazon.com/Welbilt-Origi...+bread+machine


At the price they are now I DOUBT MANY WOULD BITE. $268.18 + $38.85 shipping.
=====
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Old 22-10-2016, 06:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making a White Sauce

On Saturday, October 22, 2016 at 6:51:51 AM UTC-5, wrote:

Never had any problem with making white sauce but only cook the roux a
couple of minutes to cut the 'flour' taste, certainly don't want it to
colour. I have never taken it off the heat before adding the milk
but I do whisk while adding slowly so it is all incorporated well,
this is the stage where you could get some lumps.


Same as you. I've never taken the skillet off the heat and have
never seen anyone else do that.

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Old 22-10-2016, 06:48 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making a White Sauce

On Saturday, October 22, 2016 at 9:04:05 AM UTC-5, wrote:

On Sat, 22 Oct 2016 09:42:26 -0400, Dave Smith
wrote:

If you add the milk to the roux in a hot pan it tends to coagulate very
quickly and you end up with a lumpy sauce. It is not the end of the
world. You and whisk it like mad for a long time or maybe use a stick
blender to removed the lumps. It is easier to simply take it off the
heat and avoid the lumps.

Clearly, judging by other responses, this is a male thing - women are
more dextrous and can do two things at once successfully


Hahahaaaaa, yes! No lumpy gravy here with the pan left on the
heat.

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Old 22-10-2016, 06:54 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making a White Sauce

On Sat, 22 Oct 2016 11:03:58 -0300, wrote:

On Sat, 22 Oct 2016 09:42:26 -0400, Dave Smith
wrote:

On 2016-10-22 6:58 AM, Alan Holbrook wrote:
Every once in a while, when I get the feeling that my arteries are still
too flexible and my heart isn't working hard enough pumping blood, I'll
make a large skillet of sawmill gravy and pour it over biscuits for
breakfast. The recipe I follow says, as do all the other recipes I've seen
that involve making a white sauce, that once you have the roux the color
you want, you should take the pan off the heat to add the milk. I've often
wondered why that is and what would happen if you added the milk directly
to the pan containing the roux while it's still on the burner. Rather than
risk seven years' bad luck or something similar trying it, I thought I'd
ask. Can any of the RFC intelligentsia enlighten me?


If you add the milk to the roux in a hot pan it tends to coagulate very
quickly and you end up with a lumpy sauce. It is not the end of the
world. You and whisk it like mad for a long time or maybe use a stick
blender to removed the lumps. It is easier to simply take it off the
heat and avoid the lumps.

Clearly, judging by other responses, this is a male thing - women are
more dextrous and can do two things at once successfully


Yup, I've known women who could watch TV, chew gum, and get laid all
at the same time. LOL Wouldn't be so funny were it not true.
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Old 22-10-2016, 06:56 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making a White Sauce

On Sat, 22 Oct 2016 07:06:03 -0700, Taxed and Spent
wrote:

On 10/22/2016 7:03 AM, wrote:
On Sat, 22 Oct 2016 09:42:26 -0400, Dave Smith
wrote:

On 2016-10-22 6:58 AM, Alan Holbrook wrote:
Every once in a while, when I get the feeling that my arteries are still
too flexible and my heart isn't working hard enough pumping blood, I'll
make a large skillet of sawmill gravy and pour it over biscuits for
breakfast. The recipe I follow says, as do all the other recipes I've seen
that involve making a white sauce, that once you have the roux the color
you want, you should take the pan off the heat to add the milk. I've often
wondered why that is and what would happen if you added the milk directly
to the pan containing the roux while it's still on the burner. Rather than
risk seven years' bad luck or something similar trying it, I thought I'd
ask. Can any of the RFC intelligentsia enlighten me?

If you add the milk to the roux in a hot pan it tends to coagulate very
quickly and you end up with a lumpy sauce. It is not the end of the
world. You and whisk it like mad for a long time or maybe use a stick
blender to removed the lumps. It is easier to simply take it off the
heat and avoid the lumps.

Clearly, judging by other responses, this is a male thing - women are
more dextrous and can do two things at once successfully


lots of recipes are written for the least skilled.


Anyone who needs a recipe for white sauce is by default least skilled.


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