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Old 12-10-2011, 10:39 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Better at home? Better at restaurant?

Dave Smith wrote:

Are you talking about shawarma rather than Gyros?


Shawarma is meat that's cut into pieces, usually but not always slices.
Then it's servered with a sauce that usually but not always light
colored. I'm not sure if it's based on dairy/yogurt or on bean powder.

Gyros is meat that's finely sliced and stacked. When served it almost
comes out like it was a meatloaf. Kronos brand common in the US comes
in big cylinders that look a lot like meatloaf from a distance. It's
cooked upright next to a fire and sliced just before serving.

Once you're familiar with the terms they are distinct. Before learning
the terms they both tend to be on the menu at the same places so it's
not that hard to confuse them together.

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Old 12-10-2011, 10:58 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Wed, 12 Oct 2011 14:11:28 -0700, "Julie Bove"
wrote:


"sf" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 12 Oct 2011 09:29:26 -0400, Dave Smith
wrote:

After doing a little research it seems that they
are basically the name names for different things, depending on the
nationality of the restaurant.


Thanks, that makes sense to me. I see they are also called
döner kebab. They're just called gyros around here, even by the
Turks, so everyone knows what it is.


I don't think they are the same thing but I could be wrong. Doner Kebabs
are cooked in milk.

Really? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doner_kebab

--
All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt.
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Old 12-10-2011, 11:10 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Better at home? Better at restaurant?

On Wed, 12 Oct 2011 16:23:35 -0400, Dave Smith
wrote:

On 12/10/2011 2:32 PM, Lou Decruss wrote:

As for the sandwiches, I mostly just buy them premade now. He can just go
to the fridge, take one and eat it. Otherwise we get to hear a whole lot of
screaming while he waits for me to finish whatever it is I am doing to make
the sandwich. And then while I am making the sandwich because I can never
make it fast enough.


You must have very low self esteem to put up with that. Does the
asshole even thank you for being his slave?



I think that we figured out the low self esteem part when she wrote
about how her daughter was so bad in the restaurant that she was tempted
to walk out and leave her there. My kid would never have seen the inside
of a restaurant again.


My kid was bad exactly one time.

Lou
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Old 12-10-2011, 11:14 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Better at home? Better at restaurant?

On Wed, 12 Oct 2011 17:19:26 -0400, Goomba
wrote:

Lou Decruss wrote:

You must have very low self esteem to put up with that. Does the
asshole even thank you for being his slave?

Lou


He's an uncouthed pig. She's dull, whines all, lives to take on the
sick role and doesn't work. So he'll say she's dependent on him for the
roof over her head. She's written before that they don't live together
for the most part. I just can't imagine either of them finding someone
new to take them on.


Being in a dysfunctional family is one thing. I think most people
have a quirk or two but playing it out here and using RFC as group
therapy is over the top. She seems oblivious to the fact that people
call her on it. What a lunatic.

Lou
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Old 12-10-2011, 11:15 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Better at home? Better at restaurant?

On 12/10/2011 5:58 PM, sf wrote:

Thanks, that makes sense to me. I see they are also called
döner kebab. They're just called gyros around here, even by the
Turks, so everyone knows what it is.


I don't think they are the same thing but I could be wrong. Doner Kebabs
are cooked in milk.

Really? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doner_kebab




I don't see no moo juice dripping from that hunk of meat.


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Old 12-10-2011, 11:54 PM
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Default

Agreed! Gyros is one fo the few that I can only get in a restaurant, as the process of making it at home is too arduous compared to the $6.50 I'll spend for a perfect one.

Paella was a good example; but I'd hope any restaurant worth their salt that claimed to have it would use great medium grain rice that cooks best uncovered. I would be mega pssed to get long grain in a paella I just spent good $ on. never had it in a restaurant.

Mexican food is a toss up as it depends on the restaurant. The beauty of most latin American foods is the ease to make at home. A certain seafood soup I rmemeber from Ecuador couldn't even be emulated at home. Never even considered it. Just so perfect in the shack they call a restaurant with all local seafood delicacies. God, I crave for that flav once again.

Steaks and burgers are a horse a piece. Good Thai v. buffet Thai, you can really get some nice stuff out there. Korean and Chinese, too.

Polish recipes (czarnina/pierogi) I feel are better made at home, also; but the sausages are generally unreal if you find the right butcher.
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Old 13-10-2011, 01:26 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Better at home? Better at restaurant?


"sf" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 12 Oct 2011 14:11:28 -0700, "Julie Bove"
wrote:


"sf" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 12 Oct 2011 09:29:26 -0400, Dave Smith
wrote:

After doing a little research it seems that they
are basically the name names for different things, depending on the
nationality of the restaurant.

Thanks, that makes sense to me. I see they are also called
döner kebab. They're just called gyros around here, even by the
Turks, so everyone knows what it is.


I don't think they are the same thing but I could be wrong. Doner Kebabs
are cooked in milk.

Really? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doner_kebab

--
All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt.


This is one example of the recipes I had looked up.

http://www.grouprecipes.com/97811/ho...ner-kebab.html

I stand corrected. Apparently it is not *cooked* in milk but marinated in
it. But I still don't think they are the same thing.


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Old 13-10-2011, 01:37 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Wed, 12 Oct 2011 17:26:41 -0700, "Julie Bove"
wrote:


"sf" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 12 Oct 2011 14:11:28 -0700, "Julie Bove"
wrote:


"sf" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 12 Oct 2011 09:29:26 -0400, Dave Smith
wrote:

After doing a little research it seems that they
are basically the name names for different things, depending on the
nationality of the restaurant.

Thanks, that makes sense to me. I see they are also called
döner kebab. They're just called gyros around here, even by the
Turks, so everyone knows what it is.

I don't think they are the same thing but I could be wrong. Doner Kebabs
are cooked in milk.

Really? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doner_kebab

--
All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt.


This is one example of the recipes I had looked up.

http://www.grouprecipes.com/97811/ho...ner-kebab.html

I stand corrected. Apparently it is not *cooked* in milk but marinated in
it. But I still don't think they are the same thing.


I think they are very similar if not the same. She says at the top
"Doner kebab (Turkish döner kebap, literally "turning roast"), is a
nomadic dish originating from the Turkish / Arabian area. The doner
was originally prepared for ease of transport and cured for long life.
It is associated as a Turkish dish made of meat cooked on a vertical
spit and sliced off to order."

--
All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt.
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Old 13-10-2011, 03:41 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Better at home? Better at restaurant?

Julie wrote:

It freaking drives me nuts when my husband calls while I am making dinner
or just after I have made it to tell me that he won't be home for dinner.
Of course if he had to work late, I wouldn't be upset. But that's never
the case. He just decides to go somewhere else on a whim. That leaves me
with a portion of food that may or may not be eaten on another day. And
most likely not. Sometimes he does this several days in a row and then he
blames me for cooking too much food!


I wonder what his side of the story is.


As for the sandwiches, I mostly just buy them premade now. He can just go
to the fridge, take one and eat it. Otherwise we get to hear a whole lot
of screaming while he waits for me to finish whatever it is I am doing to
make the sandwich. And then while I am making the sandwich because I can
never make it fast enough.


Screaming? Did you mean REAL screaming on his part? Or was that hyperbole?

This whole story seems too one-sided to be completely true. It reminds me a
bit of the old Thanksgiving thread where a woman was complaining that her
husband never got home from hunting in time to eat her NOONTIME dinner on
Thanksgiving. God forbid that she plan for dinner to be LATER than that.

http://groups.google.com/group/rec.f...ca69678bce6162

(Start reading with the post numbered 25, the one from Shirley.)

Bob


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Old 13-10-2011, 03:44 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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sf wrote:

Please don't mention sous vide, the thought turns my stomach. I avoid
anything on a menu that admits being sous vide and sincerely hope they
aren't lying about the rest of the menu.


Uh-oh... you know that Fish Veracruz you like? How do you suppose they keep
from overcooking the fish?

Bob




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Old 13-10-2011, 04:17 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Wed, 12 Oct 2011 19:41:12 -0700, "Bob Terwilliger"
wrote:

This whole story seems too one-sided to be completely true. It reminds me a
bit of the old Thanksgiving thread where a woman was complaining that her
husband never got home from hunting in time to eat her NOONTIME dinner on
Thanksgiving. God forbid that she plan for dinner to be LATER than that.

http://groups.google.com/group/rec.f...ca69678bce6162

(Start reading with the post numbered 25, the one from Shirley.)


Some people eat earlier than later. I don't know why other than it's
their family's custom.

--
All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt.
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Old 13-10-2011, 04:19 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Wed, 12 Oct 2011 19:44:09 -0700, "Bob Terwilliger"
wrote:

sf wrote:

Please don't mention sous vide, the thought turns my stomach. I avoid
anything on a menu that admits being sous vide and sincerely hope they
aren't lying about the rest of the menu.


Uh-oh... you know that Fish Veracruz you like? How do you suppose they keep
from overcooking the fish?

Not sous vide.

--
All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt.
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Old 13-10-2011, 05:04 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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In article om,
"Bob Terwilliger" wrote:

Julie wrote:

It freaking drives me nuts when my husband calls while I am making dinner
or just after I have made it to tell me that he won't be home for dinner.
Of course if he had to work late, I wouldn't be upset. But that's never
the case. He just decides to go somewhere else on a whim. That leaves me
with a portion of food that may or may not be eaten on another day. And
most likely not. Sometimes he does this several days in a row and then he
blames me for cooking too much food!


I wonder what his side of the story is.


I was wondering something similar when I read this earlier today. When
I was a little kid, my mother used to read some women's magazine. In
the front, there was a regular feature. I don't remember the details,
but I think it was a husband and wife telling their stories about their
marriage. The stories were completely different, but about the same
things. I didn't understand how two people could have such radically
different views about the same exact things. Later on I grew up.

:-)

--
Dan Abel
Petaluma, California USA

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Old 13-10-2011, 05:34 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Oct 12, 9:04*pm, Dan Abel wrote:
In article om,
*"Bob Terwilliger" wrote:

Julie wrote:


It freaking drives me nuts when my husband calls while I am making dinner
or just after I have made it to tell me that he won't be home for dinner.
Of course if he had to work late, I wouldn't be upset. *But that's never
the case. *He just decides to go somewhere else on a whim. *That leaves me
with a portion of food that may or may not be eaten on another day. *And
most likely not. *Sometimes he does this several days in a row and then he
blames me for cooking too much food!


I wonder what his side of the story is.


I was wondering something similar when I read this earlier today. *When
I was a little kid, my mother used to read some women's magazine. *In
the front, there was a regular feature. *I don't remember the details,
but I think it was a husband and wife telling their stories about their
marriage. *The stories were completely different, but about the same
things. *I didn't understand how two people could have such radically
different views about the same exact things. *Later on I grew up.

:-)

--
Dan Abel
Petaluma, California USA


Well, you grew up- apparently these 2 haven't figured it out yet. I do
find it curious that Julie hasn't defended herself- maybe she is
allergic/doesn't like to.
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Old 13-10-2011, 06:05 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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"Ranee at Arabian Knits" wrote in message
...
In article ,
sf wrote:

Some people eat earlier than later. I don't know why other than it's
their family's custom.


We don't eat Thanksgiving dinner for breakfast. We have a brunch and
then eat the big meal at dinner time.


We eat it at a weird time and I'm not really sure why. Usually around 2:00.
Too late for lunch and too early for dinner.




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