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Old 06-10-2010, 02:43 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Roasted Cauliflower

"Charlotte L. Blackmer" wrote in message
...
In article , Cheri
wrote:
"Christine Dabney" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 05 Oct 2010 08:19:12 -0400, Brooklyn1 Gravesend1 wrote:

Sliced as you describe the cauliflower will fall apart, and
cauliflower does not caramelize, over cooked it will burn.

Guess you have never tried it this way.

Cauliflower most certainly will caramelize...as I and many, many
others will attest to... It doesn't become overcooked and burned,
unless you let it go that far, but before that it certainly does
caramelize. And yes, it will fall apart if you put it into very tiny
florets. If it is sliced or in larger florets, it stays in those
pieces.


Yep.

I like cutting largeish florets in pieces and I make sure the cut side is
down on the sheet for EXTRA delicious brown edges.

I don't add sugar. I drizzle a little bit of olive oil, sea salt, and the
juice of one lemon before it goes into the oven.

It will carbonize if you leave it in the oven too long.


That's the term for burning? Sounds right to me. I've never carbonized
roasted cauliflower. I also like it with slivers of garlic roasted along
with it. I love the taste of roasted garlic when bitten into. As long as
it isn't *carbonized*.




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Old 06-10-2010, 03:32 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Roasted Cauliflower

On Tue, 5 Oct 2010 21:43:19 -0400, "Cheryl"
wrote:

"Charlotte L. Blackmer" wrote in message
...
In article , Cheri
wrote:
"Christine Dabney" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 05 Oct 2010 08:19:12 -0400, Brooklyn1 Gravesend1 wrote:

Sliced as you describe the cauliflower will fall apart, and
cauliflower does not caramelize, over cooked it will burn.

Guess you have never tried it this way.

Cauliflower most certainly will caramelize...as I and many, many
others will attest to... It doesn't become overcooked and burned,
unless you let it go that far, but before that it certainly does
caramelize. And yes, it will fall apart if you put it into very tiny
florets. If it is sliced or in larger florets, it stays in those
pieces.


Yep.

I like cutting largeish florets in pieces and I make sure the cut side is
down on the sheet for EXTRA delicious brown edges.

I don't add sugar. I drizzle a little bit of olive oil, sea salt, and the
juice of one lemon before it goes into the oven.

It will carbonize if you leave it in the oven too long.


That's the term for burning? Sounds right to me. I've never carbonized
roasted cauliflower. I also like it with slivers of garlic roasted along
with it. I love the taste of roasted garlic when bitten into. As long as
it isn't *carbonized*.


Garlic will caramelize, cauliflower will not. If brushed with butter
(or any oil) it will brown from frying but that's not caramelized.

Did ya know that pickle relish contains mostly cauliflower.
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Old 06-10-2010, 03:43 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Roasted Cauliflower

In article ,
Cheryl wrote:
"Charlotte L. Blackmer" wrote in message
...
In article , Cheri
wrote:
"Christine Dabney" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 05 Oct 2010 08:19:12 -0400, Brooklyn1 Gravesend1 wrote:

Sliced as you describe the cauliflower will fall apart, and
cauliflower does not caramelize, over cooked it will burn.

Guess you have never tried it this way.

Cauliflower most certainly will caramelize...as I and many, many
others will attest to... It doesn't become overcooked and burned,
unless you let it go that far, but before that it certainly does
caramelize. And yes, it will fall apart if you put it into very tiny
florets. If it is sliced or in larger florets, it stays in those
pieces.


Yep.

I like cutting largeish florets in pieces and I make sure the cut side is
down on the sheet for EXTRA delicious brown edges.

I don't add sugar. I drizzle a little bit of olive oil, sea salt, and the
juice of one lemon before it goes into the oven.

It will carbonize if you leave it in the oven too long.


That's the term for burning? Sounds right to me. I've never carbonized
roasted cauliflower. I also like it with slivers of garlic roasted along
with it. I love the taste of roasted garlic when bitten into. As long as
it isn't *carbonized*.


That is a fancy-dan way to describe burning, yes. I was playing off
"caramelize".

Charlotte
--
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Old 06-10-2010, 05:12 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Roasted Cauliflower

On Tue, 05 Oct 2010 19:39:23 -0400, Brooklyn1 Gravesend1 wrote:

On Tue, 05 Oct 2010 13:09:57 -0700, sf wrote:

On Tue, 05 Oct 2010 13:56:34 -0400, Brooklyn1 Gravesend1 wrote:

You don't know what caramelizing means... cauliflower does not contain
sugar enough to caramelize... you have a better chance to caramelize a
head of romaine. I don't believe you ever roasted cauliflower, never
occured to you until this thread.


It browns and that's good enough for me.


Ahahaha . . . . DUMB SHIT IS BROWN TOO, AND YOU'RE NOT SWEET.


Back away from the vodka slowly.

--

Never trust a dog to watch your food.
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Old 06-10-2010, 05:18 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Roasted Cauliflower

On Tue, 5 Oct 2010 18:35:08 -0400, "Cheryl"
wrote:

Green beans are good, too.


You're absolutely right. Green beans are good when oven roasted too.
I just bought some sugar snap peas, maybe I should try roasting them.


--

Never trust a dog to watch your food.
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Old 06-10-2010, 09:00 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Roasted Cauliflower

On Wed, 6 Oct 2010 01:27:43 -0400, "jmcquown"
wrote:

I do still prefer whole roasted cauliflower as opposed to the florets, but
hey, whatever the OP wants to cook it is okay with me.


I've never considered roasting it whole. How long, ballpark it, does
that take you?

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Never trust a dog to watch your food.
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Old 06-10-2010, 04:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Roasted Cauliflower

In article
,
Lyndon Watson wrote:

On Oct 6, 2:06*am, Cindy Hamilton wrote:


green vegetables since I first tasted them as a child. My mother used
to just boil cauliflower and serve it with a white sauce (none of us
like cheese in cooked dishes); I find cauliflower and broccoli to be
ideal in frittatas or just dipped in batter and fried, or an
ingredient of any savoury dish that needs some body in it. Never
tried baking it, though, so that's on the 'must try' list. . . .

LW


waves to Lyndon -- a voice not heard in a long time
Interesting idea about the frittata; I'll have to give it a try. Mom
made a cauliflower soup, too.

--
Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of St. Pectina of Jella
"Always in a jam, never in a stew; sometimes in a pickle."
A few pics from the Fair are he
http://gallery.me.com/barbschaller#100254
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Old 06-10-2010, 04:09 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Roasted Cauliflower

In article ,
Christine Dabney wrote:

On Tue, 05 Oct 2010 13:56:34 -0400, Brooklyn1 Gravesend1 wrote:


You don't know what caramelizing means... cauliflower does not contain
sugar enough to caramelize... you have a better chance to caramelize a
head of romaine. I don't believe you ever roasted cauliflower, never
occured to you until this thread.


Yep, I was right. You have never tried it, or you wouldn't be so sure
it doesn't caramelize.....

Try it.....it might surprise you.

Christine


What's the difference between something simply browning and something
"caramelizing"? Seems like everyone bows to "caramelized." shrugs

--
Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of St. Pectina of Jella
"Always in a jam, never in a stew; sometimes in a pickle."
A few pics from the Fair are he
http://gallery.me.com/barbschaller#100254


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Old 06-10-2010, 04:10 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Roasted Cauliflower

In article ,
"Cheryl" wrote:

"Charlotte L. Blackmer" wrote in message
It will carbonize if you leave it in the oven too long.


That's the term for burning? Sounds right to me.


LOL! Like "browned" is the low-class term for "caramelize." eyes
roll.

--
Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of St. Pectina of Jella
"Always in a jam, never in a stew; sometimes in a pickle."
A few pics from the Fair are he
http://gallery.me.com/barbschaller#100254
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Old 06-10-2010, 04:12 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Roasted Cauliflower

In article ,
Brooklyn1 Gravesend1 wrote:

Did ya know that pickle relish contains mostly cauliflower.


Your eyes are getting browner, Sheldon.

--
Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of St. Pectina of Jella
"Always in a jam, never in a stew; sometimes in a pickle."
A few pics from the Fair are he
http://gallery.me.com/barbschaller#100254
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Old 06-10-2010, 04:14 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Roasted Cauliflower

In article ,
"Ophelia" wrote:
I haven't tried it like that although I always steam it. I usually dress it
with plenty of good butter.
--


I'm with you, O. Some butter and a little s&p do it for me. Better
still, raw.

White sauce and vegetables were when Mom fixed creamed peas and carrots
for pouring over toast or mashed potatoes on meatless Fridays. She
never did cheese sauces on veggies, either. And hollandaise was
absolutely out of her realm. Alex rest her weary soul.

--
Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of St. Pectina of Jella
"Always in a jam, never in a stew; sometimes in a pickle."
A few pics from the Fair are he
http://gallery.me.com/barbschaller#100254
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Old 06-10-2010, 04:28 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Roasted Cauliflower

Melba's wrote on Wed, 06 Oct 2010 10:06:44 -0500:

On Oct 6, 2:06 am, Cindy Hamilton
wrote:


green vegetables since I first tasted them as a child. My
mother used to just boil cauliflower and serve it with a
white sauce (none of us like cheese in cooked dishes); I find
cauliflower and broccoli to be ideal in frittatas or just
dipped in batter and fried, or an ingredient of any savoury
dish that needs some body in it. Never tried baking it,
though, so that's on the 'must try' list. . . .

LW


waves to Lyndon -- a voice not heard in a long time
Interesting idea about the frittata; I'll have to give it a
try. Mom made a cauliflower soup, too.


You can also make mashed cauliflower as a variant or substitute for
mashed potatoes. It's not bad but I prefer potatoes :-)

--

James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland

Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not



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