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Old 22-01-2009, 11:33 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What is a substitute for kitchen twine?

Hi all,

I am making some beef Braciole (Italian beef rolls) for a dinner party
this weekend. I have to tie the stuffed rolls with kitchen twine
before I put them in the oven.

Now, it's been a while since I bought kitchen twine and as luck would
have it, I'm out. I have gone to 2 high-end groceries and can't find
the stuff!

Not wanting to torment myself further, I'm wondering if something else
would work in its place. I was thinking of (heavy duty) thread.
That's all I have besides sisal/twine - which I'm afraid would shed
into the meat/sauce!

What do you guys think?

Any help is much appreciated,
Kris

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Old 22-01-2009, 11:52 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What is a substitute for kitchen twine?

On Thu, 22 Jan 2009 15:33:25 -0800 (PST), Kris
wrote:

I have to tie the stuffed rolls with kitchen twine
before I put them in the oven.


Go to an ACE hardware and buy 100% cotton twine. Probably 100% less
than buying at Williams Sonoma or your local "high end" grocery
supplier.



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Old 23-01-2009, 12:10 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What is a substitute for kitchen twine?

On Jan 22, 6:52*pm, Mr. Bill wrote:
On Thu, 22 Jan 2009 15:33:25 -0800 (PST), Kris
wrote:

I have to tie the stuffed rolls with kitchen twine
before I put them in the oven.


Go to an ACE hardware and buy 100% cotton twine. * *Probably 100% less
than buying at Williams Sonoma or your local "high end" grocery
supplier. *


Excellent idea! There's an Ace nearby, too.

BTW, I was checking "high end" stores because I figured they were more
likely to carry it.

So the string is a bad idea? I was a bit worried it would "cut" into
the meat a little.

Thank you,
Kris

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Old 23-01-2009, 12:15 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What is a substitute for kitchen twine?

On 2009-01-22, Kris wrote:

Not wanting to torment myself further, I'm wondering if something else
would work in its place. I was thinking of (heavy duty) thread.


Unwaxed dental floss?

nb
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Old 23-01-2009, 12:37 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What is a substitute for kitchen twine?


"Kris" wrote in message
...
Hi all,

I am making some beef Braciole (Italian beef rolls) for a dinner party
this weekend. I have to tie the stuffed rolls with kitchen twine
before I put them in the oven.

Now, it's been a while since I bought kitchen twine and as luck would
have it, I'm out. I have gone to 2 high-end groceries and can't find
the stuff!

Not wanting to torment myself further, I'm wondering if something else
would work in its place. I was thinking of (heavy duty) thread.
That's all I have besides sisal/twine - which I'm afraid would shed
into the meat/sauce!

What do you guys think?

Any help is much appreciated,
Kris


Go to a hardware store and get some cotton twine or ask the butcher at your
high end store meat department.

Dimitri



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Old 23-01-2009, 01:10 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What is a substitute for kitchen twine?



Kris wrote:

Hi all,

I am making some beef Braciole (Italian beef rolls) for a dinner party
this weekend. I have to tie the stuffed rolls with kitchen twine
before I put them in the oven.

Now, it's been a while since I bought kitchen twine and as luck would
have it, I'm out. I have gone to 2 high-end groceries and can't find
the stuff!

Not wanting to torment myself further, I'm wondering if something else
would work in its place. I was thinking of (heavy duty) thread.
That's all I have besides sisal/twine - which I'm afraid would shed
into the meat/sauce!

What do you guys think?



Plain cotton string. Or else toothpicks.
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Old 23-01-2009, 01:24 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What is a substitute for kitchen twine?

On Jan 22, 6:33�pm, Kris wrote:
Hi all,

I am making some beef Braciole (Italian beef rolls) for a dinner party
this weekend. �I have to tie the stuffed rolls with kitchen twine
before I put them in the oven.

Now, it's been a while since I bought kitchen twine and as luck would
have it, I'm out. �I have gone to 2 high-end groceries and can't find
the stuff!

Not wanting to torment myself further, I'm wondering if something else
would work in its place. I was thinking of (heavy duty) thread.
That's all I have besides sisal/twine - which I'm afraid would shed
into the meat/sauce!

What do you guys think?

Any help is much appreciated,
Kris


I have three kinds of kitchen twine; French butcher twine made of
linen (Williams-Sonoma), American butcher twine made of cotton
(alliedkenco.com), and heavy cotton crochet thread:
http://store.knitting-warehouse.com/...et-cotton.html

In an emergency any white string or heavyweight thread will work
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Old 23-01-2009, 01:46 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What is a substitute for kitchen twine?

Kris wrote:

Hi all,

I am making some beef Braciole (Italian beef rolls) for a dinner party
this weekend. I have to tie the stuffed rolls with kitchen twine
before I put them in the oven.

Now, it's been a while since I bought kitchen twine and as luck would
have it, I'm out. I have gone to 2 high-end groceries and can't find
the stuff!

Not wanting to torment myself further, I'm wondering if something else
would work in its place. I was thinking of (heavy duty) thread.
That's all I have besides sisal/twine - which I'm afraid would shed
into the meat/sauce!


Linen's and Things and/or Bed Bath and Beyond (whichever one is
still open) sells re-usable silicone rubber bands. I saw them there
again last week. You can also find them at drug stores sold as hair
bands.

-sw

-sw

-sw
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Old 23-01-2009, 02:26 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What is a substitute for kitchen twine?

On Thu, 22 Jan 2009 15:33:25 -0800 (PST), Kris
wrote:


Not wanting to torment myself further, I'm wondering if something else
would work in its place. I was thinking of (heavy duty) thread.
That's all I have besides sisal/twine - which I'm afraid would shed
into the meat/sauce!

What do you guys think?


Check out your local kitchen supply house. Maybe Williams-
Sonoma, Kitchen Collection, etc. Look for silicone ties. They
are a little like those plastic handcuffs, but made of food-
grade silicone. They can be wrapped around your braciole,
do not taint the food, and can be unsnapped before
serving. Dishwasher safe and reusable.

Look here...

http://marketplace.hgtv.com/Product....7EB1C&From=iFP

HTH,


Alex
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Old 23-01-2009, 02:26 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What is a substitute for kitchen twine?

On Jan 22, 6:33*pm, Kris wrote:
Hi all,

I am making some beef Braciole (Italian beef rolls) for a dinner party
this weekend. *I have to tie the stuffed rolls with kitchen twine
before I put them in the oven.

Now, it's been a while since I bought kitchen twine and as luck would
have it, I'm out. *I have gone to 2 high-end groceries and can't find
the stuff!

Not wanting to torment myself further, I'm wondering if something else
would work in its place. I was thinking of (heavy duty) thread.
That's all I have besides sisal/twine - which I'm afraid would shed
into the meat/sauce!


I happened to see an Alton Brown ("Good Eats") episode the other day
where he dealt with the string/twine/core issue. He ended up
recommending linen twine, but I've used cotton without issues. Dollar
store cotton is pretty weak, but can be doubled up. Avoid sisle/hemp
or waxed twines for food use.


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Old 23-01-2009, 03:32 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
k k is offline
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Default What is a substitute for kitchen twine?


"Kris" wrote in message
...
Hi all,

I am making some beef Braciole (Italian beef rolls) for a dinner party
this weekend. I have to tie the stuffed rolls with kitchen twine
before I put them in the oven.

Now, it's been a while since I bought kitchen twine and as luck would
have it, I'm out. I have gone to 2 high-end groceries and can't find
the stuff!

Not wanting to torment myself further, I'm wondering if something else
would work in its place. I was thinking of (heavy duty) thread.
That's all I have besides sisal/twine - which I'm afraid would shed
into the meat/sauce!

What do you guys think?

Any help is much appreciated,
Kris


Are you looking in the right place? In the supermarket, the butcher's twine
is often right in the meat case, at least around here (Northeast US). I
don't think it's any different than the regular kitchen twine we get at
Walmart or K-mart.

Good luck with the brasciole. We had it a few weeks ago and it was
wonderful.

k.


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Old 23-01-2009, 04:09 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What is a substitute for kitchen twine?

Kris wrote:
Hi all,

I am making some beef Braciole (Italian beef rolls) for a dinner party
this weekend. I have to tie the stuffed rolls with kitchen twine
before I put them in the oven.

Now, it's been a while since I bought kitchen twine and as luck would
have it, I'm out. I have gone to 2 high-end groceries and can't find
the stuff!

Not wanting to torment myself further, I'm wondering if something else
would work in its place. I was thinking of (heavy duty) thread.
That's all I have besides sisal/twine - which I'm afraid would shed
into the meat/sauce!

What do you guys think?

Any help is much appreciated,
Kris



I'd use those small metal skewers often used to truss turkeys.

gloria p
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Old 23-01-2009, 08:04 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What is a substitute for kitchen twine?


"Kris" wrote in message
...
On Jan 22, 6:52 pm, Mr. Bill wrote:
On Thu, 22 Jan 2009 15:33:25 -0800 (PST), Kris
wrote:

I have to tie the stuffed rolls with kitchen twine
before I put them in the oven.


Go to an ACE hardware and buy 100% cotton twine. Probably 100% less
than buying at Williams Sonoma or your local "high end" grocery
supplier.


Excellent idea! There's an Ace nearby, too.

BTW, I was checking "high end" stores because I figured they were more
likely to carry it.

So the string is a bad idea? I was a bit worried it would "cut" into
the meat a little.

Thank you,
Kris


Cotton twine is absolutely the best to use! Our local hardware has old
fashioned cotton twine, as, I'm sure, does yours. I have another secret I
haven't seen anywhere. To make bouquet garni, I use medical 4X4 bandages. I
buy them in bulk at a medical supply house. One package of several hundred
lasts a long long time. Since they're small, though with the right degree of
porosity, you waste much less of your stock than with cheesecloth. I use
this for making stock, and for any braised dish. Inside goes the dried or
fresh herbs, the celery tops, the parsley, and anything else you're using.

Theron






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Old 23-01-2009, 07:11 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What is a substitute for kitchen twine?

In article
,
Kris wrote:

Hi all,

I am making some beef Braciole (Italian beef rolls) for a dinner party
this weekend. I have to tie the stuffed rolls with kitchen twine
before I put them in the oven.

Now, it's been a while since I bought kitchen twine and as luck would
have it, I'm out. I have gone to 2 high-end groceries and can't find
the stuff!

Not wanting to torment myself further, I'm wondering if something else
would work in its place. I was thinking of (heavy duty) thread.
That's all I have besides sisal/twine - which I'm afraid would shed
into the meat/sauce!

What do you guys think?

Any help is much appreciated,
Kris


100% cotton twine.
--
Peace! Om

"Any ship can be a minesweeper. Once." -- Anonymous
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Old 23-01-2009, 07:50 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What is a substitute for kitchen twine?

On Jan 23, 3:04*am, "Theron" wrote:
"Kris" wrote in message

...
On Jan 22, 6:52 pm, Mr. Bill wrote:

On Thu, 22 Jan 2009 15:33:25 -0800 (PST), Kris
wrote:


I have to tie the stuffed rolls with kitchen twine
before I put them in the oven.


Go to an ACE hardware and buy 100% cotton twine. Probably 100% less
than buying at Williams Sonoma or your local "high end" grocery
supplier.


Excellent idea! There's an Ace nearby, too.

BTW, I was checking "high end" stores because I figured they were more
likely to carry it.

So the string is a bad idea? I was a bit worried it would "cut" into
the meat a little.

Thank you,
Kris

Cotton twine is absolutely the best to use! Our local hardware has old
fashioned cotton twine, as, I'm sure, does yours. *I have another secret I
haven't seen anywhere. To make bouquet garni, I use medical 4X4 bandages. *I
buy them in bulk at a medical supply house. One package of several hundred
lasts a long long time. Since they're small, though with the right degree of
porosity, you waste much less of your stock than with cheesecloth. I use
this for making stock, and for any braised dish. Inside goes the dried or
fresh herbs, the celery tops, the parsley, and anything else you're using..

Theron


Well, I can see that this newsgroup is fll of resourceful cooks! I
went to my Ace and bought cotton twine. Ironically enough, they also
had kitchen twine (so much for my "high end" store theory!) - the same
price for about 1/4th of the twine!

I also love the idea of medical gauze for garnis - I will remember
that one when my current cheesecloth runs out!

Thanks to all! I now can enjoy making my braciole without stress!
(Giada's recipe - really delicious by all acoounts so far!)

Have a great weekend,
Kris


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