General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

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Old 12-06-2008, 07:04 PM posted to rec.food.preserving,rec.food.cooking
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Default preserving vegetables for the short term

When I bring vegetables/fruit home from the supermarket, I never know
which should be stored in the fridge or outside, which should be
stored in the crisper drawer or which shouldnt be sealed in a plastic
bag. I am looking for the best ways to store vegetables for the short
term (not long term preservation) I have been searching for a good
book on this subject or even better, a chart that could be mounted on
the refrigerator. Until someone recommends a book/chart, perhaps some
of you have some advice for a few of the vegetables/fruit I buy
regularly.

potatos
onion
scallions
garlic
carrots
celery

banananas
lemon
oranges
strawberries

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Old 12-06-2008, 07:32 PM posted to rec.food.preserving,rec.food.cooking
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Default preserving vegetables for the short term

On Jun 12, 2:04*pm, wrote:
When I bring vegetables/fruit home from the supermarket, I never know
which should be stored in the fridge or outside, which should be
stored in the crisper drawer or which shouldnt be sealed in a plastic
bag. I am looking for the best ways to store vegetables for the short
term (not long term preservation) *I have been searching for a good
book on this subject or even better, a chart that could be mounted on
the refrigerator. Until someone recommends a book/chart, perhaps some
of you have some advice for a few of the vegetables/fruit I buy
regularly.


The USDA or your county agricultural extension service might have
some information.

The rule of thumb is to store them the same way that the grocer stored
them.
The grocer does not want to waste money by throwing away vegetables.

However, the grocer has technology that you do not. I'm sure you
don't
want to install a sprinkler system to fluff up your lettuce.

In general, produce doesn't like to have water (including
condensation)
against its skin. It will rot quicker that way.

potatos
onion
garlic


Root vegetables should be stored in a cool, dry place. Not the
refrigerator. A cupboard is better than the fridge. Air circulation
around the vegetables prevents mold and sprouting. Store potatoes
separately from onions and garlic.

scallions


I usually wrap them in a paper towel and put that inside of a plastic
bag. Then into the refrigerator.

carrots


If they came in a plastic bag, keep them in it. Otherwise, I like to
remove
the tops, wash them, wrap them in a paper towel, plastic bag, fridge.

celery


In the packaging that it came in.

banananas


Outside of the refrigerator. However, if you don't like them to get
overripe,
and don't want to bake a lot of banana bread, when they get to the
stage
that you like them, put them in the fridge. The skins will turn
black, but
the bananas won't ripen further. Too much time in the fridge and they
will
get soft, so don't buy a ton.

lemon
oranges


Lemons and oranges can be kept outside the fridge. Or you can put
them
in the fridge.

strawberries


Strawberries are difficult. Under the best circumstances they won't
last
very long. Handle them as little as possible, make sure they don't
get water trapped between them and their container. Frankly, I
wash and hull mine, soak them briefly in water acidulated with lemon
juice, put them into a plastic bowl with a paper towel at the bottom
and
eat them quickly.

Cindy Hamilton

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Old 12-06-2008, 08:18 PM posted to rec.food.preserving,rec.food.cooking
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Default preserving vegetables for the short term

Cindy wrote on Thu, 12 Jun 2008 11:32:21 -0700 (PDT):

On Jun 12, 2:04 pm, wrote:
When I bring vegetables/fruit home from the supermarket, I
never know which should be stored in the fridge or outside,
which should be stored in the crisper drawer or which
shouldnt be sealed in a plastic bag. I am looking for the
best ways to store vegetables for the short term (not long
term preservation) I have been searching for a good book on
this subject or even better, a chart that could be mounted on
the refrigerator. Until someone recommends a book/chart,
perhaps some of you have some advice for a few of the
vegetables/fruit I buy regularly.


The USDA or your county agricultural extension service might
have some information.


The rule of thumb is to store them the same way that the
grocer stored them.
The grocer does not want to waste money by throwing away
vegetables.


Those are some pretty good tips that I won't repeat but I'd add that
celery keeps very well in a plastic bag in a crisper. It may blanch but
I prefer white to green anyway. The leaves will turn brown long before
the stalks are unappetizing even if a small amount of cut end needs
trimming. In my experience, parsley and cilantro keep best in plastic
bags in the fridge if dry rather than damp even if stores tend to
sprinkle them with water.
--

James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland

E-mail, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not

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Old 12-06-2008, 08:28 PM posted to rec.food.preserving,rec.food.cooking
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Default preserving vegetables for the short term

Cindy Hamilton wrote:

Root vegetables should be stored in a cool, dry place. Not the
refrigerator. A cupboard is better than the fridge. Air circulation
around the vegetables prevents mold and sprouting. Store potatoes
separately from onions and garlic.


Potatoes should be stored in total darkness,
to inhibit greening and sprouting.
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Old 12-06-2008, 08:48 PM posted to rec.food.preserving,rec.food.cooking
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Default preserving vegetables for the short term

James Silverton wrote:

Those are some pretty good tips that I won't repeat but I'd add that
celery keeps very well in a plastic bag in a crisper. It may blanch but
I prefer white to green anyway. The leaves will turn brown long before
the stalks are unappetizing even if a small amount of cut end needs
trimming. In my experience, parsley and cilantro keep best in plastic
bags in the fridge if dry rather than damp even if stores tend to
sprinkle them with water.


Cilantro keeps longer if the stems sit in a glass or jar
of water in the fridge. Broccoli also benefits from
having the stem in water. I cut off the last inch or so
of the stem before putting it in water. Within a few
hours, the broccoli becomes very crisp.


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Old 12-06-2008, 10:50 PM posted to rec.food.preserving,rec.food.cooking
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Default preserving vegetables for the short term

Strawberries are difficult. *Under the best circumstances they won't
last
very long. *Handle them as little as possible, make sure they don't
get water trapped between them and their container. *Frankly, I
wash and hull mine, soak them briefly in water acidulated with lemon
juice, put them into a plastic bowl with a paper towel at the bottom
and
eat them quickly.

Cindy Hamilton


Strawberries last longest if they are not washed until right before
using, and then dried as much as possible. Raspberries shouldn't be
washed at all- just dump them out of their container onto a paper
towel so any crawly things can just crawl away! I know raspberries
weren't asked about, but thought someone might find that info handy as
tis the season (somewhere).
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Old 13-06-2008, 12:47 AM posted to rec.food.preserving,rec.food.cooking
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Default preserving vegetables for the short term

James Silverton wrote:

Those are some pretty good tips that I won't repeat but I'd add that
celery keeps very well in a plastic bag in a crisper. It may blanch
but I prefer white to green anyway. The leaves will turn brown long
before the stalks are unappetizing even if a small amount of cut end
needs trimming. In my experience, parsley and cilantro keep best in
plastic bags in the fridge if dry rather than damp even if stores
tend to sprinkle them with water.


The most recent issue of Cook's Illustrated covered this subject
and this is the one tip I found interesting, even though I think I've
heard it before. Storing tomatoes stem end down does cause
them to last longer. It reduces air and moisture transfering
through the scar.

nancy
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Old 13-06-2008, 02:25 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default preserving vegetables for the short term

When I lived in my RV, the absorption refrigerator was famous for
spoiling produce. I learned to keep celery tightly wrapped in aluminum
foil. It kept 3 times longer that way.

Now that I have a regular fridge in a regular (non-wheeled) house, I
still keep the celery in foil.

--
Janet Wilder
Bad spelling. Bad punctuation
Good Friends. Good Life
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Old 13-06-2008, 05:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default preserving vegetables for the short term

On Thu, 12 Jun 2008 20:25:12 -0500, Janet Wilder
wrote:

When I lived in my RV, the absorption refrigerator was famous for
spoiling produce. I learned to keep celery tightly wrapped in aluminum
foil. It kept 3 times longer that way.

Now that I have a regular fridge in a regular (non-wheeled) house, I
still keep the celery in foil.


tightly wrapped in foil is indeed the way to go for celery. i might
then stick it back in the bag it came in, but i don't know if this
makes a difference or not.

your pal,
blake


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