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Old 07-03-2008, 01:42 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.equipment
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Default New breadmaker, different procedure.

I just got a new breadmaker (Panasonic) and noticed two pecularities
in the instructions (compared with the old one's).


(1a) The old instructions said (when using the delay timer) to put the
liquids, salt and sugar in, then the flour, and finally the yeast
on top, to keep the yeast separate until the mixing starts.

(1b) The new ones say to put the yeast in the bottom, cover it with
the flour, and then put everything else, including the liquids,
on top, to keep the yeast separate until the mixing starts.

To me, (a) seems more intuitively correct, but I've been
following (b) with the new one for several batches and had good
results. Any opinions?


(2) The instructions for the new one specifically say to wash the
inside of the pan only, and not to immerse it, so obviously it
can't go in the dishwasher. (The old one went in the dishwasher
every time; to be fair, I replaced the pan twice in four years
because the spindle started getting loose, but I don't think the
dishwasher was the cause and I'm sure I read the instructions
before I started doing it.)

Is this a common restriction on new breadmakers?


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Old 07-03-2008, 02:48 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default New breadmaker, different procedure.

Adam Funk wrote:
I just got a new breadmaker (Panasonic) and noticed two pecularities
in the instructions (compared with the old one's).


(1a) The old instructions said (when using the delay timer) to put the
liquids, salt and sugar in, then the flour, and finally the yeast
on top, to keep the yeast separate until the mixing starts.

(1b) The new ones say to put the yeast in the bottom, cover it with
the flour, and then put everything else, including the liquids,
on top, to keep the yeast separate until the mixing starts.

To me, (a) seems more intuitively correct, but I've been
following (b) with the new one for several batches and had good
results. Any opinions?


(2) The instructions for the new one specifically say to wash the
inside of the pan only, and not to immerse it, so obviously it
can't go in the dishwasher. (The old one went in the dishwasher
every time; to be fair, I replaced the pan twice in four years
because the spindle started getting loose, but I don't think the
dishwasher was the cause and I'm sure I read the instructions
before I started doing it.)

Is this a common restriction on new breadmakers?


I'm on my third breadmaker and all of them had the same restriction,
wash pan by hand, inside only, not to go in the dishwasher. I took a pan
on one of the old ones apart to see how it worked. The spindle is
gasketed where it goes through the pan wall at the bottom and is lightly
oiled at the factory. I assume from this that dishwasher use in cleaning
the pan destroys the gasket, the spindle gets wobbly, there is leakage
at the spindle and it gets worse from there.

I can't comment on the method of Delay baking as I've never used it.
I've been a House Husband since December 1991 and don't need no stinking
delay. VBG

George
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Old 07-03-2008, 03:01 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default New breadmaker, different procedure.

George Shirley wrote:
Adam Funk wrote:
I just got a new breadmaker (Panasonic) and noticed two pecularities
in the instructions (compared with the old one's).


(1a) The old instructions said (when using the delay timer) to put
the liquids, salt and sugar in, then the flour, and finally the
yeast on top, to keep the yeast separate until the mixing
starts. (1b) The new ones say to put the yeast in the bottom, cover it
with
the flour, and then put everything else, including the liquids,
on top, to keep the yeast separate until the mixing starts.

To me, (a) seems more intuitively correct, but I've been
following (b) with the new one for several batches and had good
results. Any opinions?


(2) The instructions for the new one specifically say to wash the
inside of the pan only, and not to immerse it, so obviously it
can't go in the dishwasher. (The old one went in the dishwasher
every time; to be fair, I replaced the pan twice in four years
because the spindle started getting loose, but I don't think the
dishwasher was the cause and I'm sure I read the instructions
before I started doing it.)

Is this a common restriction on new breadmakers?


I'm on my third breadmaker and all of them had the same restriction,
wash pan by hand, inside only, not to go in the dishwasher. I took a
pan on one of the old ones apart to see how it worked. The spindle is
gasketed where it goes through the pan wall at the bottom and is
lightly oiled at the factory. I assume from this that dishwasher use
in cleaning the pan destroys the gasket, the spindle gets wobbly,
there is leakage at the spindle and it gets worse from there.

I can't comment on the method of Delay baking as I've never used it.
I've been a House Husband since December 1991 and don't need no
stinking delay. VBG


LOL


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Old 07-03-2008, 04:10 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.equipment
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Default New breadmaker, different procedure.


"Adam Funk" wrote in message
...
I just got a new breadmaker (Panasonic) and noticed two pecularities
in the instructions (compared with the old one's).


(1a) The old instructions said (when using the delay timer) to put the
liquids, salt and sugar in, then the flour, and finally the yeast
on top, to keep the yeast separate until the mixing starts.

(1b) The new ones say to put the yeast in the bottom, cover it with
the flour, and then put everything else, including the liquids,
on top, to keep the yeast separate until the mixing starts.

To me, (a) seems more intuitively correct, but I've been
following (b) with the new one for several batches and had good
results. Any opinions?


(2) The instructions for the new one specifically say to wash the
inside of the pan only, and not to immerse it, so obviously it
can't go in the dishwasher. (The old one went in the dishwasher
every time; to be fair, I replaced the pan twice in four years
because the spindle started getting loose, but I don't think the
dishwasher was the cause and I'm sure I read the instructions
before I started doing it.)

Is this a common restriction on new breadmakers?


I bought mine a couple of years ago and it says to do ( b). It doesn't seem
to work very well, but then I am using gluten free ingredients. I always
wash the pan by hand.


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Old 07-03-2008, 06:30 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.equipment
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Default New breadmaker, different procedure.

In article ,
Adam Funk wrote:

I just got a new breadmaker (Panasonic) and noticed two pecularities
in the instructions (compared with the old one's).


(1a) The old instructions said (when using the delay timer) to put the
liquids, salt and sugar in, then the flour, and finally the yeast
on top, to keep the yeast separate until the mixing starts.

(1b) The new ones say to put the yeast in the bottom, cover it with
the flour, and then put everything else, including the liquids,
on top, to keep the yeast separate until the mixing starts.

To me, (a) seems more intuitively correct, but I've been
following (b) with the new one for several batches and had good
results. Any opinions?


My opinion is to follow the prep instructions for the breadmaker you
have. There have always been variations from maker to maker, some
putting the yeast in first, others putting the yeast in later. **Follow
the manufacturer's instructions.** (Especially if you like the results
you're getting.)


(2) The instructions for the new one specifically say to wash the
inside of the pan only, and not to immerse it, so obviously it
can't go in the dishwasher. (The old one went in the dishwasher
every time; to be fair, I replaced the pan twice in four years
because the spindle started getting loose, but I don't think the
dishwasher was the cause and I'm sure I read the instructions
before I started doing it.)

Is this a common restriction on new breadmakers?


I don't know. I've been making no-knead recipes for a month.
--
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http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/amytaylor
Even if you don't believe, pray for Amy today
and let the docs at Mayo strut their stuff


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Old 07-03-2008, 10:24 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.equipment
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Default New breadmaker, different procedure.

On 2008-03-07, Melba's Jammin' wrote:

(1a) The old instructions said (when using the delay timer) to put the
liquids, salt and sugar in, then the flour, and finally the yeast
on top, to keep the yeast separate until the mixing starts.

(1b) The new ones say to put the yeast in the bottom, cover it with
the flour, and then put everything else, including the liquids,
on top, to keep the yeast separate until the mixing starts.

To me, (a) seems more intuitively correct, but I've been
following (b) with the new one for several batches and had good
results. Any opinions?


My opinion is to follow the prep instructions for the breadmaker you
have. There have always been variations from maker to maker, some
putting the yeast in first, others putting the yeast in later. **Follow
the manufacturer's instructions.** (Especially if you like the results
you're getting.)


Generally a good idea! I just wondered if anyone else thought (b)
sounded funny.


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The wonderful thing about standards is that there are so
many of them to choose from. [Grace Murray Hopper]
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Old 08-03-2008, 09:24 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default New breadmaker, different procedure.

On 2008-03-07, George Shirley wrote:

I'm on my third breadmaker and all of them had the same restriction,
wash pan by hand, inside only, not to go in the dishwasher. I took a pan
on one of the old ones apart to see how it worked. The spindle is
gasketed where it goes through the pan wall at the bottom and is lightly
oiled at the factory. I assume from this that dishwasher use in cleaning
the pan destroys the gasket, the spindle gets wobbly, there is leakage
at the spindle and it gets worse from there.


The old breadmaker's manual definitely said the pan could go in the
dishwasher, but (as I think mentioned) I did replace it twice over 5
or 6 years.

It's worth pointing out that Morphy-Richards continued to supply
replacement pans at a reasonable price over that time (unlike Bosch,
who make good products but IME really gouge you on repairs and spare
parts).


I can't comment on the method of Delay baking as I've never used it.
I've been a House Husband since December 1991 and don't need no stinking
delay. VBG


The main programs I use are at least 4 hours long, so even at weekends
I usually find it more convenient to load the machine in the evening
and set it to finish when I get up in the morning.


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indeed, to Western civilization. Computer languages bring us
doorbells that chime with thirty-two tunes, alt.sex.bestiality, and
Tetris clones. (Stoll 1995)
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Old 08-03-2008, 09:49 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.equipment
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Default New breadmaker, different procedure.

On Mar 7, 11:10�am, "Julie Bove" wrote:
"Adam Funk" wrote in message

...





I just got a new breadmaker (Panasonic) and noticed two pecularities
in the instructions (compared with the old one's).


(1a) The old instructions said (when using the delay timer) to put the
� � liquids, salt and sugar in, then the flour, and finally the yeast
� � on top, to keep the yeast separate until the mixing starts.


(1b) The new ones say to put the yeast in the bottom, cover it with
� � the flour, and then put everything else, including the liquids,
� � on top, to keep the yeast separate until the mixing starts.


� � To me, (a) seems more intuitively correct, but I've been
� � following (b) with the new one for several batches and had good
� � results. �Any opinions?


(2) �The instructions for the new one specifically say to wash the
� � inside of the pan only, and not to immerse it, so obviously it
� � can't go in the dishwasher. �(The old one went in the dishwasher
� � every time; to be fair, I replaced the pan twice in four years
� � because the spindle started getting loose, but I don't think the
� � dishwasher was the cause and I'm sure I read the instructions
� � before I started doing it.)


� � Is this a common restriction on new breadmakers?


I bought mine a couple of years ago and it says to do ( b). �It doesn't seem
to work very well, but then I am using gluten free ingredients.


Huh, you can't make bread without gluten.

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Old 27-03-2008, 08:43 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,rec.food.equipment
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Default New breadmaker, different procedure. Also, gluten-free bread.

On 2008-03-07, Melba's Jammin' wrote:

[Adam]
I just got a new breadmaker (Panasonic) and noticed two pecularities
in the instructions (compared with the old one's).

(1a) The old instructions said (when using the delay timer) to put the
liquids, salt and sugar in, then the flour, and finally the yeast
on top, to keep the yeast separate until the mixing starts.

(1b) The new ones say to put the yeast in the bottom, cover it with
the flour, and then put everything else, including the liquids,
on top, to keep the yeast separate until the mixing starts.

To me, (a) seems more intuitively correct, but I've been
following (b) with the new one for several batches and had good
results. Any opinions?


My opinion is to follow the prep instructions for the breadmaker you
have. There have always been variations from maker to maker, some
putting the yeast in first, others putting the yeast in later. **Follow
the manufacturer's instructions.** (Especially if you like the results
you're getting.)


Curiously, I noticed recently that the special instructions for
gluten-free bread (for which this machine has a dedicated program) say
that you must put the yeast on top, even though you can't use the
delay timer in this case.

(But I don't need gluten-free bread so I haven't tried it.)

--
I worry that 10 or 15 years from now, [my daughter] will come to me
and say 'Daddy, where were you when they took freedom of the press
away from the Internet?' [Mike Godwin, EFF http://www.eff.org/ ]


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