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Old 17-10-2007, 05:17 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default A Strange Way To Eat That Was Once Common

It's hard to imagine that until about four hundred years ago, European
people ate everything with their fingers. When a few people started
using forks in England, everyone else thought the idea of using tools
to eat was totally ridiculous. - from the Food History section of
www.odd-info.com


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Old 17-10-2007, 06:29 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default A Strange Way To Eat That Was Once Common


"javawizard" schrieb

It's hard to imagine that until about four hundred years ago, European
people ate everything with their fingers. When a few people started
using forks in England, everyone else thought the idea of using tools
to eat was totally ridiculous. - from the Food History section of
www.odd-info.com

Strange. The quarrel about the usage of the fork started in the 11th. century.
In Venezia ...
Then there were spoon and knife ...

odd-info seems to be full of shit.

Cheers,

Michael Kuettner







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Old 17-10-2007, 07:21 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default A Strange Way To Eat That Was Once Common


"Michael Kuettner" wrote in message
...

"javawizard" schrieb

It's hard to imagine that until about four hundred years ago, European
people ate everything with their fingers. When a few people started
using forks in England, everyone else thought the idea of using tools
to eat was totally ridiculous. - from the Food History section of
www.odd-info.com

Strange. The quarrel about the usage of the fork started in the 11th.
century.
In Venezia ...
Then there were spoon and knife ...

odd-info seems to be full of shit.


*snort*

C

Cheers,

Michael Kuettner









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Old 17-10-2007, 08:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default A Strange Way To Eat That Was Once Common

Michael Kuettner wrote:


"javawizard" schrieb

It's hard to imagine that until about four hundred years ago,
European people ate everything with their fingers. When a few
people started using forks in England, everyone else thought the
idea of using tools to eat was totally ridiculous. - from the Food
History section of www.odd-info.com

Strange. The quarrel about the usage of the fork started in the 11th.
century. In Venezia ...
Then there were spoon and knife ...


Yeah, the knife used to be the primary eating utensil. In fact, as I
recall the first forks weren't even for eating, they were like minature
carving forks, with two sharp prongs. People used them to hold meat
while they cut it, then ate with the knife. Or something like that.




Brian

--
If televison's a babysitter, the Internet is a drunk librarian who
won't shut up.
-- Dorothy Gambrell (http://catandgirl.com)
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Old 17-10-2007, 09:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default A Strange Way To Eat That Was Once Common


"Default User" schrieb im Newsbeitrag
...
Michael Kuettner wrote:


"javawizard" schrieb

It's hard to imagine that until about four hundred years ago,
European people ate everything with their fingers. When a few
people started using forks in England, everyone else thought the
idea of using tools to eat was totally ridiculous. - from the Food
History section of www.odd-info.com

Strange. The quarrel about the usage of the fork started in the 11th.
century. In Venezia ...
Then there were spoon and knife ...


Yeah, the knife used to be the primary eating utensil. In fact, as I
recall the first forks weren't even for eating, they were like minature
carving forks, with two sharp prongs. People used them to hold meat
while they cut it, then ate with the knife. Or something like that.

No. The fork came from Byzantine. It was used for stuffing food
into the cake-hole.
It was originally two-pronged, as you say.
The problem with the fork was the schism of 1054; first condemnation
of a "tool for emasculated heretics" or something along those lines.
That went on until Luther ...

Cheers,

Michael Kuettner








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Old 17-10-2007, 09:23 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default A Strange Way To Eat That Was Once Common

Michael Kuettner wrote:

"javawizard" schrieb


using forks in England, everyone else thought the idea of using tools
to eat was totally ridiculous. - from the Food History section of


odd-info seems to be full of shit.


This "javawizard" guy seems to be spamming his odd-whatever
series of web pages all over the net. I assume he's trying to
drum up business as a web page designer/builder. Either that
or just trying to get click-throughs.

Bill Ranck
Blacksburg, Va.
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Old 18-10-2007, 06:08 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default A Strange Way To Eat That Was Once Common

Oh pshaw, on Wed 17 Oct 2007 10:11:34a, Janet Baraclough meant to say...

The message .com
from javawizard contains these words:

It's hard to imagine that until about four hundred years ago, European
people ate everything with their fingers. When a few people started
using forks in England, everyone else thought the idea of using tools
to eat was totally ridiculous. - from the Food History section of
www.odd-info.com


You'll be glad to hear, that history is reversing itself and once
again, European people are strating to eat with their fingers, even
adults in restaurants. First they gave up the knife and started holding
their fork in the right hand, like Americans; then they laid down their
forks and started picking up food with their hands and wiping it round
the gravy. Around the same time, many of them started holding their pen
or pencil by four fingersd against the palm, like a dagger. Soon, we
will be back to scratching pictograms on rocks, and tearing bits of raw
meat off the dog while we squat around the log-effect gas fire, grunting
to each other and fighting over the remote control.

Janet.


I've noticed the "holding the pen" thing with quite a few younger people
lately. Do they not teach penmanship in school anymore? I doubt that I
could scrawl any legible holding it that way.

It has long been proper in the US to eat asparagus with the fingers, as
well as artichokes. Don't think I've witnessed the whole meal eaten that
way yet, except for someone sopping up gravy with bread.

--
Wayne Boatwright
__________________________________________________

Answers: $1, Short: $5, Correct: $25, dumb looks
are still free.

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Old 18-10-2007, 04:36 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default A Strange Way To Eat That Was Once Common

On Oct 17, 10:17 am, javawizard wrote:
It's hard to imagine that until about four hundred years ago, European
people ate everything with their fingers. When a few people started
using forks in England, everyone else thought the idea of using tools
to eat was totally ridiculous. - from the Food History section ofwww.odd-info.com


It's fun eating mashed potatoes and gravy with (scrupulously clean)
fingers
I'd never do it in public though.

--Bryan

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Old 18-10-2007, 05:47 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default A Strange Way To Eat That Was Once Common

Oh pshaw, on Thu 18 Oct 2007 08:13:16a, l, not -l meant to say...


On 18-Oct-2007, Wayne Boatwright wrote:

I've noticed the "holding the pen" thing with quite a few younger
people lately. Do they not teach penmanship in school anymore? I
doubt that I could scrawl any legible holding it that way.


Most schools in the US do not teach, or seem to care about, penmanship.
The Pen Collectors of America (http://www.pencollectors.com/) has
adopted the Pens for Kids project as its major mission. Member
volunteers and teachers are working together to bring the use of
fountain pens and pride of penmanship to children.


That's really a shame. I won't ever forget my 2nd grade teacher who taught
us penmanship. I'm not artistic with a brush in hand, but I won several
penmanship awards. I've always taken pride in the way my writing looks,
and I still get compliments on it from strangers. I was in 2nd grade in
1952, and we used an inkwell and penpoint in holder for classes.

If interested in knowing more about the project and how you can help, or
a school near you can benefit, visit the website and navigate to the
Projects page, scroll down a half-page and read about "Pens for Kids".


I'll take a look at that.

Thanks l

--
Wayne Boatwright
__________________________________________________

Answers: $1, Short: $5, Correct: $25, dumb looks
are still free.

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Old 18-10-2007, 06:52 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default A Strange Way To Eat That Was Once Common


"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in message

I won't ever forget my 2nd grade teacher who taught
us penmanship.


Wayne Boatwright
__________________________________________________



Oh, I loved penmanship!

I was never enamored with European calligraphy, but I took Chinese and
Japanese writing (calligraphy) for a couple of years, and I fell in love
with it, too.

Smiling,
Dee Dee




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Old 18-10-2007, 07:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Oh pshaw, on Thu 18 Oct 2007 10:52:25a, Dee Dee meant to say...


"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in message

I won't ever forget my 2nd grade teacher who taught
us penmanship.


Wayne Boatwright
__________________________________________________



Oh, I loved penmanship!

I was never enamored with European calligraphy, but I took Chinese and
Japanese writing (calligraphy) for a couple of years, and I fell in love
with it, too.

Smiling,
Dee Dee




I'll bet you're good at it, too!

--
Wayne Boatwright
__________________________________________________

Answers: $1, Short: $5, Correct: $25, dumb looks
are still free.

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Old 18-10-2007, 09:15 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default A Strange Way To Eat That Was Once Common


"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in message
3.184...
Oh pshaw, on Thu 18 Oct 2007 10:52:25a, Dee Dee meant to say...


"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in message

I won't ever forget my 2nd grade teacher who taught
us penmanship.


Wayne Boatwright
__________________________________________________



Oh, I loved penmanship!

I was never enamored with European calligraphy, but I took Chinese and
Japanese writing (calligraphy) for a couple of years, and I fell in love
with it, too.

Smiling,
Dee Dee


I'll bet you're good at it, too!

--
Wayne Boatwright



Well -- sometimes we are good at things we like to do; sometimes not! ;-))
Dee Dee




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