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Old 15-06-2009, 03:12 AM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default Clay product

I brought a cooking product some time ago made from clay, which I had read
that was made from clay in the U.S., I believe it was in Ohio.

However, when this product arrived, it stated on the box that it was made in
Taiwan. I called the company I brought it from, and they said that it was a
box mis-print that that it was really made in Ohio (or made from Ohio clay
AIR). Later on I looked at the bottom of the pot and saw that it did say
Taiwan, as well, on the bottom.

I made the choice to keep the pot, but have been somewhat leary of using it
mainly because I have purchased other products made of clay made in China
that I have put away or got rid of because of possible lead content. [I
realize politically and geographically that China and Taiwan are different.]

This product is in use by Americans; and they have nothing but praise for
it. But I do wonder what is on the bottom of theirs, U.S. or Taiwan.

DH says that he thinks clay fired in Taiwan is probably not different than
ours -- I'm thinking, do we have any brand-name fired products made here in
the U.S. any longer? Pftzalgraff (sp?) is made in Mexica, AFAIK.

I bought two of these La Cloche, oblong and round, and I'm ready to use. I
guess I'm looking for some confidence.

Thanks.
Dee Dee




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Old 15-06-2009, 04:44 AM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default Clay product


"Dee Randall" wrote in message
I made the choice to keep the pot, but have been somewhat leary of using
it mainly because I have purchased other products made of clay made in
China that I have put away or got rid of because of possible lead
content. [I realize politically and geographically that China and Taiwan
are different.]


I bought two of these La Cloche, oblong and round, and I'm ready to use.
I guess I'm looking for some confidence.

Thanks.
Dee Dee


Regardless of the source, there is always some possibility of lead being in
pottery and tiles. The biggest problems is when acidic foods, especially
liquid, is in them for a long time. Such as an orange juice pitcher. Dry
and non-acidic lessen the potential considerably.

I'd use them anyway.


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Old 15-06-2009, 04:53 AM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default Clay product


"Ed Pawlowski" wrote in message
...

"Dee Randall" wrote in message
I made the choice to keep the pot, but have been somewhat leary of using
it mainly because I have purchased other products made of clay made in
China that I have put away or got rid of because of possible lead
content. [I realize politically and geographically that China and Taiwan
are different.]


I bought two of these La Cloche, oblong and round, and I'm ready to use.
I guess I'm looking for some confidence.

Thanks.
Dee Dee


Regardless of the source, there is always some possibility of lead being
in pottery and tiles. The biggest problems is when acidic foods,
especially liquid, is in them for a long time. Such as an orange juice
pitcher. Dry and non-acidic lessen the potential considerably.

I'd use them anyway.


Thanks, Ed.
Dee Dee


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Old 15-06-2009, 04:36 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
Sky Sky is offline
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Posts: 2,348
Default Clay product

Dee Randall wrote:

I brought a cooking product some time ago made from clay, which I had read
that was made from clay in the U.S., I believe it was in Ohio.

However, when this product arrived, it stated on the box that it was made in
Taiwan. I called the company I brought it from, and they said that it was a
box mis-print that that it was really made in Ohio (or made from Ohio clay
AIR). Later on I looked at the bottom of the pot and saw that it did say
Taiwan, as well, on the bottom.

I made the choice to keep the pot, but have been somewhat leary of using it
mainly because I have purchased other products made of clay made in China
that I have put away or got rid of because of possible lead content. [I
realize politically and geographically that China and Taiwan are different.]

This product is in use by Americans; and they have nothing but praise for
it. But I do wonder what is on the bottom of theirs, U.S. or Taiwan.

DH says that he thinks clay fired in Taiwan is probably not different than
ours -- I'm thinking, do we have any brand-name fired products made here in
the U.S. any longer? Pftzalgraff (sp?) is made in Mexica, AFAIK.

I bought two of these La Cloche, oblong and round, and I'm ready to use. I
guess I'm looking for some confidence.

Thanks.
Dee Dee


I wonder if a lead test kit used to detect lead in paint can be used to
test possible lead content in clay cookware? Just an idea . .. . ... .

Sky

--
Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
Ultimate Kitchen Rule -- Cook's Choice!!
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Old 15-06-2009, 10:41 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default Clay product

Dee Randall wrote:
I brought a cooking product some time ago made from clay, which I had read
that was made from clay in the U.S., I believe it was in Ohio.

However, when this product arrived, it stated on the box that it was made in
Taiwan. I called the company I brought it from, and they said that it was a
box mis-print that that it was really made in Ohio (or made from Ohio clay
AIR). Later on I looked at the bottom of the pot and saw that it did say
Taiwan, as well, on the bottom.


I'm sure that was a mis-print, too. What it was supposed to say was that
it was "Made by Taiwaneese" in Ohio.

Ohio has a bunch of pottery places in and around central Ohio. But you,
as did we, noticed that much of the stuff was imported even though they
advertise local handmade pottery.

-sw


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Old 15-06-2009, 10:48 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default Clay product


"Sqwertz" wrote in message
...
Dee Randall wrote:
I brought a cooking product some time ago made from clay, which I had
read that was made from clay in the U.S., I believe it was in Ohio.

However, when this product arrived, it stated on the box that it was made
in Taiwan. I called the company I brought it from, and they said that it
was a box mis-print that that it was really made in Ohio (or made from
Ohio clay AIR). Later on I looked at the bottom of the pot and saw that
it did say Taiwan, as well, on the bottom.


I'm sure that was a mis-print, too. What it was supposed to say was that
it was "Made by Taiwaneese" in Ohio.

Ohio has a bunch of pottery places in and around central Ohio. But you,
as did we, noticed that much of the stuff was imported even though they
advertise local handmade pottery.

-sw




Once we were traveling in Ohio, and I decided I wanted to stop in
Steubenville, Ohio to see some Steuben glass.
http://steuben.com/

No one in Steubenville had ever heard of it.

Which leaves me wondering to this day.

Dee Dee
born down the road-a-ways from Steubenville, Ohio


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Old 15-06-2009, 10:58 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Posts: 32
Default Clay product

On Mon, 15 Jun 2009 17:48:16 -0400, "Dee Randall" wrote:

Once we were traveling in Ohio, and I decided I wanted to stop in
Steubenville, Ohio to see some Steuben glass.
http://steuben.com/

No one in Steubenville had ever heard of it.

Which leaves me wondering to this day.


But Steuben has always been made in Corning, NY. Am I missing something here,
Dee?

-- Larry
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Old 16-06-2009, 03:43 AM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Posts: 2,974
Default Clay product

On Sun 14 Jun 2009 07:12:05p, Dee Randall told us...

I brought a cooking product some time ago made from clay, which I had
read that was made from clay in the U.S., I believe it was in Ohio.

However, when this product arrived, it stated on the box that it was
made in Taiwan. I called the company I brought it from, and they said
that it was a box mis-print that that it was really made in Ohio (or
made from Ohio clay AIR). Later on I looked at the bottom of the pot
and saw that it did say Taiwan, as well, on the bottom.

I made the choice to keep the pot, but have been somewhat leary of using
it mainly because I have purchased other products made of clay made in
China that I have put away or got rid of because of possible lead
content. [I realize politically and geographically that China and
Taiwan are different.]

This product is in use by Americans; and they have nothing but praise
for it. But I do wonder what is on the bottom of theirs, U.S. or
Taiwan.

DH says that he thinks clay fired in Taiwan is probably not different
than ours -- I'm thinking, do we have any brand-name fired products made
here in the U.S. any longer? Pftzalgraff (sp?) is made in Mexica,
AFAIK.

I bought two of these La Cloche, oblong and round, and I'm ready to use.
I guess I'm looking for some confidence.

Thanks.
Dee Dee


Given that these are for bread, no? I doubt that you have anything to
worry about.



--
Wayne Boatwright
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Soup is just a way of screwing you out of a meal. ~Jay Leno



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Old 16-06-2009, 05:28 AM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Posts: 2,974
Default Clay product

On Mon 15 Jun 2009 02:48:16p, Dee Randall told us...


"Sqwertz" wrote in message
...
Dee Randall wrote:
I brought a cooking product some time ago made from clay, which I had
read that was made from clay in the U.S., I believe it was in Ohio.

However, when this product arrived, it stated on the box that it was
made in Taiwan. I called the company I brought it from, and they said
that it was a box mis-print that that it was really made in Ohio (or
made from Ohio clay AIR). Later on I looked at the bottom of the pot
and saw that it did say Taiwan, as well, on the bottom.


I'm sure that was a mis-print, too. What it was supposed to say was
that it was "Made by Taiwaneese" in Ohio.

Ohio has a bunch of pottery places in and around central Ohio. But
you, as did we, noticed that much of the stuff was imported even though
they advertise local handmade pottery.

-sw




Once we were traveling in Ohio, and I decided I wanted to stop in
Steubenville, Ohio to see some Steuben glass.
http://steuben.com/

No one in Steubenville had ever heard of it.

Which leaves me wondering to this day.

Dee Dee
born down the road-a-ways from Steubenville, Ohio


Steuben is a division of Corning Glass in Corning, NY. They've been in
production in Corning since 1903. I have several of their art pieces, two
inscribed bud vases, and a set of 6 wine glasses.

Back in the late 1960s I was gifted with one of the bud vases and I bought
its companion vase. Each is inscribed with a Robert Browning phrase.
Curious if they are still in the collection, I just looked them up on the
Steuben website. You could have knocked me off my chair with a feather...
Each vase cost $85 when purchased in the late 1960s. They now sell for
$650 each. (I must be more careful when cleaning.) g

http://steuben.com/acb/product2.cfm?product=1530

--
Wayne Boatwright
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Food without wine is a corpse; wine without food is a ghost; united
and well mitched they are as body and soul, living partners.
~Andre Simon



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Old 16-06-2009, 03:37 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Posts: 2,313
Default Clay product


wrote in message
...
On Mon, 15 Jun 2009 17:48:16 -0400, "Dee Randall"
wrote:

Once we were traveling in Ohio, and I decided I wanted to stop in
Steubenville, Ohio to see some Steuben glass.
http://steuben.com/

No one in Steubenville had ever heard of it.

Which leaves me wondering to this day.


But Steuben has always been made in Corning, NY. Am I missing something
here,
Dee?

-- Larry




Which now no longer leaves me wondering. :-)))

My thoughts were at the time (being the hick I was raised) and hearing of
this glass that it 'was' made in Steubenville.
That's how we are back in WV/Ohio River.

Thanks, Larry.
Dee Dee




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Old 16-06-2009, 03:41 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Posts: 2,313
Default Clay product


"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in message
5.250...
On Mon 15 Jun 2009 02:48:16p, Dee Randall told us...


"Sqwertz" wrote in message
...
Dee Randall wrote:
I brought a cooking product some time ago made from clay, which I had
read that was made from clay in the U.S., I believe it was in Ohio.

However, when this product arrived, it stated on the box that it was
made in Taiwan. I called the company I brought it from, and they said
that it was a box mis-print that that it was really made in Ohio (or
made from Ohio clay AIR). Later on I looked at the bottom of the pot
and saw that it did say Taiwan, as well, on the bottom.

I'm sure that was a mis-print, too. What it was supposed to say was
that it was "Made by Taiwaneese" in Ohio.

Ohio has a bunch of pottery places in and around central Ohio. But
you, as did we, noticed that much of the stuff was imported even though
they advertise local handmade pottery.

-sw




Once we were traveling in Ohio, and I decided I wanted to stop in
Steubenville, Ohio to see some Steuben glass.
http://steuben.com/

No one in Steubenville had ever heard of it.

Which leaves me wondering to this day.

Dee Dee
born down the road-a-ways from Steubenville, Ohio


Steuben is a division of Corning Glass in Corning, NY. They've been in
production in Corning since 1903. I have several of their art pieces, two
inscribed bud vases, and a set of 6 wine glasses.

Back in the late 1960s I was gifted with one of the bud vases and I bought
its companion vase. Each is inscribed with a Robert Browning phrase.
Curious if they are still in the collection, I just looked them up on the
Steuben website. You could have knocked me off my chair with a feather...
Each vase cost $85 when purchased in the late 1960s. They now sell for
$650 each. (I must be more careful when cleaning.) g

http://steuben.com/acb/product2.cfm?product=1530

--
Wayne Boatwright




Using my inflation calculator, I see that 1960 $85 is in 2008 is $611.34.

Please don't burst my bubble and inform me that Dean Martin was not born in
Steubenville, Ohio.
(I looked it up to confirm it just now.)

I must've got Steuben glass and Dean confused :-))

Thanks, Wayne.
Dee Dee



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Old 16-06-2009, 03:45 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default Clay product


"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in message
5.247...
On Sun 14 Jun 2009 07:12:05p, Dee Randall told us...

I brought a cooking product some time ago made from clay, which I had
read that was made from clay in the U.S., I believe it was in Ohio.

However, when this product arrived, it stated on the box that it was
made in Taiwan. I called the company I brought it from, and they said
that it was a box mis-print that that it was really made in Ohio (or
made from Ohio clay AIR). Later on I looked at the bottom of the pot
and saw that it did say Taiwan, as well, on the bottom.

I made the choice to keep the pot, but have been somewhat leary of using
it mainly because I have purchased other products made of clay made in
China that I have put away or got rid of because of possible lead
content. [I realize politically and geographically that China and
Taiwan are different.]

This product is in use by Americans; and they have nothing but praise
for it. But I do wonder what is on the bottom of theirs, U.S. or
Taiwan.

DH says that he thinks clay fired in Taiwan is probably not different
than ours -- I'm thinking, do we have any brand-name fired products made
here in the U.S. any longer? Pftzalgraff (sp?) is made in Mexica,
AFAIK.

I bought two of these La Cloche, oblong and round, and I'm ready to use.
I guess I'm looking for some confidence.

Thanks.
Dee Dee


Given that these are for bread, no? I doubt that you have anything to
worry about.



--
Wayne Boatwright



I ate 4 slices of bread last night and had leg cramps during the ngiht.
But on further thought, I think it must've been the wine I consumed along
with it. :-))

BTW, I followed the instructions as I usally do for first time use of
anything, even though it goes against my 'years-of-experience.'
I shouldn't have done that. The bread stuck and we had to scrape it off -
the corn meal 'might have' helped, but didn't work.

With anything else stone when baking bread, I have never put dough on top of
a cold stone, which is what Williams-Sonama recipe said to do.
What a crock - !! I can really get stupid sometimes.

Dee Dee


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Old 16-06-2009, 03:46 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default Clay product


"Sky" wrote in message
...
Dee Randall wrote:

I brought a cooking product some time ago made from clay, which I had
read
that was made from clay in the U.S., I believe it was in Ohio.

However, when this product arrived, it stated on the box that it was made
in
Taiwan. I called the company I brought it from, and they said that it
was a
box mis-print that that it was really made in Ohio (or made from Ohio
clay
AIR). Later on I looked at the bottom of the pot and saw that it did say
Taiwan, as well, on the bottom.

I made the choice to keep the pot, but have been somewhat leary of using
it
mainly because I have purchased other products made of clay made in China
that I have put away or got rid of because of possible lead content. [I
realize politically and geographically that China and Taiwan are
different.]

This product is in use by Americans; and they have nothing but praise for
it. But I do wonder what is on the bottom of theirs, U.S. or Taiwan.

DH says that he thinks clay fired in Taiwan is probably not different
than
ours -- I'm thinking, do we have any brand-name fired products made here
in
the U.S. any longer? Pftzalgraff (sp?) is made in Mexica, AFAIK.

I bought two of these La Cloche, oblong and round, and I'm ready to use.
I
guess I'm looking for some confidence.

Thanks.
Dee Dee


I wonder if a lead test kit used to detect lead in paint can be used to
test possible lead content in clay cookware? Just an idea . .. . ... .

Sky



Sky, I answered your post, but I see it got lost.
To make it short, thanks.
Dee Dee


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Old 16-06-2009, 06:43 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default Clay product

On Tue, 16 Jun 2009 10:45:35 -0400, "Dee Randall" wrote:

....I shouldn't have done that. The bread stuck and we had to scrape it off -
the corn meal 'might have' helped, but didn't work.

With anything else stone when baking bread, I have never put dough on top of
a cold stone, which is what Williams-Sonama recipe said to do.


We *always* use a piece of parchment paper. It never hurts, and often helps.

-- Larry
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Old 16-06-2009, 06:54 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,313
Default Clay product


wrote in message
...
On Tue, 16 Jun 2009 10:45:35 -0400, "Dee Randall"
wrote:

....I shouldn't have done that. The bread stuck and we had to scrape it
off -
the corn meal 'might have' helped, but didn't work.

With anything else stone when baking bread, I have never put dough on top
of
a cold stone, which is what Williams-Sonama recipe said to do.


We *always* use a piece of parchment paper. It never hurts, and often
helps.

-- Larry



I usually bake bread on my hr.-long heated stone, sometimes using parchment
paper if it's slack; but I use tons of parchment paper. Parchment paper is
my choice for non-cleanup. I use it a lot in all sorts of baking pans
underneath the veggies when roasting, and underneath veggies when cooking,
then covering with aluminum foil. I feel that aluminum foil leaves a
detectable taste if put underneath the ingredient.

:-)) Yes, I should have done all the things I know to do with this La
Cloche -- but by golly, I thought I'd do it the way Chuck Williams
(Williams-Sonoma) said, first. My BIG mistake. Even though 74, I still
"hark" back to my mother's retort when I do something stupid, "Why did you
do that, Dee?"

Yep, it's still soaking off, as I write. DH is making some espresso as we
speak, so all is well.

Thanks, Larry.
Dee Dee







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