Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-04-2005, 03:43 AM
tranch
 
Posts: n/a
Default Turkey


Did my first pork shoulder the other day and it turned out just fine. So
now I'm feeling like I can barbecue just about any thing and have decided to
do a turkey I've had in the freezer for a while.
I read the FAC and the author seems to make it sound like a turkey is
some what difficult to do for a beginner like myself. Is it really that hard
to barbecue a turkey or am I just getting the beginner jitters? Any tips
will be greatly appreciated!!!

--
You're just jealous because the voices only talk to me.



  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-04-2005, 04:35 AM
Edwin Pawlowski
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"tranch" wrote in message

I read the FAC and the author seems to make it sound like a turkey is
some what difficult to do for a beginner like myself. Is it really that
hard to barbecue a turkey or am I just getting the beginner jitters? Any
tips will be greatly appreciated!!!


No, turkey is very easy. You can use hotter temperatures, more like 300 to
325 and time it the same as in your oven. It does not need to be slow
cooked to tenderize it like a brisket or pork shoulder. Just don't overcook
and dry it out.


  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-04-2005, 10:55 AM
Wally Bedford
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Mon, 25 Apr 2005 21:43:23 -0500, "tranch"
reported to us:


Did my first pork shoulder the other day and it turned out just fine. So
now I'm feeling like I can barbecue just about any thing and have decided to
do a turkey I've had in the freezer for a while.
I read the FAC and the author seems to make it sound like a turkey is
some what difficult to do for a beginner like myself. Is it really that hard
to barbecue a turkey or am I just getting the beginner jitters? Any tips
will be greatly appreciated!!!


I find Turkeys easeir than shoulders! Brining the thing is trickier.

This is the best poultry brine out there, might as well start with the
best. Hound was a legend on this board, may God rest his soul. If
you like this brine, google his chili.

Hound's Citrus Brined Chicken

Prepare the brine:
1 gallon water
1 cup Kosher salt or 1/2 cup table salt
juice of 3 oranges
juice of three limes
juice of three lemons
rinds from same
1 sliced white onion
1 head of garlic, crushed
stems from a bunch of cilantro, chopped
serranos to taste, minimum of 4
rough ground cumin and coriander 2 Tbsp each
1/4 cup chili powder or any ground chile you prefer
(1/4 cup onion powder is optional)
(1/4cup garlic powder is optional)

Place the bird(s) and plenty of brine solution in a ziploc bag(s) and
leave refrigerated overnight prior to cooking. A cooler works fine
also.
I use a 5 gal beverage cooler for all but the biggest turkeys.
Frozen
soda bottles, or ice can be used to keep the cold. {8 lbs of ice= 1
gallon of water} An hour before cooking take the bird out and
thoroughly wash it down with cold water for at least 30 seconds. You
can place aromatics like garlic heads, apples, citrus in the cavity of
the bird for the cooking. I like also to place orange slices between
skin and meat. Smoke rear end of chicken toward the fire for 45
minutes/lb @ 225F until the thigh is about 170F. You can rotate as
necessary to avoid charring. Cooking this way will result in inedible
skin, but juicy chicken. If you like the crispy skin then place the
chicken near the firebox. This works for either chickens or turkeys.
If you eliminate the brine (salt and water) the rest of the recipe
makes
an excellent marinade for grilled chicken.


Wally

"No one has ever had an idea in a dress suit."
Sir Frederick G. Banting
  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-04-2005, 12:34 PM
Matthew L. Martin
 
Posts: n/a
Default

tranch wrote:
Did my first pork shoulder the other day and it turned out just fine. So
now I'm feeling like I can barbecue just about any thing and have decided to
do a turkey I've had in the freezer for a while.
I read the FAC and the author seems to make it sound like a turkey is
some what difficult to do for a beginner like myself. Is it really that hard
to barbecue a turkey or am I just getting the beginner jitters? Any tips
will be greatly appreciated!!!


As you will see/have seen there are two (at least) schools of thought on
what to do with poulty. You can roast with smoke (typical oven
temperature and timing) or you can slow cook at 225-275F with the wood
smoke. The results of the two methods are very different products.

Roasted turkey/chicken/duck will be similar to what you get in the oven
with some smoke character in the flavor. The skin will be crispy and the
flesh will be firm. A great time saver is to spatchcock the bird. This
makes it much flatter which allows it to cook more quickly.

Hot smoked turkey/chicken/duck is a different beast. The skin will be
soft and rubbery. The flesh will be softer, succulent and deeply
flavored with the smoke.

I suggest you try both methods using something managable. A five pound
chicken will take about 5-6 hours at 250 to reach 161 at the joint where
the thigh meets the body. If you don't like it hot smoked, you will only
have wasted $5.

I'll bet you will like it.

--
Matthew

I'm a contractor. If you want an opinion, I'll sell you one.
Which one do you want?
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-04-2005, 11:37 PM
Brick
 
Posts: n/a
Default


On 26-Apr-2005, "Matthew L. Martin" wrote:

tranch wrote:
Did my first pork shoulder the other day and it turned out just
fine. So
now I'm feeling like I can barbecue just about any thing and have
decided to
do a turkey I've had in the freezer for a while.
I read the FAC and the author seems to make it sound like a turkey
is
some what difficult to do for a beginner like myself. Is it really that
hard
to barbecue a turkey or am I just getting the beginner jitters? Any tips

will be greatly appreciated!!!


As you will see/have seen there are two (at least) schools of thought on
what to do with poulty. You can roast with smoke (typical oven
temperature and timing) or you can slow cook at 225-275F with the wood
smoke. The results of the two methods are very different products.

Roasted turkey/chicken/duck will be similar to what you get in the oven
with some smoke character in the flavor. The skin will be crispy and the
flesh will be firm. A great time saver is to spatchcock the bird. This
makes it much flatter which allows it to cook more quickly.

Hot smoked turkey/chicken/duck is a different beast. The skin will be
soft and rubbery. The flesh will be softer, succulent and deeply
flavored with the smoke.

I suggest you try both methods using something managable. A five pound
chicken will take about 5-6 hours at 250 to reach 161 at the joint where
the thigh meets the body. If you don't like it hot smoked, you will only
have wasted $5.

I'll bet you will like it.

--
Matthew


What Mathew said. And it's true that poultry does not benefit from low, slow
cooking in the same sense that pork butt or brisket does. However, it does
achieve a texture entirely different from traditional roasting temperatures.
I
wouldn't think about bragging on one method over the other. however the
differences produced by low/slow, oven roasting and grilling are significant
enough for each to have it's time in the limelight. I like to spatchcock for
grilling and usually use a dry rub. I may or may not brine for oven (type)
roasting, but almost always cook the bird on a vertical wire rack. (Not to
be confused with a beer can). The wire rack allows full heat circulation
inside the bird. I use the same rack for low and slow, but I generally
brine a bird for that. Hound's brine is hard to beat for a low and slow
cooked bird. There might be a better one, but I don't care. How long
to brine? I don't know. I soak mine for two days. Is that necessary? I
have no idea. It works for me and I'm not bothered by the timeframe.
If guests drop in unexpectedly and you decide to feed poultry, I'd
suggest spatchcocking and grilling. Poultry isn't steak, so don't get
the fire too hot. You have to cook the poultry all the way through and
you probably don't want to burn the outside. In my opinion, frequent
flipping to avoid burning is not a very intelligent use of your equipment.
(It interferes with drinking)

Just my 2.

Brick (Keep the shiny side up)

----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+ Newsgroups
----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =----


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Turkey Tetrazini (was What to do with leftover turkey) Virginia Tadrzynski General Cooking 3 31-12-2006 10:45 PM
Quick and Easy Turkey Gravy using Home Made Turkey Stock Duckie Recipes 0 01-11-2005 12:21 AM
Poll: Is it a bad idea to add leftover turkey juice gravy to turkey stock? I didn't drink the punch. General Cooking 2 09-12-2003 04:53 PM
Lost turkey recipe (skin wrapped stuffed boneless turkey) jammer General Cooking 3 23-11-2003 12:05 AM
making turkey gravy without roasting a turkey.. McGuirk1 General Cooking 7 19-11-2003 05:25 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:02 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017