Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 19-02-2006, 03:32 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default The rare and elusive #100 (and other) scoops...

Hi,

New to the forum and to the business of finding 'specialty' kitchen
gadets that make our lives infinitely easier. My latest quest is to
find a good supplier of small quick-release scoops. We've been
borrowing a presumably dated rubbermaid #100 scoop which has been
absolutley perfect for a number of recipes but I've only been able to
find one supplier of anything close to it and those aren't nearly as
ergonomic (all flat stainless steel grips instead of the nice molded
plastic kind on the rubbermaid that make the squeezing action much
easier).

Unfortunately the people we are borrowing it from are being completely
unreasonable and actually want it back. The nerve!

Anyone have any good leads? Thanks.


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Old 19-02-2006, 11:32 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default The rare and elusive #100 (and other) scoops...

23straightman wrote:

We've been
borrowing a presumably dated rubbermaid #100 scoop which has been
absolutley perfect for a number of recipes but I've only been able to
find one supplier of anything close to it and those aren't nearly as
ergonomic (all flat stainless steel grips instead of the nice molded
plastic kind on the rubbermaid that make the squeezing action much
easier).


Most American scoops are designated as what part of a quart they are. So
a #100 scoop would be 1/100 of a quart.

They have them here. They say they're 3/8 of an ounce. These are a
different design than either you described. I prefer these.

http://www.globeequipment.com/Vendors/Vollrath/Kitchen+Supplies/VOL!47161.html

Pastorio
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Old 19-02-2006, 11:39 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default The rare and elusive #100 (and other) scoops...

I got a small scoop (not sure of the size) at the Cash &
Carry, where they've got quite a few sizes to choose from.
If you're on the West Coast of the US, look for a Smart &
Final / Cash & Carry store.
http://www.smartandfinal.com/locations.aspx

A restaurant supply store would also be a good place to
look.


--
-- Steve
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Old 20-02-2006, 06:54 AM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default The rare and elusive #100 (and other) scoops...

On Sun 19 Feb 2006 04:32:11p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Bob (this
one)?

23straightman wrote:

We've been
borrowing a presumably dated rubbermaid #100 scoop which has been
absolutley perfect for a number of recipes but I've only been able to
find one supplier of anything close to it and those aren't nearly as
ergonomic (all flat stainless steel grips instead of the nice molded
plastic kind on the rubbermaid that make the squeezing action much
easier).


Most American scoops are designated as what part of a quart they are. So
a #100 scoop would be 1/100 of a quart.

They have them here. They say they're 3/8 of an ounce. These are a
different design than either you described. I prefer these.

http://www.globeequipment.com/Vendors/Vollrath/Kitchen+Supplies/VOL!4716
1.html


Any idea what the diameter of the bowl is?

--
Wayne Boatwright ożo
____________________

BIOYA
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Old 20-02-2006, 06:43 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default Christmas Fruitcakes

Wayne,

Saw your recent post and wondered how your Christmas Fruitcakes turned out.
Never too early to get news of what's good and bad.

Shirley in AZ




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Old 20-02-2006, 08:09 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default The rare and elusive #100 (and other) scoops...

I purchased a 1.25 inch diameter scoop from Williams Sonoma, when they
were out of stocvk and I got tired of waiting for the online catalog of
(I forgot) either Chef's Catalog.com or else Cooking.com.

Perfect size for drop cookies. Wish I had discovered it years ago.

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Old 21-02-2006, 01:08 AM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default The rare and elusive #100 (and other) scoops...

King Arthur Catalog has a couple of scoops with nice comfortable plastic
handles. I use one for my cookies and think it's my favorite purchase from
their catalog.
http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/

Click on catalog and enter cookie scoops in the search box

Rina


"23straightman" wrote in message
oups.com...
Hi,

New to the forum and to the business of finding 'specialty' kitchen
gadets that make our lives infinitely easier. My latest quest is to
find a good supplier of small quick-release scoops. We've been
borrowing a presumably dated rubbermaid #100 scoop which has been
absolutley perfect for a number of recipes but I've only been able to
find one supplier of anything close to it and those aren't nearly as
ergonomic (all flat stainless steel grips instead of the nice molded
plastic kind on the rubbermaid that make the squeezing action much
easier).

Unfortunately the people we are borrowing it from are being completely
unreasonable and actually want it back. The nerve!

Anyone have any good leads? Thanks.



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Old 21-02-2006, 01:15 AM posted to rec.food.baking
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Posts: 61
Default The rare and elusive #100 (and other) scoops...

Here's your lead.

The Scoops that I referred to in my previous post sold by KA Catalog are
Zeroll Scoops.

Doing a "Google " search I found several sites that sell them.
Here they list them by diameter and by #, a #100 scoop being the smallest at
1.25"
http://tinyurl.com/q6znn

Rina


"23straightman" wrote in message
oups.com...
Hi,

New to the forum and to the business of finding 'specialty' kitchen
gadets that make our lives infinitely easier. My latest quest is to
find a good supplier of small quick-release scoops. We've been
borrowing a presumably dated rubbermaid #100 scoop which has been
absolutley perfect for a number of recipes but I've only been able to
find one supplier of anything close to it and those aren't nearly as
ergonomic (all flat stainless steel grips instead of the nice molded
plastic kind on the rubbermaid that make the squeezing action much
easier).

Anyone have any good leads? Thanks.



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Old 25-02-2006, 02:27 AM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default The rare and elusive #100 (and other) scoops...

Thanks everyone. Found a few new sites for other needed stuff too from
your suggestions. Really appreciate it.

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Old 27-02-2006, 06:15 AM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default Christmas Fruitcakes

On Mon 20 Feb 2006 11:43:11a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Shirley
Ward?

Wayne,

Saw your recent post and wondered how your Christmas Fruitcakes turned
out. Never too early to get news of what's good and bad.

Shirley in AZ


Shirley, thank you for remembering... Alas, we cut into only one fruitcake
on Christmas day and sampled small slices. Our need to return to Weight
Watchers, as well as tending to our type 2 diabetic needs forced me to
"feed" the cakes thoroughly, wrap securely, and put into the freezer. So no
comparative tasting this season. At least they will keep well. :-) The cake
we sampled was one my great grandmother used to make. It was even
"fruitier" than I remember, and quite delicious. I'm glad I don't make daily
trips to the freezer. I would be much too tempted! :-)

--
Wayne Boatwright ożo
____________________

BIOYA


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Old 28-02-2006, 12:10 AM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default Christmas Fruitcakes

Wayne, would you be willing to share your Grandmother's fruitcake recipe?

Shirley in AZ


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Old 28-02-2006, 12:54 AM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default Christmas Fruitcakes

On Mon 27 Feb 2006 05:10:05p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Shirley Ward?

Wayne, would you be willing to share your Grandmother's fruitcake recipe?

Shirley in AZ


Yes, I'll be glad to. I just need to dig it out and key it. It's one I have
never put in the computer.

--
Wayne Boatwright ożo
____________________

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Old 28-02-2006, 04:54 AM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default Christmas Fruitcakes

On Mon 27 Feb 2006 05:10:05p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Shirley
Ward?

Wayne, would you be willing to share your Grandmother's fruitcake recipe?

Shirley in AZ


Shirley, this is a very long recipe, but in spite of that, it's quite
simple.


Onnie's Dark Fruitcake

2 cups golden raisins
1 cup dark raisins
1 cup currants
2 cups dried apricot halves -- snipped into ½" pieces
2 cups dried figs -- halved, stems discarded
1 cup pitted prunes -- snipped into ½" pieces
1 cup whole pitted dates
3 cups English walnuts -- in halves or large pieces
2 cups pecans -- in halves or large pieces
1 cup filberts -- halved
2 cups candied cherries (red and green -- if possible)
2 cups candied pineapple slices -- cut in wedges
1 cup candied lemon peel
1 cup candied orange peel
1 cup candied citron
3 oranges -- grated zest only
3 lemons -- grated zest only
1/2 cup chopped candied ginger
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground allspice
1 teaspoon mace
1/2 teaspoon ground doves.
1 cup molasses
2 cups brandy
1/2 cup orange liqueur (my addition)
4 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1 pound butter -- (4 sticks or 2 cups)
3 cups dark brown sugar
8 eggs
1 tablespoon vanilla extract

The day before you make the fruitcake, combine all the dried fruits, the
nuts, and citrus zests in a large mixing bowl or kettle. Sprinkle on the
candied ginger and the spices, and toss well to mix. Add the molasses,
brandy, and orange liqueur, and mix well. Cover and let stand overnight,
stirring once or twice. (The mixture may sit for several days, if you wish.
Stir it occasionally, and add a little more brandy if it has been
absorbed.)

The day you make the cakes, preheat the oven to 275°E Grease four 9 x 5 x
3-inch loaf pans, line the bottoms with brown paper, grease the paper, then
roll flour about the pans to coat them lightly and evenly. Knock out excess
flour.

Sprinkle 1 cup of the flour over the fruit mixture and stir well. Combine
the remaining 3 cups flour with the baking powder, baking soda, and salt,
and sift them together onto a piece of waxed paper; set aside. Cream the
butter, then add the brown sugar and beat well. Add the eggs two at a time,
beating well after each addition, then beat in the vanilla. Add the
combined dry ingredients and beat until the batter is thoroughly blended
and perfectly smooth. Pour the batter over the fruit mixture (you might
need to do this in a large tub or a clean dishpan if you have made the full
recipe) and mix well until all of the pieces of fruit are coated with
batter-your clean hands are the best tools for this.

Divide the batter among the prepared loaf pans, filling them within 1/2
inch of the top. Bake the cakes for about 2 hours: each cake will rise just
above the rim of the pan, the top will crack slightly in several places,
and there will be a faint line of shrinkage around the edge of the pan. An
ice pick or long wooden skewer inserted in the center of a cake should come
out clean, or with just a slight residue of sticky fruit, but no raw
batter. Remove the cakes from the oven and place them on a rack to cool for
about 30 minutes. Turn out of the pans, peel off the waxed paper, and let
cool top side up on a rack. If you wish, pour an additional tablespoon or
two of brandy over the cakes as they cool.

To sto Wrap each one first in plastic wrap, then in a secure wrapping of
foil, and keep in a cool place. Or, if you wish, you may first wrap each
cake in a brandy-soaked cloth, then in foil, and store as directed above.
The cakes will keep for months. To serve, cut in thin slices with a long
serrated knife.

--
Wayne Boatwright ożo
____________________

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Old 28-02-2006, 04:55 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default Christmas Fruitcakes

Thanks Wayne, I am anxious to try it. Sounds as though it would be very
flavorful and lots of good fruit!

Shirley in AZ


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Old 01-03-2006, 12:55 AM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default Christmas Fruitcakes

On Tue 28 Feb 2006 09:55:12a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Shirley Ward?

Thanks Wayne, I am anxious to try it. Sounds as though it would be very
flavorful and lots of good fruit!


You're welcome. Obviously, this makes a lot of cake, and the recipe can be
reduced, at least by half. I almost always make the full recipe, however,
because it stores/freezes quite well.

As I said, I wasn't able to compare the various cakes yet, but this has been
my favorite for many years.

Enjoy...

--
Wayne Boatwright ożo
____________________

BIOYA


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