Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 09-02-2006, 01:44 AM posted to rec.food.baking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1
Default Can I modify a bread recipe to use "the sponge method"

hey, folks. I am enjoying Greg Patent's "Baking in America". Great
bread recipes turn out super every time. Most of his bread recipes use
"the sponge method". But several do not. Do you think I can modify
those successfully in order to use "the sponge method"?


  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 09-02-2006, 03:09 AM posted to rec.food.baking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,025
Default Can I modify a bread recipe to use "the sponge method"

Dick from green lake wi wrote:

hey, folks. I am enjoying Greg Patent's "Baking in America". Great
bread recipes turn out super every time. Most of his bread recipes use
"the sponge method". But several do not. Do you think I can modify
those successfully in order to use "the sponge method"?


Recipes, of course, can be adapted. How much experimentation would be
necessary is the question. He favors sponges. The fact that he didn't
use them for the specific recipes might mean that the results were
better this way.

Pastorio
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 25-02-2006, 12:39 AM posted to rec.food.baking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1
Default Can I modify a bread recipe to use "the sponge method"

Bob (this one) wrote...
Dick from green lake wi wrote:

hey, folks. I am enjoying Greg Patent's "Baking in America". Great
bread recipes turn out super every time. Most of his bread recipes use
"the sponge method". But several do not. Do you think I can modify
those successfully in order to use "the sponge method"?



Recipes, of course, can be adapted. How much experimentation would be
necessary is the question. He favors sponges. The fact that he didn't
use them for the specific recipes might mean that the results were
better this way.


I'm on a sourdough trip lately and use starter to make sponge all the
time. The trick is that you must know precisely how much flour and
water are in the sponge, and you will need an accurate scale and make
sure to convert everything to grams. All you have to do is calculate
the amounts of flour and water already in the amount of starter you
plan to use and subtract those from the total called for in the recipe.

For example, I keep my starter at 150% hydration, which means for 100g
of flour there is 150g of water. Last night I prepared a sponge for
today for a loaf containing a total of 250g of flour (500cc or slightly
over 2 cups). Depending on how firm or sticky you want the final dough
to be, the typical hydration range is from 58% to 65%, and I chose 62%
for this experiment. 250g * 0.62 = 155g of water. At a known 150%
hydration level, the 60g of starter I used contained 20g flour and 40g
of water. Therefore, I needed to add 230g of flour and 115g of water
(along with the salt and oil) for the final dough.

Oh, and everyone tells me not to use salt in starter, it should contain
only flour and water and of course the old starter used to innoculate it.
You only add it to the final dough. BTW, sifted white wheat flour seems
to weigh in grams almost exactly half as much as its volume in cubic
centimeters (cc or ml), so a 3-cup recipe would be 237cc * 3 = 711cc / 2
= 356g. But I doubt it is exactly half, so you may need to tweak the
hydration slightly after experimenting a bit.


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Recipe: Pop Up Bread (Another "heirloom" recipe) jmcquown[_2_] General Cooking 21 27-02-2009 06:30 PM
Amish "Friendship Bread" recipe in SD Dusty da baker Sourdough 0 13-08-2007 07:14 PM
To hell with "The Well Method." (long) Curt Nelson General Cooking 9 30-03-2007 08:33 AM
seeking advice on best method for preparing "top round steak" Meg General Cooking 10 09-06-2006 06:17 PM
A Simple "Brown" Bread Sourdough Recipe HAL 9000 Sourdough 0 08-06-2006 10:03 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 01:16 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017