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Old 08-06-2006, 03:54 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
Meg Meg is offline
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Default seeking advice on best method for preparing "top round steak"

I just sucumbed to the low price on two nice looking pieces of top
round steak each cut about 1.5" thick, very lean, with a moderate
amount of fat trimming the edges. In the past I often asked the
butcher to grind this cut because I do enjoy it as a hamburger or in a
meatloaf. The butcher was no longer on duty so I decided to take the
steaks home and cut it into cubes to be used in the preparation of beef
stew.
I am new to this group and I thought it would be fun to get some new
ideas about how to prepare this cut of beef. I find it to be too tough
a cut to either pan fry or broil but I am interested in what others
have prepared with success.
Thanks


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Old 08-06-2006, 06:16 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default seeking advice on best method for preparing "top round steak"

In article . com,
"Meg" wrote:

I just sucumbed to the low price on two nice looking pieces of top
round steak each cut about 1.5" thick, very lean, with a moderate
amount of fat trimming the edges. In the past I often asked the
butcher to grind this cut because I do enjoy it as a hamburger or in a
meatloaf. The butcher was no longer on duty so I decided to take the
steaks home and cut it into cubes to be used in the preparation of beef
stew.
I am new to this group and I thought it would be fun to get some new
ideas about how to prepare this cut of beef. I find it to be too tough
a cut to either pan fry or broil but I am interested in what others
have prepared with success.
Thanks


Raw, Tartar.

Seriously......

I use only top or trimmed bottom round to make steak tartar.
It's amazingly tender if uncooked.

Otherwise, I'd use it to make pot roast. Long, slow cooking will also
tenderize it. Crock pot or braise.
--
Peace!
Om

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch"
-- Jack Nicholson
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Old 08-06-2006, 08:35 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default seeking advice on best method for preparing "top round steak"


OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
In article . com,
"Meg" wrote:

I just sucumbed to the low price on two nice looking pieces of top
round steak each cut about 1.5" thick, very lean, with a moderate
amount of fat trimming the edges. In the past I often asked the
butcher to grind this cut because I do enjoy it as a hamburger or in a
meatloaf. The butcher was no longer on duty so I decided to take the
steaks home and cut it into cubes to be used in the preparation of beef
stew.
I am new to this group and I thought it would be fun to get some new
ideas about how to prepare this cut of beef. I find it to be too tough
a cut to either pan fry or broil but I am interested in what others
have prepared with success.
Thanks


Raw, Tartar.

Seriously......

I use only top or trimmed bottom round to make steak tartar.
It's amazingly tender if uncooked.

Otherwise, I'd use it to make pot roast. Long, slow cooking will also
tenderize it. Crock pot or braise.


You can also use it for Swiss steak, or even tenderize the bejibbers
out of it and make "chicken fried steak" with cream gravy. Long and
slow cooking. You could do a Stroganoff type dish with it, too - brown
the strips of meat, then cook until tender, then add the sour cream,
mushrooms and other stuff.

N.

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Old 08-06-2006, 09:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default seeking advice on best method for preparing "top round steak"


"Meg" wrote in message
ups.com...
I just sucumbed to the low price on two nice looking pieces of top
round steak each cut about 1.5" thick, very lean, with a moderate
amount of fat trimming the edges. In the past I often asked the
butcher to grind this cut because I do enjoy it as a hamburger or in a
meatloaf. The butcher was no longer on duty so I decided to take the
steaks home and cut it into cubes to be used in the preparation of beef
stew.
I am new to this group and I thought it would be fun to get some new
ideas about how to prepare this cut of beef. I find it to be too tough
a cut to either pan fry or broil but I am interested in what others
have prepared with success.


You can make chicken fried steak or any braised steak recipe with it.
Sometimes I dump diced canned tomatoes, bell peppers and onions over it and
bake until tender. Or I saute onions and mushrooms and add beef broth and
bake until tender and then turn the juices into a nice sauce.

Ms P


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Old 09-06-2006, 03:15 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
Meg Meg is offline
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Default seeking advice on best method for preparing "top round steak"


Steve Wertz wrote:
On 8 Jun 2006 07:54:39 -0700, Meg wrote:

I am new to this group and I thought it would be fun to get some new
ideas about how to prepare this cut of beef. I find it to be too tough
a cut to either pan fry or broil but I am interested in what others
have prepared with success.
Thanks


I stab it about 30 times with my jacquard, and usually do either a
teryaki/green onion or chipotle/orange marinade, then broil
quickly. Then slice thinly at a steep angle.

-sw


Your marinade ideas sound very good, similar to ones I use on broiled
salmon. How long do you marinate before broiling and at that level of
physical tenderizing is it possible to get a nicely browned exterior
and a rare to medium rare interior.
The slice thinly at a steep angle is how I deal with a London broil and
you are right it makes a huge difference.
I am the carver in the household; and as I have chronic wrist and
shoulder pain from making a living banging away at a computer keyboard
I don't serve such labor intensive dishes. Besides I am happy to have
had my turn with cutting up my children's food. Now that we are all
grownup around here I prefer being able to just sit down and enjoy my
meal without facing another task.
My mother was the one who taught me how to carve. She also taught me
the merits of squeezing some lemon juice on each side of a steak just 5
or 10 minutes before broiling or grilling. She was a wonderful cook who
prepared three meals a day because my Dad would come home for work for
lunch. He passed in 1999 and my Mom took a break from all that cooking.
She died at age 87 this past February. All this makes me miss her so.
I appreciate all she taught me and have sweet memories of her delight
with learning new ingredients and recipes from me.



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Old 09-06-2006, 03:30 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
Meg Meg is offline
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Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 4
Default seeking advice on best method for preparing "top round steak"

OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
In article . com,
"Meg" wrote:

I just sucumbed to the low price on two nice looking pieces of top
round steak each cut about 1.5" thick, very lean, with a moderate
amount of fat trimming the edges. In the past I often asked the
butcher to grind this cut because I do enjoy it as a hamburger or in a
meatloaf. The butcher was no longer on duty so I decided to take the
steaks home and cut it into cubes to be used in the preparation of beef
stew.
I am new to this group and I thought it would be fun to get some new
ideas about how to prepare this cut of beef. I find it to be too tough
a cut to either pan fry or broil but I am interested in what others
have prepared with success.
Thanks


Raw, Tartar.

Seriously......

I use only top or trimmed bottom round to make steak tartar.
It's amazingly tender if uncooked.

Otherwise, I'd use it to make pot roast. Long, slow cooking will also
tenderize it. Crock pot or braise.
--
Peace!
Om

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch"
-- Jack Nicholson


I like your tag line a lot.
I have never made steak tartar.. only snatched bits of freshly ground
beef nailed it with some salt and popped it in my mouth while preparing
burgers and such for others.
Do you grind your cut of beef in a meat grinder or do you chop it by
hand, or in a food processor. I know I have a hand crank meat grinder
around here but I just can't seem to find it.
How long and at what temp (300 perhaps) would you cook such a thin cut
of beef to turn it into a pot roast. Do you cook it till it falls apart
like pulled pork or can you carve it like pot roast?

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Old 09-06-2006, 03:39 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default seeking advice on best method for preparing "top round steak"

Meg wrote:
I just sucumbed to the low price on two nice looking pieces of top
round steak each cut about 1.5" thick, very lean, with a moderate
amount of fat trimming the edges. In the past I often asked the
butcher to grind this cut because I do enjoy it as a hamburger or in a
meatloaf. The butcher was no longer on duty so I decided to take the
steaks home and cut it into cubes to be used in the preparation of beef
stew.
I am new to this group and I thought it would be fun to get some new
ideas about how to prepare this cut of beef. I find it to be too tough
a cut to either pan fry or broil but I am interested in what others
have prepared with success.
Thanks



Celebrate its toughness by making beef jerky.

Best regards,
Bob
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Old 09-06-2006, 03:39 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default seeking advice on best method for preparing "top round steak"

In article . com,
"Meg" wrote:

OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
In article . com,
"Meg" wrote:

I just sucumbed to the low price on two nice looking pieces of top
round steak each cut about 1.5" thick, very lean, with a moderate
amount of fat trimming the edges. In the past I often asked the
butcher to grind this cut because I do enjoy it as a hamburger or in a
meatloaf. The butcher was no longer on duty so I decided to take the
steaks home and cut it into cubes to be used in the preparation of beef
stew.
I am new to this group and I thought it would be fun to get some new
ideas about how to prepare this cut of beef. I find it to be too tough
a cut to either pan fry or broil but I am interested in what others
have prepared with success.
Thanks


Raw, Tartar.

Seriously......

I use only top or trimmed bottom round to make steak tartar.
It's amazingly tender if uncooked.

Otherwise, I'd use it to make pot roast. Long, slow cooking will also
tenderize it. Crock pot or braise.
--
Peace!
Om

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch"
-- Jack Nicholson


I like your tag line a lot.
I have never made steak tartar.. only snatched bits of freshly ground
beef nailed it with some salt and popped it in my mouth while preparing
burgers and such for others.


We learned to do that when we were just little kids learning to cook. :-)
I still do it.

Do you grind your cut of beef in a meat grinder or do you chop it by
hand, or in a food processor.


I slice mine by hand using a chinese cleaver as it holds an edge better
than any knife in my drawer. I also keep the pieces fairly large as
that's how I prefer it. Usually about 1/2" cubes.

I'd post a pic but tinypic is down right now, but it's on the home page
of the RFC website, the pic on the far right. :-)

I know I have a hand crank meat grinder
around here but I just can't seem to find it.


You really don't ned it... g

How long and at what temp (300 perhaps) would you cook such a thin cut
of beef to turn it into a pot roast. Do you cook it till it falls apart
like pulled pork or can you carve it like pot roast?


With pot roast, I usually do a long, slow braise on medium-low heat on
the stove top in a cast iron pot. I cook it until it falls apart along
with the usual veggies and flavorings. :-)

Usually an hour or so is long enough depending on the size of the roast.
--
Peace!
Om

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch"
-- Jack Nicholson
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Old 09-06-2006, 03:44 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default seeking advice on best method for preparing "top round steak"


"Meg" wrote in message
ups.com...
I just sucumbed to the low price on two nice looking pieces of top
round steak each cut about 1.5" thick, very lean, with a moderate
amount of fat trimming the edges. In the past I often asked the
butcher to grind this cut because I do enjoy it as a hamburger or in a
meatloaf. The butcher was no longer on duty so I decided to take the
steaks home and cut it into cubes to be used in the preparation of beef
stew.
I am new to this group and I thought it would be fun to get some new
ideas about how to prepare this cut of beef. I find it to be too tough
a cut to either pan fry or broil but I am interested in what others
have prepared with success.
Thanks


Round steak is great for long slow methods of cooking since it has great flavor, but
little fat to tenderize it. Try this:
lightly dredge the steaks in seasoned flour (salt, pepper, whatever else sounds good
to you). Brown on both sides in a mixture of butter and olive oil (1-2 Tbsp each,
depending on the number of steaks). Add beef stock to about 3/4 of the way up the
sides of the steaks and put a lid on. Reduce heat to med-low and simmer until the
meat is fork tender. It takes some time, and you may have to use the low setting
depending on your stove/cooktop. Taste for seasoning, I always end up adding more
pepper. The sauce thickens on it's own, and it's a tasty and not very labor intensive
dinner when paired with some yukon golds and green beans.

kimberly


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Old 09-06-2006, 06:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default seeking advice on best method for preparing "top round steak"


Meg wrote:
I am new to this group and I thought it would be fun to get some new
ideas about how to prepare this cut of beef. I find it to be too tough
a cut to either pan fry or broil but I am interested in what others
have prepared with success.
Thanks


Chili (which is basically beef stew with chili gravy).

Fajitas.

Chopped and mixed into browned mushrooms and caramelized onions to go
with scrambled eggs.

Pounded senseless for chicken-fried steak.

--Blair



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Old 09-06-2006, 06:17 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default seeking advice on best method for preparing "top round steak"

On 9 Jun 2006 10:03:02 -0700, "Blair P. Houghton"
wrote:


Meg wrote:
I am new to this group and I thought it would be fun to get some new
ideas about how to prepare this cut of beef.


Chili (which is basically beef stew with chili gravy).

Fajitas.

Chopped and mixed into browned mushrooms and caramelized onions to go
with scrambled eggs.

Pounded senseless for chicken-fried steak.


Swiss Steak

Christine


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