Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 26-12-2005, 09:11 AM posted to rec.food.baking
-L.
 
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Default 2-layer sheet cake?

Is it structurally possible to make a double layer sheet cake from two
9X13 cakes? Any tips on how to transfer the second layer without it
falling apart in the process?

TIA!
-L.


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Old 26-12-2005, 12:47 PM posted to rec.food.baking
chembake
 
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Default 2-layer sheet cake?

One of the easy way is to cut one layer in vertically in half and place
it two pieces instead of one. Anyway when assembled and frosted it
will look like onegrin.

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Old 26-12-2005, 05:22 PM posted to rec.food.baking
Vox Humana
 
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Default 2-layer sheet cake?


"-L." wrote in message
oups.com...
Is it structurally possible to make a double layer sheet cake from two
9X13 cakes? Any tips on how to transfer the second layer without it
falling apart in the process?


Yes, it is possible. I place the top cake on a cardboard cake board or a
rimless cookie sheet. Position the cake where you want it and slide the
board out from under the cake.


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Old 27-12-2005, 02:22 AM posted to rec.food.baking
King's Crown
 
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Default 2-layer sheet cake?

I cut a 9X13 horizontally and fill with frosting. I used the cooling rack
and slid the top half back on. I slid one edge to over lap the cooling
rack. Touched it down on the frosted cake then slid the rack out while
lightly holding the edge that was touch down and it went on perfectly.

Lynne

"-L." wrote in message
oups.com...
Is it structurally possible to make a double layer sheet cake from two
9X13 cakes? Any tips on how to transfer the second layer without it
falling apart in the process?

TIA!
-L.



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Old 28-12-2005, 09:03 AM posted to rec.food.baking
 
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Default 2-layer sheet cake?

(pausing while I seek English translation.)



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Old 29-12-2005, 06:24 AM posted to rec.food.baking
 
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Default 2-layer sheet cake?


-L. wrote:
Is it structurally possible to make a double layer sheet cake from two
9X13 cakes? Any tips on how to transfer the second layer without it
falling apart in the process?

TIA!
-L.


The ideas given are all good but why not just put your first cake on
what ever you are using as a cake board/plate, ice the top of it and
then dump the 2nd cake directly from the pan on top of the first, after
leveling off the top of the 2nd cake. This is the way most people
would do a 2 layer cake of any size/shape.

Oleta

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Old 29-12-2005, 12:00 PM posted to rec.food.baking
Ward Abbott
 
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Default 2-layer sheet cake?

On 28 Dec 2005 23:34:55 -0800, "-L." wrote:

Thanks everyone for the suggestions. My biggest fear when I dump or
flip it is that it will break apart. Guess I just need a little
practice.


Place your first cake upside down...that way you will have a perfectly
flat "top". Frost as usual filling any gaps at the bottom.

For your second layer...chill it for 15 minutes in the freezer. It
will be firm but not frozen. Then place the top layer on up side
down again, so you will have a flat top also. Hope this helps.


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Old 29-12-2005, 05:36 PM posted to rec.food.baking
Vox Humana
 
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Default 2-layer sheet cake?


"-L." wrote in message
ups.com...


Thanks everyone for the suggestions. My biggest fear when I dump or
flip it is that it will break apart. Guess I just need a little
practice. I will be making a cake that looks like the ocean and
then placing some 2" Nemo figures on it for my son's 2nd birthday. If
it turns out cute, I will post pics.
-L.


There is always a chance that the cake will break. That's why god made
icing. I bet that anyone who makes large cakes has had that happen. It
happened to me once on a 16" layer of a wedding cake. You just have to go
with it. Icing is the great equalizer. No one knew that the layer broke
into three pieces. With practice you will be slapping layers around with
abandon.


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Old 29-12-2005, 06:47 PM posted to rec.food.baking
.
 
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Default 2-layer sheet cake?

On Mon, 26 Dec 2005, -L. wrote:

Is it structurally possible to make a double layer sheet cake from two
9X13 cakes? Any tips on how to transfer the second layer without it
falling apart in the process?


I've used a combination of the two answers I've seen. I'll put the top
layer on a flat sheet (no edges at all) then stick it in the freezer for
15 minutes. I can then slide the top layer off the sheet and onto the
bottom layer. The sheets I use are non-stick. I never use them to bake on;
they are just for the purpose of sliding things around.

--
Send e-mail to: darrell dot grainger at utoronto dot ca



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Old 29-12-2005, 06:55 PM posted to rec.food.baking
.
 
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Default 2-layer sheet cake?

On Thu, 29 Dec 2005, Ward Abbott wrote:

On 28 Dec 2005 23:34:55 -0800, "-L." wrote:

Thanks everyone for the suggestions. My biggest fear when I dump or
flip it is that it will break apart. Guess I just need a little
practice.


Place your first cake upside down...that way you will have a perfectly
flat "top". Frost as usual filling any gaps at the bottom.

For your second layer...chill it for 15 minutes in the freezer. It
will be firm but not frozen. Then place the top layer on up side
down again, so you will have a flat top also. Hope this helps.


Two things I've learned. First, if you have nice thick pans, you tend to
get less doming on your cakes. Second, if you don't level the cake and use
frosting/filling to compensate, some pieces will have very little filling
and others will have too much. I prefer to use a cake level and get a more
consistent filling. Plus you can eat the cuttings and see how your cake
turned out. 8^)

--
Send e-mail to: darrell dot grainger at utoronto dot ca

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Old 08-01-2006, 04:22 PM posted to rec.food.baking
Melba's Jammin'
 
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Default 2-layer sheet cake?

In article .com,
"-L." wrote:

Is it structurally possible to make a double layer sheet cake from two
9X13 cakes? Any tips on how to transfer the second layer without it
falling apart in the process?

TIA!
-L.


Absolutely. Cool both layers completely, out of the pan, on a wire
rack. They should be quite firm when cold. Fill them with the bottoms
together; i.e., put the bottom layer top side down on your cake board or
serving tray, spread filling, and put the top layer top side up on top
of the filling.
--
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 1-3-2006, Sam I Am! and Hello!
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Old 11-01-2006, 09:33 PM posted to rec.food.baking
bre903
 
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Default 2-layer sheet cake?

I use a long cutting board push from one side line up your layers and push
slowely. mine line up perfect every time. Just remember slowely.



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