Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 07-03-2004, 02:07 PM
N.
 
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Default Questions about converting cake recipe for sheet cake, etc.

These questions may seem like a no-brainer to some of you, but I'm not
a baker by any stretch of the imagination so I need help!

I have a recipe for a cake that recommends using two 10x3" round pans
and yields 9 cups of batter. How much of this cake batter would I
need to fill a 11x15x2" rectangular pan? I guess I would fill it up
1/2 way and then bake until it's set in the center and hope for the
best? Would the edges be overbaked by the time the center was set?
Can I prevent this from happening? Is there any way possible that I
can still follow the recipe as is and make 2 sheet cake layers out of
it so I can use a filling (whipped cream type of filling) and still
have it coming out tasty (not dry, crumbly, etc)?

Also, the key in the back of the cookbook says that a 10" round
layered cake will yield 25 servings - does this sound about right? My
daughter is having a birthday party and so I'll need at least 25
servings for kids + adults.

Thanks!

N.

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Old 07-03-2004, 02:28 PM
Scott Danzig
 
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Default Questions about converting cake recipe for sheet cake, etc.

Well, I don't have too much cake baking experience, but this might help a
little:

Max volume capacity of the two round pans:
2 * pi*radius squared*height = 471.23888 cubic inches

Max volume capacity of the rectangular pan:
11 * 15 * 2 = 330 cubic inches

330 / 471.23888 = 0.70
So my estimate is that you'd need 70% of the batter. I'm not sure about the
issues with overcooking the edges.

- Scott

"N." wrote in message
om...
These questions may seem like a no-brainer to some of you, but I'm not
a baker by any stretch of the imagination so I need help!

I have a recipe for a cake that recommends using two 10x3" round pans
and yields 9 cups of batter. How much of this cake batter would I
need to fill a 11x15x2" rectangular pan? I guess I would fill it up
1/2 way and then bake until it's set in the center and hope for the
best? Would the edges be overbaked by the time the center was set?
Can I prevent this from happening? Is there any way possible that I
can still follow the recipe as is and make 2 sheet cake layers out of
it so I can use a filling (whipped cream type of filling) and still
have it coming out tasty (not dry, crumbly, etc)?

Also, the key in the back of the cookbook says that a 10" round
layered cake will yield 25 servings - does this sound about right? My
daughter is having a birthday party and so I'll need at least 25
servings for kids + adults.

Thanks!

N.



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Old 07-03-2004, 04:48 PM
Jessica Vincent
 
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Default Questions about converting cake recipe for sheet cake, etc.


"N." wrote in message
om...
These questions may seem like a no-brainer to some of you, but I'm not
a baker by any stretch of the imagination so I need help!

I have a recipe for a cake that recommends using two 10x3" round pans
and yields 9 cups of batter. How much of this cake batter would I
need to fill a 11x15x2" rectangular pan? I guess I would fill it up
1/2 way and then bake until it's set in the center and hope for the
best? Would the edges be overbaked by the time the center was set?
Can I prevent this from happening? Is there any way possible that I
can still follow the recipe as is and make 2 sheet cake layers out of
it so I can use a filling (whipped cream type of filling) and still
have it coming out tasty (not dry, crumbly, etc)?

Also, the key in the back of the cookbook says that a 10" round
layered cake will yield 25 servings - does this sound about right? My
daughter is having a birthday party and so I'll need at least 25
servings for kids + adults.

Thanks!

N.


The volume question has already been answered....

I've baked many a cake in a 9 X 13 pan where the recipe called for the use
of two round 9" layers. It usually takes an extra ten to fifteen minutes to
bake, but I have never had a problem with the edges overbrowning, or the
cake being dry or crumbly. With exceptions being the rare occasion that I
have used pyrex and failed to reduce the oven temp by 25 degrees.

Jessica


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Old 07-03-2004, 11:01 PM
Françoise
 
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Default Questions about converting cake recipe for sheet cake, etc.

N,

An 11x15x2" rectangular pan is usually used to make a roll cake. It is
cook at a higher temperature and is a thin cake. I would not make a
birthday cake in such a size pan. As Jessica, I have baked with success,
in 9X13=94 pans very often, a recipe asking for 2 9=94 pans. The temperat=
ure
is the same but the cooking time is around 5 minutes more.

If the children are very young 4 -5 years old, and you are serving a meal=

before, one recipe may be enough. But if the children are older and you
are serving only the cake, you need 2. If they are teenagers, even after =
a
meal you need 2. Making 2 would permit to make the filling you want to
make. If some is left over, you can eat it the following days or freeze i=
t
for the next occasion.

A 9X13=94 pan is a good size for a birthday cake. It gives us lots of spa=
ce
for decorations.

Good luck,

Fran=E7oise.

"N." wrote:

These questions may seem like a no-brainer to some of you, but I'm not
a baker by any stretch of the imagination so I need help!

I have a recipe for a cake that recommends using two 10x3" round pans
and yields 9 cups of batter. How much of this cake batter would I
need to fill a 11x15x2" rectangular pan? I guess I would fill it up
1/2 way and then bake until it's set in the center and hope for the
best? Would the edges be overbaked by the time the center was set?
Can I prevent this from happening? Is there any way possible that I
can still follow the recipe as is and make 2 sheet cake layers out of
it so I can use a filling (whipped cream type of filling) and still
have it coming out tasty (not dry, crumbly, etc)?

Also, the key in the back of the cookbook says that a 10" round
layered cake will yield 25 servings - does this sound about right? My
daughter is having a birthday party and so I'll need at least 25
servings for kids + adults.

Thanks!

N.


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Old 08-03-2004, 04:39 PM
Darrell Grainger
 
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Default Questions about converting cake recipe for sheet cake, etc.

On Sun, 7 Mar 2004, N. wrote:

These questions may seem like a no-brainer to some of you, but I'm not
a baker by any stretch of the imagination so I need help!


I'm very much an amateur at this too. You need to take this with the
understanding that I'm working on trial and error most the time. 8^)

I have a recipe for a cake that recommends using two 10x3" round pans
and yields 9 cups of batter. How much of this cake batter would I
need to fill a 11x15x2" rectangular pan? I guess I would fill it up
1/2 way and then bake until it's set in the center and hope for the
best? Would the edges be overbaked by the time the center was set?
Can I prevent this from happening? Is there any way possible that I
can still follow the recipe as is and make 2 sheet cake layers out of
it so I can use a filling (whipped cream type of filling) and still
have it coming out tasty (not dry, crumbly, etc)?


I have recently started making cakes for large groups. I take recipes I
know work for 8" or 9" rounds and convert them to half sheets or large
pans like an 11x15".

My thinking, and this is were I'm guessing, is that the batter should be
the same depth. So if the batter in a 10" round is actually 1.5" deep then
I'd want it to be 1.5" deep in the 11x15". To keep the same depth I just
need to figure out the surface areas for the two pans and multiple as
necessary. So the area for a circle is PI*r*r. The math would then be:

two 10" rounds = 2 * 3.14159 * 5 * 5 = 157 units.

The surface area for the 11x15" is simply 11 * 15 or 165. I would guess
that you need 1.05 times the original recipe. You might be able to get
away with just using the original recipe.

Mind you, I seem to be lucky thus far. I've never read anywhere that this
works but it has for me so far. The problem you might have is that the
recipe calls for 3" high pans. Maybe the 2" high 11x15" is not high
enough. I've been in the habit of buying all my pans 3" high so I've never
had to worry about that.

Additionally, the recipes I use list instructions for converting to square
pans as well. Some recipes might not scale to square pans because the heat
from the sides is just as important as the heat from the bottom/top.

Also, the key in the back of the cookbook says that a 10" round
layered cake will yield 25 servings - does this sound about right? My
daughter is having a birthday party and so I'll need at least 25
servings for kids + adults.


If the recipe for the two 10" rounds will yield 25 servings then the
single 11x15" pan should serve just as much. Assuming the 10" round is two
layers, you'll want to cut the 11x15" in half and layer it. This will make
a 11x7.5" or 5.5x15" cake (I'd go the first route). I served 3x3" pieces
of two layer cake. People took it home. Couples shared one and took the
other piece home. There was a LOT of left over. Cutting the 11x7.5 into 25
pieces you are looking at approximately 2x1.5" piece of cake. That should
be plenty.

Mind you, if you are like me I'd double the recipe, make two 11x15" cakes
and create a 11x15" layer cake. I'd encourage people to take the extra
home and bring the rest to work for my staff. 8^)

--
Send e-mail to: darrell at cs dot toronto dot edu
Don't send e-mail to


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Old 08-03-2004, 11:56 PM
Nexis
 
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Default Questions about converting cake recipe for sheet cake, etc.


"N." wrote in message
om...
These questions may seem like a no-brainer to some of you, but I'm not
a baker by any stretch of the imagination so I need help!

I have a recipe for a cake that recommends using two 10x3" round pans
and yields 9 cups of batter. How much of this cake batter would I
need to fill a 11x15x2" rectangular pan? I guess I would fill it up
1/2 way and then bake until it's set in the center and hope for the
best? Would the edges be overbaked by the time the center was set?
Can I prevent this from happening? Is there any way possible that I
can still follow the recipe as is and make 2 sheet cake layers out of
it so I can use a filling (whipped cream type of filling) and still
have it coming out tasty (not dry, crumbly, etc)?

Also, the key in the back of the cookbook says that a 10" round
layered cake will yield 25 servings - does this sound about right? My
daughter is having a birthday party and so I'll need at least 25
servings for kids + adults.

Thanks!

N.


Why not just use a recipe meant for the pan you're using? With that size
pan, you will get a thin cake. If it were me, I'd make a recipe like
Hershey's Deep Dark Chocolate or Black Magic cake. Then, I'd make it again.
Put some filling, say sliced strawberries and whipped cream, in the center
and layer them. Now you have plenty for 25+ people, and no worries. It's the
simplest, moistest cake ever, no matter what I bake it in. I've done rounds,
springform, 9x13, 11x15, etc. Just remember it will be done much quicker in
the 11x15, so start checking at around 15-18 minutes.

kimberly


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Old 09-03-2004, 02:34 PM
N.
 
Posts: n/a
Default Questions about converting cake recipe for sheet cake, etc.

Wow, thanks for the advice, everyone!

I wanted to use the recipe that I have because I've tried it before
and it's delicious. While I'd be open to using a different recipe, I
wanted something buttery (made with butter, that is...) too - can I
substitute melted butter for the vegetable oil in the Hershey's
recipe?

N.

"Nexis" wrote in message news:[email protected]

Why not just use a recipe meant for the pan you're using? With that size
pan, you will get a thin cake. If it were me, I'd make a recipe like
Hershey's Deep Dark Chocolate or Black Magic cake. Then, I'd make it again.
Put some filling, say sliced strawberries and whipped cream, in the center
and layer them. Now you have plenty for 25+ people, and no worries. It's the
simplest, moistest cake ever, no matter what I bake it in. I've done rounds,
springform, 9x13, 11x15, etc. Just remember it will be done much quicker in
the 11x15, so start checking at around 15-18 minutes.

kimberly

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Old 12-03-2004, 12:49 AM
Nexis
 
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Default Questions about converting cake recipe for sheet cake, etc.


"N." wrote in message
om...
Wow, thanks for the advice, everyone!

I wanted to use the recipe that I have because I've tried it before
and it's delicious. While I'd be open to using a different recipe, I
wanted something buttery (made with butter, that is...) too - can I
substitute melted butter for the vegetable oil in the Hershey's
recipe?

N.


I would stick with the recipe, and make a buttercream to frost it. Buttery
flavor, but still a dense, moist, richly chocolate cake.

Care to post your recipe?

kimberly


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Old 15-03-2004, 06:19 PM
N.
 
Posts: n/a
Default Questions about converting cake recipe for sheet cake, etc.

Kimberly,

Thank you so much for the tip the Hershey's cake - the entire cake
was a big hit! People were asking me (jokingly, I hope - cake making
is incredibly time-consuming!) to make all of their kids' birthday
cakes from now on. I did use the 11x15 pan and watched it carefully,
made 2 layers, used a whipped cream/oreo cookie filling and the
buttercream. Oh my. It was sublime. Didn't miss the butter in the
cake at all, lol. I think that will be the cake to beat all cakes.

The recipe that I have for the butter cake (also the oreo filling and
buttercream recipes) is from the cake book, The Whimsical Bakehouse by
Kaye and Liv Hansen. Delicious and fun!

Thanks again,

N.

"Nexis" wrote in message news:[email protected]


I would stick with the recipe, and make a buttercream to frost it. Buttery
flavor, but still a dense, moist, richly chocolate cake.

Care to post your recipe?

kimberly



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