Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 24-11-2005, 05:10 PM posted to rec.food.baking
Geoman1
 
Posts: n/a
Default Meringue questions

I have a few questions if I may.

I obtained my Great Grandmothers recipe for a meringue cake, and I wish to
modify it or at least understand it.

Allow me to put the recipe on here and then critique it.

1 Cup egg whites
Beat until firm
Add 2 cups sugar
Add 1 TBLS of Vanilla
Add 1 TBLS of Vinegar
Put into butter coated pans and cook like cake at 350F for one hour. Layer
with whip cream just like a cake, chill and serve with sweetened
strawberries or another fruit.

I LOVE this recipe, but left overs weep a lot in the refrigerator and I wish
to obtain a thicker cake, it shrinks and doesn't have a great amount of cake
afterwards.

Here are some questions I pose for educational discussion.

1. I tried Cream of Tartar, I used one to one ratio to Vinegar. The cake
tasted like a dry wine! Acid taste and feeling. I reduced to 1 teaspoon
instead of the tablespoon and it seemed to be the same as the vinegar. Is
the ratio for eggs less with Cream of Tartar? I figured it was about 1/8
tsp to one egg white.

2. I beat the eggs till firm and dry and let them warm up to room
temperature, not using any plastic and everything is clean. But why the
shrinkage?

3. I powdered my sugar and also used granular sugar. Both had the same
results. I measured out the two cups and THEN powdered it and came out with
about 3-3/4 cups. Is this the correct way to do this?

4. What will increasing or decreasing the sugar amounts do to a meringue?
This is a real mind bender to me.

5. How can I double the amount of volume of the cake? Would doubling the
portions per pan do this or will it just shrink anyway?

Thanks everyone, I guess I'm looking for scientific reasons for things that
explain the reasons for things.

BTW, why no salt in this recipe? Doesn't salt do something chemically?

Thanks again

Rich



  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 24-11-2005, 06:03 PM posted to rec.food.baking
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default Meringue questions


"Geoman1" Geo1 wrote in message
...
I have a few questions if I may.

I obtained my Great Grandmothers recipe for a meringue cake, and I wish to
modify it or at least understand it.

Allow me to put the recipe on here and then critique it.

1 Cup egg whites
Beat until firm
Add 2 cups sugar
Add 1 TBLS of Vanilla
Add 1 TBLS of Vinegar
Put into butter coated pans and cook like cake at 350F for one hour. Layer
with whip cream just like a cake, chill and serve with sweetened
strawberries or another fruit.

I LOVE this recipe, but left overs weep a lot in the refrigerator and I

wish
to obtain a thicker cake, it shrinks and doesn't have a great amount of

cake
afterwards.

Here are some questions I pose for educational discussion.

1. I tried Cream of Tartar, I used one to one ratio to Vinegar. The cake
tasted like a dry wine! Acid taste and feeling. I reduced to 1 teaspoon
instead of the tablespoon and it seemed to be the same as the vinegar. Is
the ratio for eggs less with Cream of Tartar? I figured it was about 1/8
tsp to one egg white.

2. I beat the eggs till firm and dry and let them warm up to room
temperature, not using any plastic and everything is clean. But why the
shrinkage?

3. I powdered my sugar and also used granular sugar. Both had the same
results. I measured out the two cups and THEN powdered it and came out

with
about 3-3/4 cups. Is this the correct way to do this?

4. What will increasing or decreasing the sugar amounts do to a meringue?
This is a real mind bender to me.

5. How can I double the amount of volume of the cake? Would doubling the
portions per pan do this or will it just shrink anyway?

Thanks everyone, I guess I'm looking for scientific reasons for things

that
explain the reasons for things.

BTW, why no salt in this recipe? Doesn't salt do something chemically?

Thanks again


I think there is a problem with the method listed.

First, I would separate the eggs while they are cold and make sure that you
avoid even a speck of yolk. Use very clean glass or stainless equipment. I
like to warm the whites to get maximum volume. You can do this by very
carefully heating them on the stove while whisking or over a pan or
simmering water. I would use about a teaspoon of cream of tartar. I start
by whisking by hand over heat until a foam forms and then move to the stand
mixer. You can do it all by hand, but it is hard to get good volume unless
you are in good shape.

After the soft foam forms, start very slowly adding the sugar - a couple
tablespoons at a time. Continue whisking until the sugar is dissolved and
then add more. Finally, add the vanilla. To get a stable foam, you can't
add the sugar too soon or too fast.

After all the sugar is incorporated you should have a shiny foam that forms
a peak that doesn't curl-over. If you continue to beat, the foam will lose
its shine and the volume will decrease. It will also tend to weep after it
is baked.

To review:
1: Separate the eggs avoiding even a speck of yolk
2: Use only immaculately clean glass or stainless equipment.
3: Warm the whites with the cream of tartar, beating to a soft foam
4: Move to a stand mixer on a medium high speed, or continue by hand adding
the sugar very slowly
5: Add the vanilla
6: Stop beating when the foam is glossy and stiff peaks form. It is better
to under-beat when in doubt.

A weak foam will weep liquid underneath and form beads on the surface. Warm
white achieve a larger volume. Over-beating wakens the foam and reduces
volume. Adding the sugar too soon or too fast weakens the foam.

I would also think that the foam would go sticky in the refrigerator. It
seems like something that needs to be assembled just before it is eaten.

You can only get a set volume from the eggs. Forget about doubling it. You
can only dissolve a set amount of sugar in the whites. One cup seems about
right. I wouldn't add more. The acid- either vinegar or cream of tartar,
is an aid to stabilize the foam. You don't strictly need it, but it is an
insurance policy. An alternative would be to use a copper bowl. You can add
a bit of salt for flavor, but too much salt will destabilize the foam.I
wouldn't add more than 1/4 teaspoon and only if you think you really need
it - and only after you have made the cake a few times successfully without
the salt.



  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-12-2005, 02:49 AM posted to rec.food.baking
Geoman1
 
Posts: n/a
Default Meringue questions


"Vox Humana" wrote in message
. ..

"Geoman1" Geo1 wrote in message
...
I have a few questions if I may.

I obtained my Great Grandmothers recipe for a meringue cake, and I wish
to
modify it or at least understand it.

Allow me to put the recipe on here and then critique it.

1 Cup egg whites
Beat until firm
Add 2 cups sugar
Add 1 TBLS of Vanilla
Add 1 TBLS of Vinegar
Put into butter coated pans and cook like cake at 350F for one hour.
Layer
with whip cream just like a cake, chill and serve with sweetened
strawberries or another fruit.

I LOVE this recipe, but left overs weep a lot in the refrigerator and I

wish
to obtain a thicker cake, it shrinks and doesn't have a great amount of

cake
afterwards.

Here are some questions I pose for educational discussion.

1. I tried Cream of Tartar, I used one to one ratio to Vinegar. The cake
tasted like a dry wine! Acid taste and feeling. I reduced to 1 teaspoon
instead of the tablespoon and it seemed to be the same as the vinegar. Is
the ratio for eggs less with Cream of Tartar? I figured it was about 1/8
tsp to one egg white.

2. I beat the eggs till firm and dry and let them warm up to room
temperature, not using any plastic and everything is clean. But why the
shrinkage?

3. I powdered my sugar and also used granular sugar. Both had the same
results. I measured out the two cups and THEN powdered it and came out

with
about 3-3/4 cups. Is this the correct way to do this?

4. What will increasing or decreasing the sugar amounts do to a meringue?
This is a real mind bender to me.

5. How can I double the amount of volume of the cake? Would doubling the
portions per pan do this or will it just shrink anyway?

Thanks everyone, I guess I'm looking for scientific reasons for things

that
explain the reasons for things.

BTW, why no salt in this recipe? Doesn't salt do something chemically?

Thanks again


I think there is a problem with the method listed.

First, I would separate the eggs while they are cold and make sure that
you
avoid even a speck of yolk. Use very clean glass or stainless equipment.
I
like to warm the whites to get maximum volume. You can do this by very
carefully heating them on the stove while whisking or over a pan or
simmering water. I would use about a teaspoon of cream of tartar. I
start
by whisking by hand over heat until a foam forms and then move to the
stand
mixer. You can do it all by hand, but it is hard to get good volume
unless
you are in good shape.

After the soft foam forms, start very slowly adding the sugar - a couple
tablespoons at a time. Continue whisking until the sugar is dissolved and
then add more. Finally, add the vanilla. To get a stable foam, you can't
add the sugar too soon or too fast.

After all the sugar is incorporated you should have a shiny foam that
forms
a peak that doesn't curl-over. If you continue to beat, the foam will
lose
its shine and the volume will decrease. It will also tend to weep after
it
is baked.

To review:
1: Separate the eggs avoiding even a speck of yolk
2: Use only immaculately clean glass or stainless equipment.
3: Warm the whites with the cream of tartar, beating to a soft foam
4: Move to a stand mixer on a medium high speed, or continue by hand
adding
the sugar very slowly
5: Add the vanilla
6: Stop beating when the foam is glossy and stiff peaks form. It is
better
to under-beat when in doubt.

A weak foam will weep liquid underneath and form beads on the surface.
Warm
white achieve a larger volume. Over-beating wakens the foam and reduces
volume. Adding the sugar too soon or too fast weakens the foam.

I would also think that the foam would go sticky in the refrigerator. It
seems like something that needs to be assembled just before it is eaten.

You can only get a set volume from the eggs. Forget about doubling it.
You
can only dissolve a set amount of sugar in the whites. One cup seems
about
right. I wouldn't add more. The acid- either vinegar or cream of tartar,
is an aid to stabilize the foam. You don't strictly need it, but it is an
insurance policy. An alternative would be to use a copper bowl. You can
add
a bit of salt for flavor, but too much salt will destabilize the foam.I
wouldn't add more than 1/4 teaspoon and only if you think you really need
it - and only after you have made the cake a few times successfully
without
the salt.


I'm continually amazed at the rules concerning egg whites!

These are very helpful and informative suggestions, I will try the whipping
over the stove but its a flat electric type and I don't want to scratch it
:-)

We also have the kichenaid mixer, I wonder if there are copper bowls for
that? Also, maybe its me, but I honestly think the egg whites beeted better
with the old two beater type table blender my mother and grandmother use to
use. I don't think I get the volume with that kitchenaid with one beater.
Any others with a comment concerning this?

Thanks Vox for the great response.

Rich


  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-12-2005, 04:50 PM posted to rec.food.baking
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default Meringue questions


"Geoman1" Geo1 wrote in message
...

We also have the kichenaid mixer, I wonder if there are copper bowls for
that? Also, maybe its me, but I honestly think the egg whites beeted

better
with the old two beater type table blender my mother and grandmother use

to
use. I don't think I get the volume with that kitchenaid with one beater.
Any others with a comment concerning this?

Thanks Vox for the great response.


There are copper bowl inserts available for the KA stand mixer. I get such
great results just using the SS bowl and whisk that I can't see buying the
copper insert. As I said, I put the whites and cream of tartar (or lemon
juice or vinegar) in the bowl, set it over the flame, and whisk like mad
until a soft foam has formed and the eggs are very warm. I move the bowl to
the mixer, turn it to medium high, and start adding the sugar. A stiff foam
forms in a couple of minutes.


  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-12-2005, 07:12 PM posted to rec.food.baking
Geoman1
 
Posts: n/a
Default Meringue questions


"Vox Humana" wrote in message
news

"Geoman1" Geo1 wrote in message
...

We also have the kichenaid mixer, I wonder if there are copper bowls for
that? Also, maybe its me, but I honestly think the egg whites beeted

better
with the old two beater type table blender my mother and grandmother use

to
use. I don't think I get the volume with that kitchenaid with one beater.
Any others with a comment concerning this?

Thanks Vox for the great response.


There are copper bowl inserts available for the KA stand mixer. I get
such
great results just using the SS bowl and whisk that I can't see buying the
copper insert. As I said, I put the whites and cream of tartar (or lemon
juice or vinegar) in the bowl, set it over the flame, and whisk like mad
until a soft foam has formed and the eggs are very warm. I move the bowl
to
the mixer, turn it to medium high, and start adding the sugar. A stiff
foam
forms in a couple of minutes.

Thanks for the more detailed information, Vox, I will certainly try this the
next time I make this pudding~

I'm Gratefull that you share your experience with us.
Rich






Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
After the Deletion of Google Answers U Got Questions Fills the Gap Answering and Asking the Tough Questions Linux Flash Drives General Cooking 0 07-05-2007 06:38 PM
Meringue help [email protected] General Cooking 13 07-07-2006 11:58 PM
meringue cookies and almond meringue cookies Bob (this one) General Cooking 3 19-12-2005 01:43 PM
Meringue Pie with Jam cmo Recipes 0 31-12-2004 06:31 PM
Questions about a Meringue pie Alexis Siefert General Cooking 1 13-10-2004 12:00 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:54 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017