Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 03-09-2005, 07:05 PM
Chuck
 
Posts: n/a
Default Adjusting bake times-temps for cheesecake

Anyone have any web sites or tables for adjusting cheesecake bake
times or temps when using a recipe for a 10 spring form ,, in a 5 or 8
inch spring form? Where to start?
Also,, of all the cooking newsgroups.. is there a better one that I
should ask this in?
Thanks
Chuck

  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-09-2005, 08:57 PM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Chuck" wrote in message
...
Anyone have any web sites or tables for adjusting cheesecake bake
times or temps when using a recipe for a 10 spring form ,, in a 5 or 8
inch spring form? Where to start?
Also,, of all the cooking newsgroups.. is there a better one that I
should ask this in?
Thanks
Chuck


Cheesecake is best baked at a low temperature for a long time. Using a
water bath is also helpful. Therefore, I wouldn't change the temperature.
Baking time will be less for the 5 inch cake - maybe 45-50 minutes vs. 60-75
minutes for the larger sizes. The most important thing is to know how to
tell if the cake is done. In your oven it may be significantly different
than in my oven. If this is a one-of, then just check after about 45
minutes and then every 10 minutes thereafter. If you are going to make
these cakes on a regular basis, note the time it took the first few batches.


  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-09-2005, 10:50 PM
Chuck
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sat, 03 Sep 2005 19:57:29 GMT, "Vox Humana"
wrote:


"Chuck" wrote in message
.. .
Anyone have any web sites or tables for adjusting cheesecake bake
times or temps when using a recipe for a 10 spring form ,, in a 5 or 8
inch spring form? Where to start?
Also,, of all the cooking newsgroups.. is there a better one that I
should ask this in?
Thanks
Chuck


Cheesecake is best baked at a low temperature for a long time. Using a
water bath is also helpful. Therefore, I wouldn't change the temperature.


The recipe that I've been using calls for 475 for 12 minutes then 300
for 50 minutes, followed by a cool down routine..

Baking time will be less for the 5 inch cake - maybe 45-50 minutes vs. 60-75
minutes for the larger sizes. The most important thing is to know how to
tell if the cake is done. In your oven it may be significantly different
than in my oven. If this is a one-of, then just check after about 45
minutes and then every 10 minutes thereafter. If you are going to make
these cakes on a regular basis, note the time it took the first few batches.


Ok.. How do I know if my cheesecake is done?
In the past I've just followed the time set forth in the recipe..

  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-09-2005, 10:57 PM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Chuck" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 03 Sep 2005 19:57:29 GMT, "Vox Humana"
wrote:


"Chuck" wrote in message
.. .
Anyone have any web sites or tables for adjusting cheesecake bake
times or temps when using a recipe for a 10 spring form ,, in a 5 or 8
inch spring form? Where to start?
Also,, of all the cooking newsgroups.. is there a better one that I
should ask this in?
Thanks
Chuck


Cheesecake is best baked at a low temperature for a long time. Using a
water bath is also helpful. Therefore, I wouldn't change the

temperature.

The recipe that I've been using calls for 475 for 12 minutes then 300
for 50 minutes, followed by a cool down routine..

Baking time will be less for the 5 inch cake - maybe 45-50 minutes vs.

60-75
minutes for the larger sizes. The most important thing is to know how to
tell if the cake is done. In your oven it may be significantly different
than in my oven. If this is a one-of, then just check after about 45
minutes and then every 10 minutes thereafter. If you are going to make
these cakes on a regular basis, note the time it took the first few

batches.


Ok.. How do I know if my cheesecake is done?
In the past I've just followed the time set forth in the recipe..



I might skip the 475F first step. That seem awfully high to me,
particurally for the small cakes. Afer all, cheesecake is really a custard.
The texture is better if you heat is slowly, thus the water bath. I see no
reason to brown the top. I might go with 325 or 350 in a waterbath for an
hour. Then I generally turn off the oven and let it sit, with the door ajar
for another hour to cool slowly. Your cake is done when the center jiggles
slighty when the pan is shaken. If it is set solid, it is over-done. The
cake will become more solid on cooling. It is best to refrigerate the cake
for several hours before serving.


  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-09-2005, 11:25 PM
Chuck
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sat, 03 Sep 2005 21:57:57 GMT, "Vox Humana"
wrote:


"Chuck" wrote in message
.. .
On Sat, 03 Sep 2005 19:57:29 GMT, "Vox Humana"
wrote:


"Chuck" wrote in message
.. .
Anyone have any web sites or tables for adjusting cheesecake bake
times or temps when using a recipe for a 10 spring form ,, in a 5 or 8
inch spring form? Where to start?
Also,, of all the cooking newsgroups.. is there a better one that I
should ask this in?
Thanks
Chuck

Cheesecake is best baked at a low temperature for a long time. Using a
water bath is also helpful. Therefore, I wouldn't change the

temperature.

The recipe that I've been using calls for 475 for 12 minutes then 300
for 50 minutes, followed by a cool down routine..

Baking time will be less for the 5 inch cake - maybe 45-50 minutes vs.

60-75
minutes for the larger sizes. The most important thing is to know how to
tell if the cake is done. In your oven it may be significantly different
than in my oven. If this is a one-of, then just check after about 45
minutes and then every 10 minutes thereafter. If you are going to make
these cakes on a regular basis, note the time it took the first few

batches.


Ok.. How do I know if my cheesecake is done?
In the past I've just followed the time set forth in the recipe..



I might skip the 475F first step. That seem awfully high to me,
particurally for the small cakes. Afer all, cheesecake is really a custard.
The texture is better if you heat is slowly, thus the water bath. I see no
reason to brown the top. I might go with 325 or 350 in a waterbath for an
hour. Then I generally turn off the oven and let it sit, with the door ajar
for another hour to cool slowly. Your cake is done when the center jiggles
slighty when the pan is shaken. If it is set solid, it is over-done. The
cake will become more solid on cooling. It is best to refrigerate the cake
for several hours before serving.

Thanks.. When it comes to baking I've always been cautious about
deviating from recipe.. I'll try the lower temps.. that would help
with cracking problems that sometimes occur..
Chuck


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-09-2005, 11:45 PM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Chuck" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 03 Sep 2005 21:57:57 GMT, "Vox Humana"
wrote:


"Chuck" wrote in message
.. .
On Sat, 03 Sep 2005 19:57:29 GMT, "Vox Humana"
wrote:


"Chuck" wrote in message
.. .
Anyone have any web sites or tables for adjusting cheesecake bake
times or temps when using a recipe for a 10 spring form ,, in a 5 or

8
inch spring form? Where to start?
Also,, of all the cooking newsgroups.. is there a better one that I
should ask this in?
Thanks
Chuck

Cheesecake is best baked at a low temperature for a long time. Using

a
water bath is also helpful. Therefore, I wouldn't change the

temperature.

The recipe that I've been using calls for 475 for 12 minutes then 300
for 50 minutes, followed by a cool down routine..

Baking time will be less for the 5 inch cake - maybe 45-50 minutes vs.

60-75
minutes for the larger sizes. The most important thing is to know how

to
tell if the cake is done. In your oven it may be significantly

different
than in my oven. If this is a one-of, then just check after about 45
minutes and then every 10 minutes thereafter. If you are going to

make
these cakes on a regular basis, note the time it took the first few

batches.


Ok.. How do I know if my cheesecake is done?
In the past I've just followed the time set forth in the recipe..



I might skip the 475F first step. That seem awfully high to me,
particurally for the small cakes. Afer all, cheesecake is really a

custard.
The texture is better if you heat is slowly, thus the water bath. I see

no
reason to brown the top. I might go with 325 or 350 in a waterbath for

an
hour. Then I generally turn off the oven and let it sit, with the door

ajar
for another hour to cool slowly. Your cake is done when the center

jiggles
slighty when the pan is shaken. If it is set solid, it is over-done.

The
cake will become more solid on cooling. It is best to refrigerate the

cake
for several hours before serving.

Thanks.. When it comes to baking I've always been cautious about
deviating from recipe.. I'll try the lower temps.. that would help
with cracking problems that sometimes occur..
Chuck


To minimize cracking:
bake at a moderate temperature
use a water bath (put boiling water in a large pan and set the foil-covered
baking pan in that
avoid beating a high speed as air causes expansion and cracking
cool slowly in the oven before bringing to room temp
Release the cake from the sides of the pan before refrigerating

If you have a large food processor, use that for the batter as it is
unlikely to aerate the batter.


  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-09-2005, 02:40 AM
Chuck
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sat, 03 Sep 2005 22:45:59 GMT, "Vox Humana"
wrote:


"Chuck" wrote in message
.. .
On Sat, 03 Sep 2005 21:57:57 GMT, "Vox Humana"
wrote:


"Chuck" wrote in message
.. .
On Sat, 03 Sep 2005 19:57:29 GMT, "Vox Humana"
wrote:


"Chuck" wrote in message
.. .
Anyone have any web sites or tables for adjusting cheesecake bake
times or temps when using a recipe for a 10 spring form ,, in a 5 or

8
inch spring form? Where to start?
Also,, of all the cooking newsgroups.. is there a better one that I
should ask this in?
Thanks
Chuck

Cheesecake is best baked at a low temperature for a long time. Using

a
water bath is also helpful. Therefore, I wouldn't change the
temperature.

The recipe that I've been using calls for 475 for 12 minutes then 300
for 50 minutes, followed by a cool down routine..

Baking time will be less for the 5 inch cake - maybe 45-50 minutes vs.
60-75
minutes for the larger sizes. The most important thing is to know how

to
tell if the cake is done. In your oven it may be significantly

different
than in my oven. If this is a one-of, then just check after about 45
minutes and then every 10 minutes thereafter. If you are going to

make
these cakes on a regular basis, note the time it took the first few
batches.


Ok.. How do I know if my cheesecake is done?
In the past I've just followed the time set forth in the recipe..


I might skip the 475F first step. That seem awfully high to me,
particurally for the small cakes. Afer all, cheesecake is really a

custard.
The texture is better if you heat is slowly, thus the water bath. I see

no
reason to brown the top. I might go with 325 or 350 in a waterbath for

an
hour. Then I generally turn off the oven and let it sit, with the door

ajar
for another hour to cool slowly. Your cake is done when the center

jiggles
slighty when the pan is shaken. If it is set solid, it is over-done.

The
cake will become more solid on cooling. It is best to refrigerate the

cake
for several hours before serving.

Thanks.. When it comes to baking I've always been cautious about
deviating from recipe.. I'll try the lower temps.. that would help
with cracking problems that sometimes occur..
Chuck


To minimize cracking:
bake at a moderate temperature
use a water bath (put boiling water in a large pan and set the foil-covered
baking pan in that
avoid beating a high speed as air causes expansion and cracking
cool slowly in the oven before bringing to room temp
Release the cake from the sides of the pan before refrigerating

If you have a large food processor, use that for the batter as it is
unlikely to aerate the batter.

Thanks for the information... I'll try using the tips tomorrow..
The chocolate cheesecake I've been making tastes great, and when it
doesn't crack it looks great... It's just that it's so rich,, a 10
inch cake is enough for 20 people...
So tomorrow it's 2 SMALL cheesecakes and a batch of biscuits!
Chuck
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-09-2005, 04:19 PM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Chuck" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 03 Sep 2005 22:45:59 GMT, "Vox Humana"
wrote:

Thanks for the information... I'll try using the tips tomorrow..
The chocolate cheesecake I've been making tastes great, and when it
doesn't crack it looks great... It's just that it's so rich,, a 10
inch cake is enough for 20 people...
So tomorrow it's 2 SMALL cheesecakes and a batch of biscuits!
Chuck


I have a recipe that never cracks. If you don't want to make the sponge
layer, just use cookie dough, nut, or crumb crust:

----------------
Junior's Cheesecake
Sponge Cake Layer
Preheat oven to 350
Grease a 9 inch springform pan.

1/2 cup sifted cake flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
pinch of salt
3 eggs, separated
1/3 cup sugar plus 2 tablespoons
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3 drops lemon extract
3 tablespoons melted butter
1/4 teaspoon cream of tarter

Sift the flour, baking powder and salt into a medium bowl and set aside.
Beat egg yolks with an electric mixer on high for 3 minutes. Gradually add
the sugar and beat until the mixture is light and lemon colored - about 5
more minutes. Beat in the vanilla and lemon extracts.
Sift the flour mixture over the beaten egg yolks and stir by hand until well
blended. Then blend in the butter.
In a clean bowl with clean beaters, combine the egg whites and cream of
tarter. Beat until foamy and then gradually add the reserved 2 tablespoons
of sugar. Continue beating until the egg whites form stiff peaks.
Combine about of the beaten egg whites with the flour mixture and mix
until well combined. Then gently fold in the remaining egg whites.
Carefully spread the batter on the bottom of the pan and bake for about 10
minutes or until the cake springs back when pressed with your finger. Set
aside to cool.

Cheesecake Layer (Plain)
4 8oz packages of cream cheese (not low fat)
1 2/3 cup sugar
1/4 cup cornstarch
1 tablespoon vanilla
2 eggs
3/4 cup heavy whipping cream

Preheat Oven to 350F
Combined one package of cream cheese, 1/3 cup sugar, and the cornstarch in
the bowl of an electric mixer and beat on low speed until creamy, about 3
minutes.
Add the remaining cream cheese, one package at a time and beat until smooth.
Increase the speed to high and add the remaining sugar and eggs, one at a
time. Beat thoroughly after each addition.
Stop the mixer and blend in the cream and vanilla by hand.
Pour the batter over the baked cake in the springform pan.
Wrap the bottom of the pan with heavy duty foil. Set the foil lined pan in
another slightly larger pan. Pour enough boiling water into the outer pan
to submerge 1 inch of the springform pan.
Bake for about 1 hour or until the center of the cake barely jiggles when it
is shaken. Let the cake cool in the oven for about an hour with the door
ajar. Let the cake cool for another hour outside the oven on a wire rack.
Slide a knife between the cake and the pan and then release the sides of the
pan. Wrap with plastic film and chill in the refrigerator over night.


Pumpkin Cheesecake
1 recipe of sponge layer
1 recipe cheesecake layer

1 cup solid pack pumpkin
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon cloves


Preheat the oven to 350
Mix the pumpkin with the spices and set aside.
Make the cheesecake as above. Beat in the spiced pumpkin mixture after the
addition of the eggs. Mix in cream and bake as directed above.


Chocolate Marble Cheesecake
1 recipe sponge layer
1 recipe cheesecake
3/4 cup store bought fudge ice cream topping

Preheat the oven to 350F
Prepare cheesecake. Pour half the batter over the sponge layer.
Melt the fudge ice cream topping in a double boiler or microwave. Combine
with the remaining batter. Pour over the plain batter and draw a table
knife through the cake to create a marble patter.
Bake as directed above. Cover the pan with foil after about 45 minutes of
baking to prevent over browning.

Apple Crumb Cheesecake
1 recipe of sponge layer
1 recipe of cheesecake layer

Apple layer
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup light brown sugar, packed
2 tablespoons all purpose four
1 tablespoon cornstarch
teaspoon cinnamon
1 pounds tart-sweet apples
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

Crumb topping
1 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup light brown sugar, packed
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
6 tablespoons unsalted cold butter, cut into small pieces
1/4 cup shortening
1/4 teaspoon lemon extracts
1/3 cup sifted confectioner's sugar

Preheat the oven to 350F
For the apples layer, mix the sugars, flour, cornstarch and cinnamon and set
aside
Peel, core, and slice the apples 1/4 inch thick (you will need 4 cups of
apples). Drizzle with the lemon juice and toss with the sugar mixture.
Spread about 2/3 of the apples over the baked sponge layer.
Spread the cheesecake batter over the apples. Starting about 2 inches from
the edge of the pan, push the remaining apples into the batter until they
are almost completely submerged.
Bake as directed above in the water bath for about 1 1/4 hours or until the
center barely jiggles when you shake the pan, When top sets and starts to
brown, (about 50 minutes) cover the pan with foil for the remainder of the
baking time.
While the cake is baking prepare the crumb topping. Mix the flour, brown
sugar, and cinnamon together in a medium bowl. Work the butter and
shortening into the mixture with your fingers or a pastry blender until the
mixture looks like coarse crumbs about the size of small peas. Stir in the
lemon extract.
After the cake is completely cooled, top with the crumb topping and sprinkle
with the confectioner's sugar. Cover the cake with plastic wrap and
refrigerate it until serving time.





  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-09-2005, 06:13 PM
Dave Bell
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Vox Humana wrote:

I have a recipe that never cracks. If you don't want to make the sponge
layer, just use cookie dough, nut, or crumb crust:


Cheesecake Layer (Plain)
4 8oz packages of cream cheese (not low fat)
2 eggs
3/4 cup heavy whipping cream


Methinks the secret is in plain sight...

Thanks for the recipes, VH!
We love cheesecake, and these are nice variations.

Dave
  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-09-2005, 06:24 PM
Vox Humana
 
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Default


"Dave Bell" wrote in message
...
Vox Humana wrote:

I have a recipe that never cracks. If you don't want to make the sponge
layer, just use cookie dough, nut, or crumb crust:


Cheesecake Layer (Plain)
4 8oz packages of cream cheese (not low fat)
2 eggs
3/4 cup heavy whipping cream


Methinks the secret is in plain sight...

Thanks for the recipes, VH!
We love cheesecake, and these are nice variations.


Hope you like this one. I made it this week for a birthday. It has a nice
texture - a balance between dense and creamy, and a clean, simple flavor.




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