Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 27-12-2004, 03:04 PM
Joseph O'Brien
 
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Default bread crock?

Hello! I received a Pampered Chef Bread Crock for Christmas, and I
have only a vague idea of how to use it. I've never seen or heard of
such a thing. A quick internet search yielded little more than a bunch
of auctions, so I'm posting here in hopes of some advice.

Basically, it's an unglazed stoneware container about 8" tall and 5"
inside diameter. Drill a hole in the bottom and it would make a nice
flower pot. The picture on the box suggests that the bread will rise
well beyond the rim and bake to a perfect, billowy golden crust. Not
sure how much use I have for a skinny, 8" tall loaf, but...

My bread baking skills are limited, to say the yeast (er, I mean
least). I usually just form the dough into a ball, score it, and let
it bake on a pizza stone. Not pretty, but it usually works out.

Before I ruin a loaf using the crock, does anyone have any experience
with one? Any advice on how to adjust time/temp for a typical bread
recipe? Is there any special history behind the bread crock? ("This
traditional stoneware was used by our great-great grandmothers, who
baked perfect artisan loaves in bread crocks that were passed down from
generation to generation. Much like a well-seasoned cast-iron skillet,
bread crocks are considered valuable culinary heirlooms not only for
the generations of love and care behind them, but for the lustrous
patina of natural oils and wild yeasts." Or something like that.)
Any thoughts?

Thanks,
Joseph


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Old 27-12-2004, 03:55 PM
Pan Ohco
 
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Default

On 27 Dec 2004 07:04:43 -0800, "Joseph O'Brien"
wrote:

Hello! I received a Pampered Chef Bread Crock for Christmas, and I
have only a vague idea of how to use it. I've never seen or heard of
such a thing.
Basically, it's an unglazed stoneware container about 8" tall and 5"
inside diameter.


Thanks,
Joseph


Could it be a sourdough starter crock?
http://shop.bakerscatalogue.com/list...=1104162589438

Pan Ohco



The Earth is degenerating these days. Bribery and corruption abound.
Children no longer mind their parents, every man wants to write a
Book, and it is evident that the end of the world is fast approaching.
--Assyrian stone tablet, c. 2800 B.C.
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Old 27-12-2004, 04:53 PM
Pan Ohco
 
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Default

On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 09:55:07 -0600, Pan Ohco wrote:

On 27 Dec 2004 07:04:43 -0800, "Joseph O'Brien"
wrote:

Hello! I received a Pampered Chef Bread Crock for Christmas, and I
have only a vague idea of how to use it. I've never seen or heard of
such a thing.
Basically, it's an unglazed stoneware container about 8" tall and 5"
inside diameter.


Thanks,
Joseph


Could it be a sourdough starter crock?
http://shop.bakerscatalogue.com/list...=1104162589438

Pan Ohco

Sorry to followup my own post, but the above link will not work.
try this www.bakerscatalogue.com, got to shop by number, insert 6781.

Pan Ohco



The Earth is degenerating these days. Bribery and corruption abound.
Children no longer mind their parents, every man wants to write a
Book, and it is evident that the end of the world is fast approaching.
--Assyrian stone tablet, c. 2800 B.C.
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Old 27-12-2004, 05:34 PM
The Cook
 
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Default

"Joseph O'Brien" wrote:

Hello! I received a Pampered Chef Bread Crock for Christmas, and I
have only a vague idea of how to use it. I've never seen or heard of
such a thing. A quick internet search yielded little more than a bunch
of auctions, so I'm posting here in hopes of some advice.

Basically, it's an unglazed stoneware container about 8" tall and 5"
inside diameter. Drill a hole in the bottom and it would make a nice
flower pot. The picture on the box suggests that the bread will rise
well beyond the rim and bake to a perfect, billowy golden crust. Not
sure how much use I have for a skinny, 8" tall loaf, but...

My bread baking skills are limited, to say the yeast (er, I mean
least). I usually just form the dough into a ball, score it, and let
it bake on a pizza stone. Not pretty, but it usually works out.

Before I ruin a loaf using the crock, does anyone have any experience
with one? Any advice on how to adjust time/temp for a typical bread
recipe? Is there any special history behind the bread crock? ("This
traditional stoneware was used by our great-great grandmothers, who
baked perfect artisan loaves in bread crocks that were passed down from
generation to generation. Much like a well-seasoned cast-iron skillet,
bread crocks are considered valuable culinary heirlooms not only for
the generations of love and care behind them, but for the lustrous
patina of natural oils and wild yeasts." Or something like that.)
Any thoughts?

Thanks,
Joseph



Here is the site at Pampered Chef.
http://www.pamperedchef.com/our_prod...ategoryCode=GS

They do have a use and care page.




--
Susan N.

"Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral, 48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)
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Old 27-12-2004, 06:12 PM
L
 
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Default


On 27-Dec-2004, "Joseph O'Brien" wrote:

Any advice on how to adjust time/temp for a typical bread
recipe? Is there any special history behind the bread crock? ("This
traditional stoneware was used by our great-great grandmothers, who
baked perfect artisan loaves in bread crocks that were passed down from
generation to generation. Much like a well-seasoned cast-iron skillet,
bread crocks are considered valuable culinary heirlooms not only for
the generations of love and care behind them, but for the lustrous
patina of natural oils and wild yeasts." Or something like that.)
Any thoughts?


Do a google search for flowerpot bread and you'll find the answers you seek.

The bread crock is a variation on the flowerpot, which were often used to
create gift breads. The terra cotta works similar to a bread/pizza stone in
creating a "better" crust. Often, the top of the bread is decorated, seeds,
slashing or topnot (like a brioche).

I have seen the flowerpot bread given as gifts, in the pot, wrapped with
cellophane and ribbon as might be used on a potted flower gift.


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Old 27-12-2004, 06:46 PM
Peggy
 
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Default

"Joseph O'Brien" wrote in message
oups.com...
Hello! I received a Pampered Chef Bread Crock for Christmas, and I
have only a vague idea of how to use it. I've never seen or heard of
such a thing. A quick internet search yielded little more than a bunch
of auctions, so I'm posting here in hopes of some advice.

Basically, it's an unglazed stoneware container about 8" tall and 5"
inside diameter. Drill a hole in the bottom and it would make a nice
flower pot. The picture on the box suggests that the bread will rise
well beyond the rim and bake to a perfect, billowy golden crust. Not
sure how much use I have for a skinny, 8" tall loaf, but...

My bread baking skills are limited, to say the yeast (er, I mean
least). I usually just form the dough into a ball, score it, and let
it bake on a pizza stone. Not pretty, but it usually works out.

Before I ruin a loaf using the crock, does anyone have any experience
with one? Any advice on how to adjust time/temp for a typical bread
recipe? Is there any special history behind the bread crock? ("This
traditional stoneware was used by our great-great grandmothers, who
baked perfect artisan loaves in bread crocks that were passed down from
generation to generation. Much like a well-seasoned cast-iron skillet,
bread crocks are considered valuable culinary heirlooms not only for
the generations of love and care behind them, but for the lustrous
patina of natural oils and wild yeasts." Or something like that.)
Any thoughts?

Thanks,
Joseph


Somebody already posted the link for the PC site on this item.
If you don't want to bake bread with it, I also found these suggestions
online: Use the plastic liner to display fresh or silk flowers. Can also
be used on your countertop to stylishly hold your utensils. Make baked
beans! Keep beverages cool!
~Peggy


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Old 27-12-2004, 09:47 PM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Peggy" wrote in message
...
"Joseph O'Brien" wrote in message
oups.com...
Hello! I received a Pampered Chef Bread Crock for Christmas, and I
have only a vague idea of how to use it. I've never seen or heard of
such a thing. A quick internet search yielded little more than a bunch
of auctions, so I'm posting here in hopes of some advice.

Basically, it's an unglazed stoneware container about 8" tall and 5"
inside diameter. Drill a hole in the bottom and it would make a nice
flower pot. The picture on the box suggests that the bread will rise
well beyond the rim and bake to a perfect, billowy golden crust. Not
sure how much use I have for a skinny, 8" tall loaf, but...

My bread baking skills are limited, to say the yeast (er, I mean
least). I usually just form the dough into a ball, score it, and let
it bake on a pizza stone. Not pretty, but it usually works out.

Before I ruin a loaf using the crock, does anyone have any experience
with one? Any advice on how to adjust time/temp for a typical bread
recipe? Is there any special history behind the bread crock? ("This
traditional stoneware was used by our great-great grandmothers, who
baked perfect artisan loaves in bread crocks that were passed down from
generation to generation. Much like a well-seasoned cast-iron skillet,
bread crocks are considered valuable culinary heirlooms not only for
the generations of love and care behind them, but for the lustrous
patina of natural oils and wild yeasts." Or something like that.)
Any thoughts?

Thanks,
Joseph


Somebody already posted the link for the PC site on this item.
If you don't want to bake bread with it, I also found these suggestions
online: Use the plastic liner to display fresh or silk flowers. Can also
be used on your countertop to stylishly hold your utensils. Make baked
beans! Keep beverages cool!
~Peggy


Um! Bake garlic in.
Dee




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