Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 22-12-2004, 10:16 PM
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Default baking stone

I recently received a baking stone, minus the instructions and box. I do not have any idea how long to preheat the stone prior to use and how long it should be used as opposed to time in oven without the stone. If any one can help me I would be very happy to begin using the stone. Thank you

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Old 23-12-2004, 04:18 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
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Darcy Legare wrote in
news:[email protected] eranews:

I recently received a baking stone, minus the instructions and box. I do
not have any idea how long to preheat the stone prior to use and how
long it should be used as opposed to time in oven without the stone. If
any one can help me I would be very happy to begin using the stone.
Thank you


Place the stone in a cold oven (I keep my stone in the oven all the time),
and preheat at least 30 minutes. I don't generally adjust the baking time.
The object is not to speed up cooking, but to improve the crust of most
things baked on the stone. Your oven temperature remains the same as if the
stone wasn't there.

--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.
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Old 23-12-2004, 04:24 AM
Eric Jorgensen
 
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On Thu, 23 Dec 2004 04:18:59 GMT
Wayne Boatwright wrote:

Darcy Legare wrote in
news:[email protected] eranews:

I recently received a baking stone, minus the instructions and box. I
do not have any idea how long to preheat the stone prior to use and how
long it should be used as opposed to time in oven without the stone. If
any one can help me I would be very happy to begin using the stone.
Thank you


Place the stone in a cold oven (I keep my stone in the oven all the
time), and preheat at least 30 minutes. I don't generally adjust the
baking time. The object is not to speed up cooking, but to improve the
crust of most things baked on the stone. Your oven temperature remains
the same as if the stone wasn't there.



Depends what you're baking.

At about 500 degrees, it really cuts down the bake time of a pizza. There's a very rapid transfer of thermal energy between the stone
and the crust.

At 350, baking bread, i imagine it doesn't affect bake time much.
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Old 23-12-2004, 06:40 AM
silentking
 
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:
Darcy Legare wrote in
news:[email protected] eranews:


I recently received a baking stone, minus the instructions and box. I do
not have any idea how long to preheat the stone prior to use and how
long it should be used as opposed to time in oven without the stone. If
any one can help me I would be very happy to begin using the stone.
Thank you



Place the stone in a cold oven (I keep my stone in the oven all the time),
and preheat at least 30 minutes. I don't generally adjust the baking time.
The object is not to speed up cooking, but to improve the crust of most
things baked on the stone. Your oven temperature remains the same as if the
stone wasn't there.

But I thought the Baking Stone (in addition to what you stated) was to
even out the temperature inside the oven to keep it at a constant
temperature. Is this an additional function of the stone? My oven is the
worst one ever made (really!) and I was thinking of getting some
Baking Stones for this purpose.

P
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Old 23-12-2004, 06:40 AM
silentking
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Wayne Boatwright wrote:
Darcy Legare wrote in
news:[email protected] eranews:


I recently received a baking stone, minus the instructions and box. I do
not have any idea how long to preheat the stone prior to use and how
long it should be used as opposed to time in oven without the stone. If
any one can help me I would be very happy to begin using the stone.
Thank you



Place the stone in a cold oven (I keep my stone in the oven all the time),
and preheat at least 30 minutes. I don't generally adjust the baking time.
The object is not to speed up cooking, but to improve the crust of most
things baked on the stone. Your oven temperature remains the same as if the
stone wasn't there.

But I thought the Baking Stone (in addition to what you stated) was to
even out the temperature inside the oven to keep it at a constant
temperature. Is this an additional function of the stone? My oven is the
worst one ever made (really!) and I was thinking of getting some
Baking Stones for this purpose.

P


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Old 23-12-2004, 06:50 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
Posts: n/a
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silentking wrote in
om:

Wayne Boatwright wrote:
Darcy Legare wrote in
news:[email protected] eranews:


I recently received a baking stone, minus the instructions and box. I
do not have any idea how long to preheat the stone prior to use and how
long it should be used as opposed to time in oven without the stone. If
any one can help me I would be very happy to begin using the stone.
Thank you



Place the stone in a cold oven (I keep my stone in the oven all the
time), and preheat at least 30 minutes. I don't generally adjust the
baking time. The object is not to speed up cooking, but to improve the
crust of most things baked on the stone. Your oven temperature remains
the same as if the stone wasn't there.

But I thought the Baking Stone (in addition to what you stated) was to
even out the temperature inside the oven to keep it at a constant
temperature. Is this an additional function of the stone? My oven is the
worst one ever made (really!) and I was thinking of getting some
Baking Stones for this purpose.

P


Yes, the retained heat of the stone does help to maintain a more even temp.
You'll notice an improvement.


--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.
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Old 23-12-2004, 06:51 AM
Eric Jorgensen
 
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On Thu, 23 Dec 2004 01:40:06 -0500
silentking wrote:

But I thought the Baking Stone (in addition to what you stated) was to
even out the temperature inside the oven to keep it at a constant
temperature. Is this an additional function of the stone? My oven is the
worst one ever made (really!) and I was thinking of getting some
Baking Stones for this purpose.



Well, yes and no. They act somewhat as a heat spreader, and change the
convection currents in your oven. They block direct radiated heat, though
they radiate some on their own.

Maybe you should start with quarry tiles if this an experiment in
evening out the temperature of your oven - five 8" tiles - one of them cut
squarely in half - will fit the shelf in most consumer ovens nicely.

Speaking of which, I need to toss mine and replace them with a fibrament
stone. Now that I'm all fiscally solvent & making what I'm worth again and
all that.
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Old 23-12-2004, 06:51 AM
Eric Jorgensen
 
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On Thu, 23 Dec 2004 01:40:06 -0500
silentking wrote:

But I thought the Baking Stone (in addition to what you stated) was to
even out the temperature inside the oven to keep it at a constant
temperature. Is this an additional function of the stone? My oven is the
worst one ever made (really!) and I was thinking of getting some
Baking Stones for this purpose.



Well, yes and no. They act somewhat as a heat spreader, and change the
convection currents in your oven. They block direct radiated heat, though
they radiate some on their own.

Maybe you should start with quarry tiles if this an experiment in
evening out the temperature of your oven - five 8" tiles - one of them cut
squarely in half - will fit the shelf in most consumer ovens nicely.

Speaking of which, I need to toss mine and replace them with a fibrament
stone. Now that I'm all fiscally solvent & making what I'm worth again and
all that.
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Old 23-12-2004, 06:55 AM
silentking
 
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Eric Jorgensen wrote:
On Thu, 23 Dec 2004 01:40:06 -0500
silentking wrote:


But I thought the Baking Stone (in addition to what you stated) was to
even out the temperature inside the oven to keep it at a constant
temperature. Is this an additional function of the stone? My oven is the
worst one ever made (really!) and I was thinking of getting some
Baking Stones for this purpose.




Well, yes and no. They act somewhat as a heat spreader, and change the
convection currents in your oven. They block direct radiated heat, though
they radiate some on their own.

Maybe you should start with quarry tiles if this an experiment in
evening out the temperature of your oven - five 8" tiles - one of them cut
squarely in half - will fit the shelf in most consumer ovens nicely.

Speaking of which, I need to toss mine and replace them with a fibrament
stone. Now that I'm all fiscally solvent & making what I'm worth again and
all that.

Goodness, that was a quick responce! lol Thanks for the suggestion, I
will try that first.

P
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Old 23-12-2004, 06:55 AM
silentking
 
Posts: n/a
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Eric Jorgensen wrote:
On Thu, 23 Dec 2004 01:40:06 -0500
silentking wrote:


But I thought the Baking Stone (in addition to what you stated) was to
even out the temperature inside the oven to keep it at a constant
temperature. Is this an additional function of the stone? My oven is the
worst one ever made (really!) and I was thinking of getting some
Baking Stones for this purpose.




Well, yes and no. They act somewhat as a heat spreader, and change the
convection currents in your oven. They block direct radiated heat, though
they radiate some on their own.

Maybe you should start with quarry tiles if this an experiment in
evening out the temperature of your oven - five 8" tiles - one of them cut
squarely in half - will fit the shelf in most consumer ovens nicely.

Speaking of which, I need to toss mine and replace them with a fibrament
stone. Now that I'm all fiscally solvent & making what I'm worth again and
all that.

Goodness, that was a quick responce! lol Thanks for the suggestion, I
will try that first.

P


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Old 23-12-2004, 06:59 AM
Eric Jorgensen
 
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Default

On Thu, 23 Dec 2004 01:55:01 -0500
silentking wrote:


Goodness, that was a quick responce! lol Thanks for the suggestion, I
will try that first.



Oh yeah, make sure they are unglazed.
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Old 23-12-2004, 06:59 AM
Eric Jorgensen
 
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Default

On Thu, 23 Dec 2004 01:55:01 -0500
silentking wrote:


Goodness, that was a quick responce! lol Thanks for the suggestion, I
will try that first.



Oh yeah, make sure they are unglazed.
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Old 23-12-2004, 10:01 PM
 
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My instructions said to never get it wet -
I scrape any baked on pieces with a dough scraper. Over time, it will
darken a bit.
Beats those pizza pans with the holes. I never remove it from my oven
when baking or roasting anything.



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