Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 19-12-2004, 07:50 PM
Mary
 
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Default Middle Eastern Bread Recipe

Ok, I'm sure someone in this very knowledgeable group can help me here.
We have a local Middle Eastern specialty store just down the street
from our house full of wonderful spices, foods, etc. (we have a large
Armenian and Greek neighborhood in Cambridge/Watertown, MA) and we have
discovered this fantastic bread that is not unlike froccicia or naan. It
is chewy, a bit salty, and has great texture. The package says
"Matnakhash" and lists only flour, yeast, salt and water as the
ingredients. I've done a dogpile.com (much better than google) search
for "Matnakhash" and had no success with finding a recipe to try at
home. I don't speak either Armenian nor Greek and the wonderful ladies
that run the store don't seem to speak English, I can't get the recipe.

Anyone know that this bread is called or have a recipe?

Thanks and all the best,
Mary

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Old 19-12-2004, 08:45 PM
Scott
 
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Default

In article
,
Mary wrote:

Ok, I'm sure someone in this very knowledgeable group can help me here.
We have a local Middle Eastern specialty store just down the street
from our house full of wonderful spices, foods, etc. (we have a large
Armenian and Greek neighborhood in Cambridge/Watertown, MA) and we have
discovered this fantastic bread that is not unlike froccicia or naan. It
is chewy, a bit salty, and has great texture. The package says
"Matnakhash" and lists only flour, yeast, salt and water as the
ingredients. I've done a dogpile.com (much better than google) search
for "Matnakhash" and had no success with finding a recipe to try at
home. I don't speak either Armenian nor Greek and the wonderful ladies
that run the store don't seem to speak English, I can't get the recipe.

Anyone know that this bread is called or have a recipe?


Also spelled matnakash. I don't have a recipe, but maybe you could ask
he
http://www.armeniadiaspora.com/
or he
http://www.anahit.am/anahit/index.html
or he
http://forum.armenianclub.com/archive/index.php/f-31

This is an article which briefly mentions the bread:
http://www.armeniadiaspora.com/feature/archive/040830.html

--
to respond (OT only), change "spamless.invalid" to "optonline.net"

http://www.thecoffeefaq.com/
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Old 19-12-2004, 08:45 PM
Scott
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article
,
Mary wrote:

Ok, I'm sure someone in this very knowledgeable group can help me here.
We have a local Middle Eastern specialty store just down the street
from our house full of wonderful spices, foods, etc. (we have a large
Armenian and Greek neighborhood in Cambridge/Watertown, MA) and we have
discovered this fantastic bread that is not unlike froccicia or naan. It
is chewy, a bit salty, and has great texture. The package says
"Matnakhash" and lists only flour, yeast, salt and water as the
ingredients. I've done a dogpile.com (much better than google) search
for "Matnakhash" and had no success with finding a recipe to try at
home. I don't speak either Armenian nor Greek and the wonderful ladies
that run the store don't seem to speak English, I can't get the recipe.

Anyone know that this bread is called or have a recipe?


Also spelled matnakash. I don't have a recipe, but maybe you could ask
he
http://www.armeniadiaspora.com/
or he
http://www.anahit.am/anahit/index.html
or he
http://forum.armenianclub.com/archive/index.php/f-31

This is an article which briefly mentions the bread:
http://www.armeniadiaspora.com/feature/archive/040830.html

--
to respond (OT only), change "spamless.invalid" to "optonline.net"

http://www.thecoffeefaq.com/
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Old 19-12-2004, 10:03 PM
Dusty
 
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Default

"Mary" wrote in message
...
Ok, I'm sure someone in this very knowledgeable group can help me here.

....
is chewy, a bit salty, and has great texture. The package says
"Matnakhash" and lists only flour, yeast, salt and water as the
ingredients. I've done a dogpile.com (much better than google) search for
"Matnakhash" and had no success with finding a recipe to try at home.

....
Anyone know that this bread is called or have a recipe?

It's too bad that your "much better than Google" search engine couldn't
figure out that it's spelled: "matnakash" (:-o)!

IIRC; matnakash is a regional name for a bread more commonly known as
Barbari. Use that, and you can find many recipes...

Keep in mind that this kind of bread is both ancient and widely made with
many, similar variations. And yes, I like it as well. Your query made me
do some looking. I found several interesting related recipes...I'm looking
forward to the next few days...


Dusty
--
Remove STORE to reply




Thanks and all the best,
Mary



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Old 19-12-2004, 10:03 PM
Dusty
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Mary" wrote in message
...
Ok, I'm sure someone in this very knowledgeable group can help me here.

....
is chewy, a bit salty, and has great texture. The package says
"Matnakhash" and lists only flour, yeast, salt and water as the
ingredients. I've done a dogpile.com (much better than google) search for
"Matnakhash" and had no success with finding a recipe to try at home.

....
Anyone know that this bread is called or have a recipe?

It's too bad that your "much better than Google" search engine couldn't
figure out that it's spelled: "matnakash" (:-o)!

IIRC; matnakash is a regional name for a bread more commonly known as
Barbari. Use that, and you can find many recipes...

Keep in mind that this kind of bread is both ancient and widely made with
many, similar variations. And yes, I like it as well. Your query made me
do some looking. I found several interesting related recipes...I'm looking
forward to the next few days...


Dusty
--
Remove STORE to reply




Thanks and all the best,
Mary





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Old 19-12-2004, 10:15 PM
Mary
 
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Default

Dusty wrote:


It's too bad that your "much better than Google" search engine couldn't
figure out that it's spelled: "matnakash" (:-o)!


Only using what is on the label on the wrapper from the Aremenian bakery
and I like dogpile because my queeries to it aren't immediately met with
"buy here" links like on google ;-)


IIRC; matnakash is a regional name for a bread more commonly known as
Barbari. Use that, and you can find many recipes...


Thanks for the suggestion. I took a look at the recipes that came up
using that and they all call for sugar and oils. The ingredients on our
loaves just list yeast, flour, salt, and water. But I'll give one of
these a try and see what comes of it (still looks quite tasty)

Again, thanks for the help

Best Regards,
Mary

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Old 19-12-2004, 10:15 PM
Mary
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Dusty wrote:


It's too bad that your "much better than Google" search engine couldn't
figure out that it's spelled: "matnakash" (:-o)!


Only using what is on the label on the wrapper from the Aremenian bakery
and I like dogpile because my queeries to it aren't immediately met with
"buy here" links like on google ;-)


IIRC; matnakash is a regional name for a bread more commonly known as
Barbari. Use that, and you can find many recipes...


Thanks for the suggestion. I took a look at the recipes that came up
using that and they all call for sugar and oils. The ingredients on our
loaves just list yeast, flour, salt, and water. But I'll give one of
these a try and see what comes of it (still looks quite tasty)

Again, thanks for the help

Best Regards,
Mary

  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-12-2004, 11:34 PM
Dusty
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Hi again, Mary;

....
IIRC; matnakash is a regional name for a bread more commonly known as
Barbari. Use that, and you can find many recipes...


Thanks for the suggestion. I took a look at the recipes that came up
using that and they all call for sugar and oils. The ingredients on our
loaves just list yeast, flour, salt, and water. But I'll give one of
these a try and see what comes of it (still looks quite tasty)

Yeah, I saw that as well. I know that those breads are ancient and have
been made in one form or another across a large section of the populated
portion of this planet for something approaching a dozen millennia or more.
And as certain as I'm sitting here, I know that prior to about a hundred
years ago, the vast majority of it wasn't made with "yeast." Being a
dyed-in-the-wool sourdough nut, I've been fooling with converting recipes
BACK to what was probably their original state.

The sugar is needed as yeast food, and was almost certainly unavailable to
bakers that long ago. The SD critters use the flour directly and don't need
sugar. If you're going to use yeast, you'll need the sugar to give them a
wakeup call. But I don't think it'll detract from the bread. So go ahead
and use it. If you elect to go SD, then that aspect of it will go away...

I can't comment on the accuracy of the ingredient list you gave (I believe
you read it as you say...but that doesn't guarantee that it's completely
correct). All of my SD bread recipes contain ONLY flour, water, salt &
culture, and I've been quite happy with them. All of the "differences"
between the various breads I make (Rustic, Rye, Coccodrillo, Ciabatta,
Francesi, Poilane, and Provender) are due to blending different flours and
the handling/treatment of the dough before and/or sometimes during baking.
The basic ingredients are all the same...

Barbari is just one version of the many flat-breads that can be found in
that area of the world (greater Persia). They are all similar in most
respects. Lavosh is the same as Barbari, except it's unleavened. Matnakash
is little more than a leavened version of Lavosh sprinkled with seeds.
Given that, just leave out the fats and oils. All they really do anyway is
make the texture of the bread a bit nicer (different?) to eat.

But most importantly, have fun baking it!


Dusty
San Jose, Ca.


Again, thanks for the help

Best Regards,
Mary





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