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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

help on escarole replacement.



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 21-08-2006, 01:25 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,861
Default help on escarole replacement.

Never having, even seen escarole AFAIK...I was wondering if I could
substitute for it with fresh spinach leaves in the recipe below?




ESCAROLE, BEAN AND SAUSAGE SOUP

Here's a hearty main-course soup perfect for a simple winter dinner. The
chopped escarole fills a large bowl but wilts considerably when cooked.

2 tablespoons olive oil
3/4 pound kielbasa sausage, diced
4 large garlic cloves, chopped
1 large head escarole, coarsely chopped
3 14 1/2-ounce cans low-salt chicken broth
1 15-ounce can cannellini (white kidney beans)
Grated Parmesan cheese

Heat oil in heavy large Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add sausage and
garlic and sauté until sausage is lightly browned, about 8 minutes. Add
escarole and toss until wilted, about 5 minutes. Add broth and cannellini
with their juices. Simmer until flavors blend and soup thickens slightly,
about 20 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Ladle soup into
bowls. Serve with Parmesan cheese.

Serves 6.

Bon Appétit
March 1996
Dawn Murray: Allenwood, New Jersey

--


Curiosity killed the cat, but for a while I was a suspect

-Alan
Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 21-08-2006, 01:52 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 27
Default help on escarole replacement.


Mr Libido Incognito wrote:
Never having, even seen escarole AFAIK...I was wondering if I could
substitute for it with fresh spinach leaves in the recipe below?




ESCAROLE, BEAN AND SAUSAGE SOUP

Here's a hearty main-course soup perfect for a simple winter dinner. The
chopped escarole fills a large bowl but wilts considerably when cooked.

2 tablespoons olive oil
3/4 pound kielbasa sausage, diced
4 large garlic cloves, chopped
1 large head escarole, coarsely chopped
3 14 1/2-ounce cans low-salt chicken broth
1 15-ounce can cannellini (white kidney beans)
Grated Parmesan cheese

Heat oil in heavy large Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add sausage and
garlic and sauté until sausage is lightly browned, about 8 minutes. Add
escarole and toss until wilted, about 5 minutes. Add broth and cannellini
with their juices. Simmer until flavors blend and soup thickens slightly,
about 20 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Ladle soup into
bowls. Serve with Parmesan cheese.

Serves 6.


I make a similiar soup using swiss chard, it works very well. I am sure
spinach would do also. Jan

Bon Appétit
March 1996
Dawn Murray: Allenwood, New Jersey

--


Curiosity killed the cat, but for a while I was a suspect

-Alan


  #3 (permalink)  
Old 21-08-2006, 02:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 5,103
Default help on escarole replacement.

"Mr Libido Incognito" wrote in message
...
Never having, even seen escarole AFAIK...I was wondering if I could
substitute for it with fresh spinach leaves in the recipe below?

ESCAROLE, BEAN AND SAUSAGE SOUP



Escarole leaves have bigger central ribs than spinach. Those ribs will
retain a little firmness even after the leaves themselves have wilted.
Spinach leaf ribs will become softer more quickly, so there'd be a texture
difference between the two. Jan's tip, using swiss chard, would be a better
idea. It'll also have a little bitterness, which would work better in that
soup.

Dandelion greens would probably work, too. Like escarole, their bitterness
depends on how hot the weather was where they were grown. If you've got some
in your yard, there's no reason not to use them, ASSUMING YOU DO NOT USE
LAWN CHEMICALS OF ANY KIND.


  #4 (permalink)  
Old 21-08-2006, 02:15 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,861
Default help on escarole replacement.

Jan wrote on 21 Aug 2006 in rec.food.cooking

I make a similiar soup using swiss chard, it works very well. I am sure
spinach would do also. Jan


Thanks but on further examination I'm not going with that recipe...well I'm
changing it a lot ...adding carrot, onion, celery,fennel, some crushed red
pepper, pepercorns, bay leaf or 3 and increading the sausage, garlic and
stock amounts... so I figure the spinach is ok since the flavour will be
totally different anyways.

--


Curiosity killed the cat, but for a while I was a suspect

-Alan
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 21-08-2006, 02:22 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 17
Default help on escarole replacement.


"Mr Libido Incognito" wrote

Thanks but on further examination I'm not going with that recipe...well
I'm
changing it a lot ...adding carrot, onion, celery,fennel, some crushed red
pepper, pepercorns, bay leaf or 3 and increading the sausage, garlic and
stock amounts... so I figure the spinach is ok since the flavour will be
totally different anyways.


I'd be inclined to replace it with kale, if I had to. I bet you they
have escarole in your store, Alan. In big leafy bunches. Big.

nancy


  #6 (permalink)  
Old 21-08-2006, 03:04 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 5,103
Default help on escarole replacement.

"Mr Libido Incognito" wrote in message
...
Jan wrote on 21 Aug 2006 in rec.food.cooking

I make a similiar soup using swiss chard, it works very well. I am sure
spinach would do also. Jan


Thanks but on further examination I'm not going with that recipe...well
I'm
changing it a lot ...adding carrot, onion, celery,fennel, some crushed red
pepper, pepercorns, bay leaf or 3 and increading the sausage, garlic and
stock amounts... so I figure the spinach is ok since the flavour will be
totally different anyways.


Whoah...lots of conflicting flavors there. I'll predict that the spinach
will not stand out at all as a flavor.


  #7 (permalink)  
Old 21-08-2006, 03:17 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 4,984
Default help on escarole replacement.

Mr Libido Incognito wrote:
Never having, even seen escarole AFAIK...I was wondering if I could
substitute for it with fresh spinach leaves in the recipe below?

Escarole is sometimes labeled (or mislabled?)in stores "Curly Endive".
It isn't as easy to find it weekly, but look near the leaf lettuces.
Here is a soup I like to make with it-

* Exported from MasterCook *

Chick Pea-Escarole Soup

Recipe By :
Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:20
Categories : Soups & Stews Italian

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
8 ounces diced pancetta
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 medium onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, chopped
14 ounces canned diced italian plum tomatoes
16 ounces canned chick peas, drained/rinsed
4 cups chicken stock
2 cups water
1 head escarole, coarsely chopped
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper

In large saucepan, heat olive oil over medium heat. Add pancetta and
onion and cook 2-3 minutes, or until onion is softened. Add garlic and
cook 1 minute longer.
Add tomatoes, chick peas, stock, water, escarole, salt and pepper.
Bring to boil, reduce heat to medium-low, anc cook uncovered until
escarole is tender, about 20-30 minutes.

Serve with grated parmesan cheese.
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 21-08-2006, 03:27 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 6,727
Default help on escarole replacement.

Mr Libido Incognito wrote:
Never having, even seen escarole AFAIK...I was wondering if I could
substitute for it with fresh spinach leaves in the recipe below?


ESCAROLE, BEAN AND SAUSAGE SOUP

It should work... might even taste better

Jill


  #9 (permalink)  
Old 21-08-2006, 03:40 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 51
Default help on escarole replacement.


Goomba38 wrote:


Escarole is sometimes labeled (or mislabled?)in stores "Curly Endive".
It isn't as easy to find it weekly, but look near the leaf lettuces.
Here is a soup I like to make with it-

Yep, I was going to say the same thing....my grocery store lables it
"curly endive". I use it for Wedding soup (the Italian soup with
little meatballs, escarole and egg). Your soup recipe sounds awesome.

Sandy

  #10 (permalink)  
Old 21-08-2006, 04:35 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,861
Default help on escarole replacement.

Mr Libido Incognito wrote on 21 Aug 2006 in rec.food.cooking

Jan wrote on 21 Aug 2006 in rec.food.cooking

I make a similiar soup using swiss chard, it works very well. I am
sure spinach would do also. Jan


Thanks but on further examination I'm not going with that
recipe...well I'm changing it a lot ...adding carrot, onion,
celery,fennel, some crushed red pepper, pepercorns, bay leaf or 3 and
increading the sausage, garlic and stock amounts... so I figure the
spinach is ok since the flavour will be totally different anyways.


This is what I settled for. Indented stuff are my additions so
effectively the original recipe has totally changed.


Al's BEAN AND SAUSAGE SOUP

2 tablespoons olive oil used canola oil
1 pound kielbasa sausage, diced more like 1.5 lbs
4 large garlic cloves, chopped more like 7 cloves
1 fennel chopped
1 onion chopped
3 carrots chopped
1 celery heart with leaves chopped
1 smallish bag baby spinach leaves, washed
4 14 1/2-ounce cans low-salt chicken broth more like approx 2.5 quarts
1 15 ounce can navy beans
1 15 ounce can diced tomatoes with herbs
1 16 oz cnt of sour cream

Heat oil in heavy large Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add sausage and
garlic and sauté until sausage is lightly browned, about 8 minutes. Add
in veggies except spinach stir about 5 minutes more. Add broth and navy
beans with their juices , diced tomatoes and spinach. Simmer until
flavors blend and soup thickens slightly, about 20 minutes. Add sour
cream here and just let simmer 5 more minutes...serve.


--


Curiosity killed the cat, but for a while I was a suspect

-Alan
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 21-08-2006, 04:59 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 65
Default help on escarole replacement.

"Goomba38" wrote in message
. ..

Escarole is sometimes labeled (or mislabled?)
in stores "Curly Endive".


It's also called chicory, depending on where you are in the world.
-j


  #12 (permalink)  
Old 21-08-2006, 06:55 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 5,103
Default help on escarole replacement.

"jacqui{JB}" wrote in message
...
"Goomba38" wrote in message
. ..

Escarole is sometimes labeled (or mislabled?)
in stores "Curly Endive".


It's also called chicory, depending on where you are in the world.
-j



Even seed catalogs can't keep the names straight. Or, maybe they use every
name they can, in the hope that people will look at the pictures and decide
for themselves.


  #13 (permalink)  
Old 21-08-2006, 09:50 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,022
Default help on escarole replacement.

In article ,
"JoeSpareBedroom" wrote:

"Mr Libido Incognito" wrote in message
...
Jan wrote on 21 Aug 2006 in rec.food.cooking

I make a similiar soup using swiss chard, it works very well. I am sure
spinach would do also. Jan


Thanks but on further examination I'm not going with that recipe...well
I'm
changing it a lot ...adding carrot, onion, celery,fennel, some crushed red
pepper, pepercorns, bay leaf or 3 and increading the sausage, garlic and
stock amounts... so I figure the spinach is ok since the flavour will be
totally different anyways.


Whoah...lots of conflicting flavors there. I'll predict that the spinach
will not stand out at all as a flavor.


I'd use chard personally. I think it'd hold up better texture-wise.
--
Peace!
Om

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch"
-- Jack Nicholson
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 21-08-2006, 11:38 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 9,315
Default help on escarole replacement.


Goomba38 wrote:

Escarole is sometimes labeled (or mislabled?)in stores "Curly Endive".


'Zactly! Escarole (aka curly endive) is almost always available year
round, in the US.


endive
[EN-dyv, AHN-deev, ahn-DEEV]
Endive is closely related to and often confused with its cousin,
CHICORY.

[Chicory has thinner, much more frilly leaves and is more bitter... I
like both... in salads, soups, braised, etc.]

They're both part of the same botanical family, Cichorium. There are
three main varieties of endive: Belgian endive, curly endive and
escarole. Belgian endive, also known as French endive and witloof
(white leaf), is a small (about 6-inch-long), cigar-shaped head of
cream-colored, tightly packed, slightly bitter leaves. It's grown in
complete darkness to prevent it from turning green, using a
labor-intensive growing technique known as BLANCHING. Belgian endive is
available from September through May, with a peak season from November
through April. Buy crisp, firmly packed heads with pale, yellow-green
tips. Belgian endives become bitter when exposed to light. They should
be refrigerated, wrapped in a paper towel inside a plastic bag, for no
more than a day. They can be served cold as part of a salad, or cooked
by braising or baking. Curly endive, often mistakenly called chicory
in the United States, grows in loose heads of lacy, green-rimmed outer
leaves that curl at the tips. The off-white center leaves form a
compact heart. The leaves of the curly endive have a prickly texture
and slightly bitter taste. Escarole has broad, slightly curved, pale
green leaves with a milder flavor than either Belgian or curly endive.
Both curly endive and escarole are available year-round, with the peak
season from June through October. They should be selected for their
fresh, crisp texture; avoid heads with discoloration or insect damage.
Store curly endive and escarole, tightly wrapped, in the refrigerator
for up to 3 days. They're both used mainly in salads, but can also be
briefly cooked and eaten as a vegetable or in soups.

© Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995 based on THE FOOD
LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst.
---

Sheldon

  #15 (permalink)  
Old 22-08-2006, 03:02 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 5,103
Default help on escarole replacement.

"OmManiPadmeOmelet" wrote in message
news
In article ,
"JoeSpareBedroom" wrote:

"Mr Libido Incognito" wrote in message
...
Jan wrote on 21 Aug 2006 in rec.food.cooking

I make a similiar soup using swiss chard, it works very well. I am
sure
spinach would do also. Jan


Thanks but on further examination I'm not going with that recipe...well
I'm
changing it a lot ...adding carrot, onion, celery,fennel, some crushed
red
pepper, pepercorns, bay leaf or 3 and increading the sausage, garlic
and
stock amounts... so I figure the spinach is ok since the flavour will
be
totally different anyways.


Whoah...lots of conflicting flavors there. I'll predict that the spinach
will not stand out at all as a flavor.


I'd use chard personally. I think it'd hold up better texture-wise.
--
Peace!
Om


Yup.


 




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