Wine (alt.food.wine) Devoted to the discussion of wine and wine-related topics. A place to read and comment about wines, wine and food matching, storage systems, wine paraphernalia, etc. In general, any topic related to wine is valid fodder for the group.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-10-2010, 08:28 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 5
Default Safe Metal Levels in Wines From Italy, Brazil, Argentina

Seen in passing:

Safe Metal Levels in Wines From Italy, Brazil, Argentina
Wines from three of the 15 nations studied had safe levels of heavy metals:
Italy, Brazil, and Argentina.

Based on the maximum THQs for wines from each nation, here's the list of the
worst offenders:

a.. Hungary
b.. Slovakia
c.. France
d.. Austria
e.. Spain
f.. Germany
g.. Portugal
h.. Greece
i.. Czech Republic
j.. Jordan
k.. Macedonia
l.. Serbia
Hungary and Slovakia had maximum potential THQ values over 350. France,
Austria, Spain, Germany, and Portugal -- nations that import large
quantities of wine to the U.S. -- had maximum potential THQ values over 100.


  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-10-2010, 08:55 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 340
Default Safe Metal Levels in Wines From Italy, Brazil, Argentina


"Borg Master" skrev i melding
...
Hungary and Slovakia had maximum potential THQ values over 350. France,
Austria, Spain, Germany, and Portugal -- nations that import large
quantities of wine to the U.S.

You cannot import anything to another country..., you export to it...

:-) Anders


  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-10-2010, 09:42 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 4,127
Default Safe Metal Levels in Wines From Italy, Brazil, Argentina

Anders wrote on Tue, 26 Oct 2010 21:55:45 +0200:


"Borg Master" skrev i melding
...
Hungary and Slovakia had maximum potential THQ values over
350. France, Austria, Spain, Germany, and Portugal -- nations
that import large quantities of wine to the U.S.

You cannot import anything to another country..., you export
to it...


:-) Anders


Justified grammatical quibbles aside :-), I think I will be staying away
from Old World Wines. You can do very well and save a lot of money by
drinking US, Argentinian, Chilean, New Zealand and Australian wines.

--

James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland

Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not

  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-10-2010, 09:43 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 49
Default Safe Metal Levels in Wines From Italy, Brazil, Argentina

Seen in passing:

Safe Metal Levels in Wines From Italy, Brazil, Argentina
Wines from three of the 15 nations studied had safe levels of heavy
metals:
Italy, Brazil, and Argentina.

Based on the maximum THQs for wines from each nation, here's the list of
the
worst offenders:

a.. Hungary
b.. Slovakia
c.. France
d.. Austria
e.. Spain
f.. Germany
g.. Portugal
h.. Greece
i.. Czech Republic
j.. Jordan
k.. Macedonia
l.. Serbia
Hungary and Slovakia had maximum potential THQ values over 350. France,
Austria, Spain, Germany, and Portugal -- nations that import large
quantities of wine to the U.S. -- had maximum potential THQ values over
100.


Is there a source for these figures online?

Martin

  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-10-2010, 10:03 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 340
Default Safe Metal Levels in Wines From Italy, Brazil, Argentina

And South Africa too? Have had 3 different the last 5 days.
Anders

"James Silverton" skrev i melding
...
Anders wrote on Tue, 26 Oct 2010 21:55:45 +0200:


"Borg Master" skrev i melding
...
Hungary and Slovakia had maximum potential THQ values over
350. France, Austria, Spain, Germany, and Portugal -- nations
that import large quantities of wine to the U.S.

You cannot import anything to another country..., you export
to it...


:-) Anders


Justified grammatical quibbles aside :-), I think I will be staying away
from Old World Wines. You can do very well and save a lot of money by
drinking US, Argentinian, Chilean, New Zealand and Australian wines.

--

James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland

Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not





  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-10-2010, 11:43 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,554
Default Safe Metal Levels in Wines From Italy, Brazil, Argentina

On Oct 26, 4:42*pm, "James Silverton"
wrote:
*Anders *wrote *on Tue, 26 Oct 2010 21:55:45 +0200:

"Borg Master" skrev i melding
...
Hungary and Slovakia had maximum potential THQ values over
350. France, Austria, Spain, Germany, and Portugal -- nations
that import large quantities of wine to the U.S.

You cannot import anything to another country..., you export
to it...
:-) Anders


Justified grammatical quibbles aside :-), I think I will be staying away
from Old World Wines. You can do very well and save a lot of money by
drinking US, Argentinian, Chilean, New Zealand and Australian wines.

--

James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland

Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


Not exactly a study that merits any decision making. If article below
is correct, they studied 16 wines- one from each country, with no clue
how wine was chosen.
As noted, they used a standard developed for seafood, which may or may
not be applicable to wine. As since they didn't test US, Chilean, NZ,
or Australia, using this study to determine where to drink from is a
bit ....um....speculative,.

http://www.winespectator.com/webfeat...r-Experts_4444
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-10-2010, 12:31 AM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 5,541
Default Safe Metal Levels in Wines From Italy, Brazil, Argentina


"Borg Master" wrote in message
...
Seen in passing:

Safe Metal Levels in Wines From Italy, Brazil, Argentina
Wines from three of the 15 nations studied had safe levels of heavy
metals:
Italy, Brazil, and Argentina.

Based on the maximum THQs for wines from each nation, here's the list of
the
worst offenders:

a.. Hungary
b.. Slovakia
c.. France
d.. Austria
e.. Spain
f.. Germany
g.. Portugal
h.. Greece
i.. Czech Republic
j.. Jordan
k.. Macedonia
l.. Serbia
Hungary and Slovakia had maximum potential THQ values over 350. France,
Austria, Spain, Germany, and Portugal -- nations that import large
quantities of wine to the U.S. -- had maximum potential THQ values over
100.

These data are irrelevant as you haven't posted the maximum allowed level
for each heavy metal, let alone for the combined. The European wines would
be well within the safety limits given the power of the Eurocrats!
Graham


  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-10-2010, 08:14 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 5
Default Safe Metal Levels in Wines From Italy, Brazil, Argentina

"James Silverton" wrote in message
...
Anders wrote on Tue, 26 Oct 2010 21:55:45 +0200:


"Borg Master" skrev i melding
...
Hungary and Slovakia had maximum potential THQ values over
350. France, Austria, Spain, Germany, and Portugal -- nations
that import large quantities of wine to the U.S.

You cannot import anything to another country..., you export
to it...
:-) Anders


Justified grammatical quibbles aside :-), I think I will be staying away
from Old World Wines. You can do very well and save a lot of money by
drinking US, Argentinian, Chilean, New Zealand and Australian wines.


Heavy metals can become a long term health risk if one drinks wine every
day, so it is safer and wise to skip the worse offenders.
B.M.

  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-10-2010, 02:54 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,849
Default Safe Metal Levels in Wines From Italy, Brazil, Argentina

On 10/28/10 4:46 AM, Mike Tommasi wrote:

In logic this post constitutes a hasty generalisation. The fact that one
bottle from Hungary is higher in metals, does NOT imply that hungarian
wine is dangerous.


But feel free to send all your bottles of Tokaji Aszu, preferably 6
putts and up, to me for careful... er... analysis.

Mark Lipton
(getting to the Eszencia of the problem)

--
alt.food.wine FAQ: http://winefaq.cwdjr.net
  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-10-2010, 06:08 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,554
Default Safe Metal Levels in Wines From Italy, Brazil, Argentina

On Oct 27, 3:14*pm, "Borg Master" wrote:
"James Silverton" wrote in message

...

Anders *wrote *on Tue, 26 Oct 2010 21:55:45 +0200:


"Borg Master" skrev i melding
...
Hungary and Slovakia had maximum potential THQ values over
350. France, Austria, Spain, Germany, and Portugal -- nations
that import large quantities of wine to the U.S.
You cannot import anything to another country..., you export
to it...
:-) Anders


Justified grammatical quibbles aside :-), I think I will be staying away
from Old World Wines. You can do very well and save a lot of money by
drinking US, Argentinian, Chilean, New Zealand and Australian wines.


Heavy metals can become a long term health risk if one drinks wine every
day, so it is safer and wise to skip *the worse offenders.
B.M.


But how are you determining worst offenders? From this report
( published in an "online journal", not sure if peer reviewed) There's
no clue WHAT wines were studied. Maybe one wine from Italy is free,
but another loaded. And since the study totally ignored US, NZ, Au,
are you making assumption they're somehow free- without any results?

The article I quoted had comments from someone who actually tests wine
for metals for the LCBO:

"We buy wines from Slovakia, Hungary and the Czech Republic, as well
as the usual suspects from the Old World—France, Italy, Greece," said
Soleas, who has degrees in clinical biochemistry and enology. "We buy
from 68 countries, and rarely find dangerously high levels of metals.
Maybe if we find arsenic with lead, then it's due to the use of the
two in combination in the 1980s and '90s when it was an approved
fungicide. You still get remnants of it, but it hasn't been used for
10 to 15 years. It's rare and we reject it."

Soleas said he found the study results to be "wishy-washy" based on
his experience testing wines for heavy metals and expressed
disappointment in both the way the results were published and the
extended coverage in the press. The levels of heavy metals the
scientists found, he added, are actually lower than what is allowable
in tested water reservoirs across the western world.

"Drinking water is sometimes higher in metals than these wines,"
Soleas said. "I'm not trying to minimize the fact that contaminants
get into wine, but they are targeting the wrong contaminants. Most
people will drink two glass of wine a night, but eight glasses of
water per day, and if they take a multivitamin tablet they get two
milligrams of manganese on top of that, so how is the metal obtained
from wine going to kill anyone?"


  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-10-2010, 06:38 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1,930
Default Safe Metal Levels in Wines From Italy, Brazil, Argentina

On Oct 28, 1:08*pm, DaleW wrote:
On Oct 27, 3:14*pm, "Borg Master" wrote:





"James Silverton" wrote in message


...


Anders *wrote *on Tue, 26 Oct 2010 21:55:45 +0200:


"Borg Master" skrev i melding
...
Hungary and Slovakia had maximum potential THQ values over
350. France, Austria, Spain, Germany, and Portugal -- nations
that import large quantities of wine to the U.S.
You cannot import anything to another country..., you export
to it...
:-) Anders


Justified grammatical quibbles aside :-), I think I will be staying away
from Old World Wines. You can do very well and save a lot of money by
drinking US, Argentinian, Chilean, New Zealand and Australian wines.


Heavy metals can become a long term health risk if one drinks wine every
day, so it is safer and wise to skip *the worse offenders.
B.M.


But how are you determining worst offenders? From this report
( published in an "online journal", not sure if peer reviewed) There's
no clue WHAT wines were studied. Maybe one wine *from Italy is free,
but another loaded. And since the study totally ignored US, NZ, Au,
are you making assumption they're somehow free- without any results?

The article I quoted had comments from someone who actually tests wine
for metals for the LCBO:

"We buy wines from Slovakia, Hungary and the Czech Republic, as well
as the usual suspects from the Old World—France, Italy, Greece," said
Soleas, who has degrees in clinical biochemistry and enology. "We buy
from 68 countries, and rarely find dangerously high levels of metals.
Maybe if we find arsenic with lead, then it's due to the use of the
two in combination in the 1980s and '90s when it was an approved
fungicide. You still get remnants of it, but it hasn't been used for
10 to 15 years. It's rare and we reject it."

Soleas said he found the study results to be "wishy-washy" based on
his experience testing wines for heavy metals and expressed
disappointment in both the way the results were published and the
extended coverage in the press. The levels of heavy metals the
scientists found, he added, are actually lower than what is allowable
in tested water reservoirs across the western world.

"Drinking water is sometimes higher in metals than these wines,"
Soleas said. "I'm not trying to minimize the fact that contaminants
get into wine, but they are targeting the wrong contaminants. Most
people will drink two glass of wine a night, but eight glasses of
water per day, and if they take a multivitamin tablet they get two
milligrams of manganese on top of that, so how is the metal obtained
from wine going to kill anyone?"- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


This is why I still love reading AFW. So many folks with a real
passion for and the skills set to debunk myths and innuendo.
  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-10-2010, 08:07 PM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 5
Default Safe Metal Levels in Wines From Italy, Brazil, Argentina

"Bi!!" wrote in message
...
On Oct 28, 1:08 pm, DaleW wrote:
On Oct 27, 3:14 pm, "Borg Master" wrote:





"James Silverton" wrote in message


...


Anders wrote on Tue, 26 Oct 2010 21:55:45 +0200:


"Borg Master" skrev i melding
...
Hungary and Slovakia had maximum potential THQ values over
350. France, Austria, Spain, Germany, and Portugal -- nations
that import large quantities of wine to the U.S.
You cannot import anything to another country..., you export
to it...
:-) Anders


Justified grammatical quibbles aside :-), I think I will be staying
away
from Old World Wines. You can do very well and save a lot of money by
drinking US, Argentinian, Chilean, New Zealand and Australian wines.


Heavy metals can become a long term health risk if one drinks wine every
day, so it is safer and wise to skip the worse offenders.
B.M.


But how are you determining worst offenders? From this report
( published in an "online journal", not sure if peer reviewed) There's
no clue WHAT wines were studied. Maybe one wine from Italy is free,
but another loaded. And since the study totally ignored US, NZ, Au,
are you making assumption they're somehow free- without any results?

The article I quoted had comments from someone who actually tests wine
for metals for the LCBO:

"We buy wines from Slovakia, Hungary and the Czech Republic, as well
as the usual suspects from the Old World—France, Italy, Greece," said
Soleas, who has degrees in clinical biochemistry and enology. "We buy
from 68 countries, and rarely find dangerously high levels of metals.
Maybe if we find arsenic with lead, then it's due to the use of the
two in combination in the 1980s and '90s when it was an approved
fungicide. You still get remnants of it, but it hasn't been used for
10 to 15 years. It's rare and we reject it."

Soleas said he found the study results to be "wishy-washy" based on
his experience testing wines for heavy metals and expressed
disappointment in both the way the results were published and the
extended coverage in the press. The levels of heavy metals the
scientists found, he added, are actually lower than what is allowable
in tested water reservoirs across the western world.

"Drinking water is sometimes higher in metals than these wines,"
Soleas said. "I'm not trying to minimize the fact that contaminants
get into wine, but they are targeting the wrong contaminants. Most
people will drink two glass of wine a night, but eight glasses of
water per day, and if they take a multivitamin tablet they get two
milligrams of manganese on top of that, so how is the metal obtained
from wine going to kill anyone?"- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


~This is why I still love reading AFW. So many folks with a real
~passion for and the skills set to debunk myths and innuendo.


I say it's still worth considering, it's the accumulative effect over many
years that can cause the problems.
Parkinson's disease, cancer, etc.
http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/fo...-found-in-wine
"If you buy a bottle of wine, the only thing it tells you on the label is
the amount of alcohol. I like the idea of labeling wines with the amounts of
heavy metals they contain. Many wines don't have these metals. So let
customers vote by choice whether they want the heavy metals", Naughton said
to WebMD."

So if a country has a lower contamination rate its seems sensible to
purchase wines overall from those countries.

http://www.decanter.com/news/wine-ne...se-health-risk
And sensibly...."Professor Declan Naughton, co-author of the report, called
for consumers to be made aware of the risks. ‘Levels of metal ions should
appear on wine labels,’ he said, ‘along with the introduction of further
steps to remove key hazardous metal ions during wine production."
Wise move!

B.M.


  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-11-2010, 12:21 AM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 5
Default Safe Metal Levels in Wines From Italy, Brazil, Argentina

"Mike Tommasi" wrote in message
...
On 27/10/2010 21:14, Borg Master wrote:
"James Silverton" wrote in message
...
Anders wrote on Tue, 26 Oct 2010 21:55:45 +0200:


"Borg Master" skrev i melding
...
Hungary and Slovakia had maximum potential THQ values over
350. France, Austria, Spain, Germany, and Portugal -- nations
that import large quantities of wine to the U.S.
You cannot import anything to another country..., you export
to it...
:-) Anders

Justified grammatical quibbles aside :-), I think I will be staying
away from Old World Wines. You can do very well and save a lot of
money by drinking US, Argentinian, Chilean, New Zealand and Australian
wines.


Heavy metals can become a long term health risk if one drinks wine every
day, so it is safer and wise to skip the worse offenders.
B.M.


Water contains heavy metals too.

In logic this post constitutes a hasty generalisation. The fact that one
bottle from Hungary is higher in metals, does NOT imply that hungarian
wine is dangerous.


Perhaps they will try another bottle or two [or maybe they did?] and just
see what the result's are.








Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
"Very few wines made today in Italy, Spain, Portugal, Greece,Australia, Germany, Chile and Argentina, among other countries...taste theway they did 50 years ago." [email protected] Wine 5 19-02-2017 10:14 AM
TN: Inside wines, outside wines - Loire, Beaujolais, Chablis, Argentina DaleW Wine 0 17-07-2014 07:07 PM
"Traditionally, Old World wines tend to be earthier, with loweralcohol levels and higher acidity, while New World wines tend to be morefruit-forward with lower acidity and higher alcohol levels." aesthete8 Wine 0 08-08-2010 04:53 AM
Fruit Wines and Acid levels Tim[_11_] Winemaking 4 20-04-2009 02:46 AM
Wines of Argentina George Rothman Wine 1 27-01-2005 07:24 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 10:54 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2021 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017