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Old 14-05-2008, 06:15 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Wine Suggestions Please ? (non-Merlot's)

Hello,

Know nothing about wines, frankly.

Previously I got a friend a Merlot wine for cooking.
Loves it.

Would like to expand his horizons in cooking wines a bit.

Might anyone please suggest other, non-Merlot's, for under perhaps $12 or so
for him to try also ?

Do they use white wines for cooking (much) ?

Thanks,
Bob



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Old 14-05-2008, 07:34 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Posts: 365
Default Wine Suggestions Please ? (non-Merlot's)

Hello

Welcome to the wine group.
I think it would help if you told us where you are posting from,
geographically, in case you want some specifc ecommendations - it helps if
the wines are available.
For dry cooking wines I think a basic rule is that they should not be oaked,
or at least, not obtrusively so.
A Cote-du-Rhone might be useful. They tend to be cheapish, and not heavily
oaked. Also they are as arule not tannic which is a bonus.

And, yes, white wine is used in cooking - in sauces with fish, in risotto,
in specific dishes like Coq au Riesling and Baeckoffe, mussle soup,
spaghetthi sauce - a bottle of dry white comes in handy quite often. Here
the frist rule also applies - do not use a very oaked wine. In the case of
Coq au RIesling (rooster in RIesling) it stands to reason that the wine used
should be a Riesling, of the Alsatian type, meaning, dry and fruity. For
fish sauces e g an unoaked Chard might do, or a Muscadet, which is never
unoaked.

Please understand that I oversimplify, slightly - this is for didactic
purposes, and many will no doubt point out that Alsatian Rieslings are
getting more sweet by the year, and that it can be the done thing to use a
very tannic wine indeed (like beef braised in Barolo) in cooking, but you
have to start somewhere ...

Good luck

Nils

"Robert11" skrev i meddelandet
...
Hello,

Know nothing about wines, frankly.

Previously I got a friend a Merlot wine for cooking.
Loves it.

Would like to expand his horizons in cooking wines a bit.

Might anyone please suggest other, non-Merlot's, for under perhaps $12 or
so for him to try also ?

Do they use white wines for cooking (much) ?

Thanks,
Bob


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Old 16-05-2008, 12:53 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 4
Default To Nils From OP Wine Suggestions Please ? (non-Merlot's)

Hi Nils,

I live just outside of Boston, Mass.

Much thanks for help, reallyt appreciate it.
Sure is a lot to know !

A little confused over which are the relatively inexpensive cooking white
wines to try that you suggest ?
Could you perhaps just give me the brand names of a few reds, and a few
whites in a short list ?
That would make it a lot easier for a real beginner like me.

Regards, and thanks again,
Bob

-----------------
"Nils Gustaf Lindgren" wrote in message
...
Hello

Welcome to the wine group.
I think it would help if you told us where you are posting from,
geographically, in case you want some specifc ecommendations - it helps if
the wines are available.
For dry cooking wines I think a basic rule is that they should not be
oaked, or at least, not obtrusively so.
A Cote-du-Rhone might be useful. They tend to be cheapish, and not heavily
oaked. Also they are as arule not tannic which is a bonus.

And, yes, white wine is used in cooking - in sauces with fish, in risotto,
in specific dishes like Coq au Riesling and Baeckoffe, mussle soup,
spaghetthi sauce - a bottle of dry white comes in handy quite often. Here
the frist rule also applies - do not use a very oaked wine. In the case of
Coq au RIesling (rooster in RIesling) it stands to reason that the wine
used should be a Riesling, of the Alsatian type, meaning, dry and fruity.
For fish sauces e g an unoaked Chard might do, or a Muscadet, which is
never unoaked.

Please understand that I oversimplify, slightly - this is for didactic
purposes, and many will no doubt point out that Alsatian Rieslings are
getting more sweet by the year, and that it can be the done thing to use a
very tannic wine indeed (like beef braised in Barolo) in cooking, but you
have to start somewhere ...

Good luck

Nils

"Robert11" skrev i meddelandet
...
Hello,

Know nothing about wines, frankly.

Previously I got a friend a Merlot wine for cooking.
Loves it.

Would like to expand his horizons in cooking wines a bit.

Might anyone please suggest other, non-Merlot's, for under perhaps $12 or
so for him to try also ?

Do they use white wines for cooking (much) ?

Thanks,
Bob




  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 16-05-2008, 01:21 AM posted to alt.food.wine
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 7
Default To Nils From OP Wine Suggestions Please ? (non-Merlot's)

I question your statement "Alsatian Rieslings are getting more sweet by the
year". I do not believe that it is more RS but more fruit you are tasting.
For the past several years I spend some time in Alsace each October and have
learned to distinguish fruit from RS.

"Robert11" wrote in message
. ..
Hi Nils,

I live just outside of Boston, Mass.

Much thanks for help, reallyt appreciate it.
Sure is a lot to know !

A little confused over which are the relatively inexpensive cooking white
wines to try that you suggest ?
Could you perhaps just give me the brand names of a few reds, and a few
whites in a short list ?
That would make it a lot easier for a real beginner like me.

Regards, and thanks again,
Bob

-----------------
"Nils Gustaf Lindgren" wrote in message
...
Hello

Welcome to the wine group.
I think it would help if you told us where you are posting from,
geographically, in case you want some specifc ecommendations - it helps
if the wines are available.
For dry cooking wines I think a basic rule is that they should not be
oaked, or at least, not obtrusively so.
A Cote-du-Rhone might be useful. They tend to be cheapish, and not
heavily oaked. Also they are as arule not tannic which is a bonus.

And, yes, white wine is used in cooking - in sauces with fish, in
risotto, in specific dishes like Coq au Riesling and Baeckoffe, mussle
soup, spaghetthi sauce - a bottle of dry white comes in handy quite
often. Here the frist rule also applies - do not use a very oaked wine.
In the case of Coq au RIesling (rooster in RIesling) it stands to reason
that the wine used should be a Riesling, of the Alsatian type, meaning,
dry and fruity. For fish sauces e g an unoaked Chard might do, or a
Muscadet, which is never unoaked.

Please understand that I oversimplify, slightly - this is for didactic
purposes, and many will no doubt point out that Alsatian Rieslings are
getting more sweet by the year, and that it can be the done thing to use
a very tannic wine indeed (like beef braised in Barolo) in cooking, but
you have to start somewhere ...

Good luck

Nils

"Robert11" skrev i meddelandet
...
Hello,

Know nothing about wines, frankly.

Previously I got a friend a Merlot wine for cooking.
Loves it.

Would like to expand his horizons in cooking wines a bit.

Might anyone please suggest other, non-Merlot's, for under perhaps $12
or so for him to try also ?

Do they use white wines for cooking (much) ?

Thanks,
Bob






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Old 16-05-2008, 03:09 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 153
Default To Nils From OP Wine Suggestions Please ? (non-Merlot's)

"Robert11" wrote in
:

Hi Nils,

I live just outside of Boston, Mass.

Much thanks for help, reallyt appreciate it.
Sure is a lot to know !

A little confused over which are the relatively inexpensive cooking
white wines to try that you suggest ?
Could you perhaps just give me the brand names of a few reds, and a
few whites in a short list ?
That would make it a lot easier for a real beginner like me.

Regards, and thanks again,
Bob

-----------------


Since Nils is in Sweden it would be hard for him to make the list for which
you ask. For a Cote du Rhone that is readily available look to Perrin
Reserve or Parallel 45.



--
Joseph Coulter, cruises and vacations
www.josephcoulter.com

877 832 2021
904 631 8863 cell




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Old 16-05-2008, 09:05 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 365
Default To Nils From OP Wine Suggestions Please ? (non-Merlot's)

Hello
I too visit Alsace on a regular basis, and I have discussed this with a few
professionals (Bruno Sorg in Eguisheim,Baur in Turckheim, a cavist in
Colmar) and I feel fairly convinced that, even though you are right about
there being more fruit, on the one hand it is getting increasingly dificult
to make a real dry Riesling (or any other varietal wine), some (as Sorg)
actively promote a higher degree of residual sugar. That said, I have also,
as you correctly point out, tasted a Riesling which gave the appearance of
being sweet-ish, while only having 3 g/L RS.

Cheers

Nils

"Si Beer" skrev i meddelandet
. ..
I question your statement "Alsatian Rieslings are getting more sweet by the
year". I do not believe that it is more RS but more fruit you are tasting.
For the past several years I spend some time in Alsace each October and
have learned to distinguish fruit from RS.

"Robert11" wrote in message
. ..
Hi Nils,

I live just outside of Boston, Mass.

Much thanks for help, reallyt appreciate it.
Sure is a lot to know !

A little confused over which are the relatively inexpensive cooking white
wines to try that you suggest ?
Could you perhaps just give me the brand names of a few reds, and a few
whites in a short list ?
That would make it a lot easier for a real beginner like me.

Regards, and thanks again,
Bob

-----------------
"Nils Gustaf Lindgren" wrote in
message ...
Hello

Welcome to the wine group.
I think it would help if you told us where you are posting from,
geographically, in case you want some specifc ecommendations - it helps
if the wines are available.
For dry cooking wines I think a basic rule is that they should not be
oaked, or at least, not obtrusively so.
A Cote-du-Rhone might be useful. They tend to be cheapish, and not
heavily oaked. Also they are as arule not tannic which is a bonus.

And, yes, white wine is used in cooking - in sauces with fish, in
risotto, in specific dishes like Coq au Riesling and Baeckoffe, mussle
soup, spaghetthi sauce - a bottle of dry white comes in handy quite
often. Here the frist rule also applies - do not use a very oaked wine.
In the case of Coq au RIesling (rooster in RIesling) it stands to reason
that the wine used should be a Riesling, of the Alsatian type, meaning,
dry and fruity. For fish sauces e g an unoaked Chard might do, or a
Muscadet, which is never unoaked.

Please understand that I oversimplify, slightly - this is for didactic
purposes, and many will no doubt point out that Alsatian Rieslings are
getting more sweet by the year, and that it can be the done thing to use
a very tannic wine indeed (like beef braised in Barolo) in cooking, but
you have to start somewhere ...

Good luck

Nils

"Robert11" skrev i meddelandet
...
Hello,

Know nothing about wines, frankly.

Previously I got a friend a Merlot wine for cooking.
Loves it.

Would like to expand his horizons in cooking wines a bit.

Might anyone please suggest other, non-Merlot's, for under perhaps $12
or so for him to try also ?

Do they use white wines for cooking (much) ?

Thanks,
Bob








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Old 16-05-2008, 02:58 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,554
Default To Nils From OP Wine Suggestions Please ? (non-Merlot's)

On May 15, 8:21�pm, "Si Beer" wrote:
I question your statement "Alsatian Rieslings are getting more sweet by the
year". I do not believe that it is more RS but more fruit you are tasting.
For the past several years I spend some time in Alsace each October and have
learned to distinguish fruit from RS.

"Robert11" wrote in message

. ..



Hi Nils,


I live just outside of Boston, Mass.


Much thanks for help, reallyt appreciate it.
Sure is a lot to know !


A little confused over which are the relatively inexpensive cooking white
wines to try that you suggest ?
Could you perhaps just give me the brand names of a few reds, and a few
whites in a short list ?
That would make it a lot easier for a real beginner like me.


Regards, and thanks again,
Bob


-----------------
"Nils Gustaf Lindgren" wrote in message
...
Hello


Welcome to the wine group.
I think it would help if you told us where you are posting from,
geographically, in case you want some specifc ecommendations - it helps
if the wines are available.
For dry cooking wines I think a basic rule is that they should not be
oaked, or at least, not obtrusively so.
A Cote-du-Rhone might be useful. They tend to be cheapish, and not
heavily oaked. Also they are as arule not tannic which is a bonus.


And, yes, white wine is used in cooking - in sauces with fish, in
risotto, in specific dishes like Coq au Riesling and Baeckoffe, mussle
soup, spaghetthi sauce - a bottle of dry white comes in handy quite
often. Here the frist rule also applies - do not use a very oaked wine.
In the case of Coq au RIesling (rooster in RIesling) it stands to reason
that the wine used should be a Riesling, of the Alsatian type, meaning,
dry and fruity. For fish sauces e g an unoaked Chard might do, or a
Muscadet, which is never unoaked.


Please understand that I oversimplify, slightly - this is for didactic
purposes, and many will no doubt point out that Alsatian Rieslings are
getting more sweet by the year, and that it can be the done thing to use
a very tannic wine indeed (like beef braised in Barolo) in cooking, but
you have to start somewhere ...


Good luck


Nils


"Robert11" skrev i meddelandet
...
Hello,


Know nothing about wines, frankly.


Previously I got a friend a Merlot wine for cooking.
Loves it.


Would like to expand his horizons in cooking wines a bit.


Might anyone please suggest other, non-Merlot's, for under perhaps $12
or so for him to try also ?


Do they use white wines for cooking (much) ?


Thanks,
Bob- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


While it is certainly possible that as vintages have tended towards
the riper/hotter, there is "more fruit" in Alsace Rieslings, it's hard
to deny that there is waaaay more RS than in the past. In early '90s
Olivier Humbrecht was an outlier as most of his Rieslings weren't
really dry. Now it is the Trimbachs who seem the non-conventional ones
as all there non-late designated wines are totally dry.
I do appreciate ZHs sweetness indice, it's the not knowing what is in
bottle that bothers me the most.
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Old 16-05-2008, 11:06 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 33
Default Wine Suggestions Please ? (non-Merlot's)

For whites, try Kenwood Sauvignon Blanc. They've started adding a
little Chardonnay for body and it makes a great wine to poach mussels
or make risotti. Should be in the $10 range. If I'm not drinking
really expensive wine, and I'm just using a little, like a splash to
deglaze a pot, I just use some of what I'm drinking.

Jim

On 2008-05-15 16:53:41 -0700, "Robert11" said:

Hi Nils,

I live just outside of Boston, Mass.

Much thanks for help, reallyt appreciate it.
Sure is a lot to know !

A little confused over which are the relatively inexpensive cooking white
wines to try that you suggest ?
Could you perhaps just give me the brand names of a few reds, and a few
whites in a short list ?
That would make it a lot easier for a real beginner like me.

Regards, and thanks again,
Bob

-----------------
"Nils Gustaf Lindgren" wrote in message
...
Hello

Welcome to the wine group.
I think it would help if you told us where you are posting from,
geographically, in case you want some specifc ecommendations - it helps if
the wines are available.
For dry cooking wines I think a basic rule is that they should not be
oaked, or at least, not obtrusively so.
A Cote-du-Rhone might be useful. They tend to be cheapish, and not heavily
oaked. Also they are as arule not tannic which is a bonus.

And, yes, white wine is used in cooking - in sauces with fish, in risotto,
in specific dishes like Coq au Riesling and Baeckoffe, mussle soup,
spaghetthi sauce - a bottle of dry white comes in handy quite often. Here
the frist rule also applies - do not use a very oaked wine. In the case of
Coq au RIesling (rooster in RIesling) it stands to reason that the wine
used should be a Riesling, of the Alsatian type, meaning, dry and fruity.
For fish sauces e g an unoaked Chard might do, or a Muscadet, which is
never unoaked.

Please understand that I oversimplify, slightly - this is for didactic
purposes, and many will no doubt point out that Alsatian Rieslings are
getting more sweet by the year, and that it can be the done thing to use a
very tannic wine indeed (like beef braised in Barolo) in cooking, but you
have to start somewhere ...

Good luck

Nils

"Robert11" skrev i meddelandet
...
Hello,

Know nothing about wines, frankly.

Previously I got a friend a Merlot wine for cooking.
Loves it.

Would like to expand his horizons in cooking wines a bit.

Might anyone please suggest other, non-Merlot's, for under perhaps $12 or
so for him to try also ?

Do they use white wines for cooking (much) ?

Thanks,
Bob





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