Tea (rec.drink.tea) Discussion relating to tea, the world's second most consumed beverage (after water), made by infusing or boiling the leaves of the tea plant (C. sinensis or close relatives) in water.

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Old 07-12-2007, 07:07 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default How can you tell if tea has caffeine?

How can you determine if tea contains caffeine if the label does not
indicate either way? Are there any ingredients that I can look for to
determine this?

Thanks.

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Old 07-12-2007, 08:38 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default How can you tell if tea has caffeine?

if they test that batch before packing and put the test result on the
label

which i've never seen. and it would be expensive and time waste for
the tea company.

caffeine is caffeine

usually hope that black tea has more caffeine, but YMMV
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Old 07-12-2007, 09:27 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default How can you tell if tea has caffeine?

wrote:
How can you determine if tea contains caffeine if the label does not
indicate either way? Are there any ingredients that I can look for to
determine this?


Tea has one ingredient: tea. If it contains tea, it contains caffeine
unless a process has been used to specifically remove it. If it does
not contain tea, it is not a tea at all but a tisane.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
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Old 08-12-2007, 08:15 AM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default How can you tell if tea has caffeine?

On Dec 7, 1:07 pm, wrote:
How can you determine if tea contains caffeine if the label does not
indicate either way? Are there any ingredients that I can look for to
determine this?

Thanks.


I have understood that tea with a lot ot tips has more caffeine.
Toci
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Old 08-12-2007, 12:57 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default How can you tell if tea has caffeine?


wrote in message
...
How can you determine if tea contains caffeine if the label does not
indicate either way? Are there any ingredients that I can look for to
determine this?

Thanks.


It contains caffeine if there's no indication that it's decaffeinated.


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Old 08-12-2007, 04:52 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default How can you tell if tea has caffeine?

On Dec 7, 2:07 pm, wrote:
How can you determine if tea contains caffeine if the label does not
indicate either way? Are there any ingredients that I can look for to
determine this?

Thanks.


If it's a green, black, oolong, white (or any other kinds of TEA
varieties), it will have caffeine. If it does not have caffeine, it
will say so explicitly on the label (and even then, there are probably
traces of caffeine)

If it's an herbal or rooibos blend, then it is caffeine free. Anything
fruity is generally caffeine free as well. Of course, if it is
combined with a green, black, etc. then it will have some caffeine.

Generally, tea bags will make a big deal if something is caffeine free
(Celestial Seasonings and Tazo I know do this). If they don't mention
it, it probably isn't.

Remember that you can easily "decaffeinate" any tea by steeping it for
a minute and pouring off the contents. The next cup you steep will
have 65-80% less caffeine (the numbers get kinda screwy here, but
that's the general idea). I don't recommend doing this, though, as you
will lose a lot of the flavor if it's a flavored tea.
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Old 08-12-2007, 05:43 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default How can you tell if tea has caffeine?


wrote in message
...
On Dec 7, 2:07 pm, wrote:
How can you determine if tea contains caffeine if the label does not
indicate either way? Are there any ingredients that I can look for to
determine this?

Thanks.


If it's a green, black, oolong, white (or any other kinds of TEA
varieties), it will have caffeine. If it does not have caffeine, it
will say so explicitly on the label (and even then, there are probably
traces of caffeine)

If it's an herbal or rooibos blend,...


It isn't tea because it didn't come from the Camilla sinensis "tea" plant.

...then it is caffeine free.


Unless it's Yerba mate which has caffeine.

Remember that you can easily "decaffeinate" any tea by steeping it for
a minute...


After 30 seconds, you lose too much flavor for practically no additional
benefit.

The last time I mentioned DIY decaffeination, I got jumped for propagating a
myth. I still don't understand it because, not only is it fairly common
knowledge by now among tea people, the first time I heard about it, I was
told the name of the man who discovered it and that there was a website.
Since that was about 10 years ago, there's no way I can remember the details
of who discovered it or the URL and the man who told me about it, a former
instructor, has since died so I can't go back to him and ask.

So, now I'm in the position of wondering if the myth about DIY
decaffeinating is a myth since apparently anybody can put up a webpage with
the scientific basis for whatever's being touted.

"I know it's true; I read it on the Internet!"

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Old 08-12-2007, 06:03 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default How can you tell if tea has caffeine?

So, now I'm in the position of wondering if the myth about DIY
decaffeinating is a myth since apparently anybody can put up a webpage with
the scientific basis for whatever's being touted.

"I know it's true; I read it on the Internet!"


The difference is that there are published journal articles in support
of the fact that DIY decaffeination is a myth.

I refer you he http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=2477703

"The overall average caffeine released in the first through third
brews were 69%, 23%, and 8%, respectively." Though it doesn't say so
in the abstract available at the link above, in the full article it is
said that the infusions were 5 minutes each. So... if 5 minutes
removes 69%, how much do you really think 30 seconds will?

-Brent
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Old 08-12-2007, 06:22 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default How can you tell if tea has caffeine?


"Brent" wrote in message
...
So, now I'm in the position of wondering if the myth about DIY
decaffeinating is a myth since apparently anybody can put up a webpage

with
the scientific basis for whatever's being touted.

"I know it's true; I read it on the Internet!"


The difference is that there are published journal articles in support
of the fact that DIY decaffeination is a myth.

I refer you he http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=2477703

"The overall average caffeine released in the first through third
brews were 69%, 23%, and 8%, respectively." Though it doesn't say so
in the abstract available at the link above, in the full article it is
said that the infusions were 5 minutes each. So... if 5 minutes
removes 69%, how much do you really think 30 seconds will?


Logically, not enough to matter.

Thanks for the link and the info about the 5-minute steep. Did you notice
the next lines?

"Three cups of tea brewed using three tea bags (Western culture) have
approximately twice the amount of methylxanthines as the same volume
prepared by three successive brews of loose tea leaves (Asian culture). "

Does the full article address the reason for the doubled amount of
methylxanthines? That's a curiosity since the volume and steep time were the
same for both cultural preparations.

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Old 08-12-2007, 06:51 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default How can you tell if tea has caffeine?

The paper doesn't really give a reason, just notes that there is a
difference. They are using bagged teas vs. loose leaf, though, so one
might suspect that the extra surface area to volume ratio of tea bag
fannings would be the culprit.

-Brent


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Old 08-12-2007, 07:10 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default How can you tell if tea has caffeine?

Okay, thanks.

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"Brent" wrote in message
...
The paper doesn't really give a reason, just notes that there is a
difference. They are using bagged teas vs. loose leaf, though, so one
might suspect that the extra surface area to volume ratio of tea bag
fannings would be the culprit.

-Brent



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Old 08-12-2007, 08:54 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default How can you tell if tea has caffeine?

On Dec 8, 12:43 pm, "Bluesea" wrote:
wrote in message

...

On Dec 7, 2:07 pm, wrote:
How can you determine if tea contains caffeine if the label does not
indicate either way? Are there any ingredients that I can look for to
determine this?


Thanks.


If it's a green, black, oolong, white (or any other kinds of TEA
varieties), it will have caffeine. If it does not have caffeine, it
will say so explicitly on the label (and even then, there are probably
traces of caffeine)


If it's an herbal or rooibos blend,...


It isn't tea because it didn't come from the Camilla sinensis "tea" plant.

...then it is caffeine free.


Unless it's Yerba mate which has caffeine.

Remember that you can easily "decaffeinate" any tea by steeping it for
a minute...


After 30 seconds, you lose too much flavor for practically no additional
benefit.

The last time I mentioned DIY decaffeination, I got jumped for propagating a
myth. I still don't understand it because, not only is it fairly common
knowledge by now among tea people, the first time I heard about it, I was
told the name of the man who discovered it and that there was a website.
Since that was about 10 years ago, there's no way I can remember the details
of who discovered it or the URL and the man who told me about it, a former
instructor, has since died so I can't go back to him and ask.

So, now I'm in the position of wondering if the myth about DIY
decaffeinating is a myth since apparently anybody can put up a webpage with
the scientific basis for whatever's being touted.


I think this is a more complex issue than just the caffeine, there are
other
stimulants in tea (I believe at least two other ones). Green and white
and
oolong teas can have as much or more caffeine than blacks, but blacks
have a far different 'buzz' (and stronger) than the other teas, as far
as I can tell.
There are a huge number of variables that may affect this. The
difference in
taste itself can have a stimulating effect. The difference in aroma
may have
an effect as well. Various non-stimulating chemicals may have effect
on how
stimulants are absorbed. The ratio of the three stimulants may have an
effect too.

As far as I'm concerned, second, third, etc steeps make tea with
notably
less stimulating effect but also not as tasty, unless you're talking
about
gong-fu method. I usually don't bother. I'm so used to white and green
tea
that I don't get any stimulating effect from 8-9 oz, and the first
steep
tastes much better to me, even for very good teas, although it may be
that I use less leaf than is common..


"I know it's true; I read it on the Internet!"

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Old 08-12-2007, 10:21 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default How can you tell if tea has caffeine?

"The overall average caffeine released in the first through third
brews were 69%, 23%, and 8%, respectively." Though it doesn't say so
in the abstract available at the link above, in the full article it is
said that the infusions were 5 minutes each. So... if 5 minutes
removes 69%, how much do you really think 30 seconds will?


good point. If they used bagged tea that means that even less will be
released in loose leaf in the same period.


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Old 08-12-2007, 10:44 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default How can you tell if tea has caffeine?

On Dec 8, 10:21 pm, "Slint Flig" wrote:
"The overall average caffeine released in the first through third
brews were 69%, 23%, and 8%, respectively." Though it doesn't say so
in the abstract available at the link above, in the full article it is
said that the infusions were 5 minutes each. So... if 5 minutes
removes 69%, how much do you really think 30 seconds will?


good point. If they used bagged tea that means that even less will be
released in loose leaf in the same period.


I am very puzzled about the origin of the "30 second" myth too.

I read about another study which uses hot water decaffeination, but
using semi-processed leaves, which are then pan roasted later. Now
that is real decaffenation that not only removes caffeine but keep the
nutrients intact.

By the way caffeine is good for you so a few cups a day do an awful
good....

Oops! Did I just say that?

Julian
http://www.amazing-green-tea.com
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Old 08-12-2007, 11:19 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default How can you tell if tea has caffeine?

"Bluesea" writes:

"Brent" wrote in message
...
[...]
I refer you he http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=2477703

"The overall average caffeine released in the first through third
brews were 69%, 23%, and 8%, respectively." Though it doesn't say so
in the abstract available at the link above, in the full article it is
said that the infusions were 5 minutes each. So... if 5 minutes
removes 69%, how much do you really think 30 seconds will?


Logically, not enough to matter.

Thanks for the link and the info about the 5-minute steep. Did you notice
the next lines?

"Three cups of tea brewed using three tea bags (Western culture) have
approximately twice the amount of methylxanthines as the same volume
prepared by three successive brews of loose tea leaves (Asian culture). "

Does the full article address the reason for the doubled amount of
methylxanthines? That's a curiosity since the volume and steep time were the
same for both cultural preparations.


All I have is the same abstract you quote, but I interpret the
language differently. I think they're talking about using a new (I
almost said "fresh") teabag for each steep in the Western trials, but
*resteeping* the loose leaves in the Asian trials. It's no mystery
when you parse it this way.

/Lew
---
Lew Perin /
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html


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