Sushi (alt.food.sushi) For talking sushi. (Sashimi, wasabi, miso soup, and other elements of the sushi experience are valid topics.) Sushi is a broad topic; discussions range from preparation to methods of eating to favorite kinds to good restaurants.

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Default Sushi variant in LA

My wife and I visited Los Angeles for 6 days for a convention and just came
back home.
My daughter who lives in LA assured us to have a dinner at the best Sushi
restaurant in LA.
The name of the restaurant was "Koi", located in Beverly Hill.
The restaurant is quite dark and very nicely designed.
The restaurant was then almost full but the most of customers were
non-Asians!!!
Then, I sensed that we came to a wrong place to eat Sushi.
After having the dinner, I told my daughter that I would never come to this
restaurant again.
My disappointment was that those Sushi was not authentic.
I would say they were more likely an Americanized Sushi or a Sushi mutant
for non-Japanese.
Including tips, it cost me $190 for three of us.
My wife said that I now know why we need Sushi Policeman to certify the
autentic Sushi.
For my wife and I, this was the worst Japanese Sushi that we have ever had.
My daughter was born in the US and still hard to distinguish between
authentic and non-authentic Sushi.
BTW, I am not criticizing the Koi restaurant because its purpose seems to
serve non-Asians.
Ramon



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Default Sushi variant in LA


"Roman King" > wrote in message
...
> My wife and I visited Los Angeles for 6 days for a convention and just

came
> back home.
> My daughter who lives in LA assured us to have a dinner at the best Sushi
> restaurant in LA.
> The name of the restaurant was "Koi", located in Beverly Hill.
> The restaurant is quite dark and very nicely designed.
> The restaurant was then almost full but the most of customers were
> non-Asians!!!


That alone doesn't mean much. The top traditional Japanese sushi restaurants
in Midtown Manhattan
are always packed with "non-asians"* but their quality is top notch.
BTW, "non-Japanese" would make alot more sense, no?
For the most part non-Japanese Asians are going out for "Japanese cuisine"
when
they go out for sushi. Just like like all other non-Asian customers,
Japanese cuisine
is not part of their culture and something they are used to.

> Then, I sensed that we came to a wrong place to eat Sushi.
> After having the dinner, I told my daughter that I would never come to

this
> restaurant again.
> My disappointment was that those Sushi was not authentic.
> I would say they were more likely an Americanized Sushi or a Sushi mutant
> for non-Japanese.
> Including tips, it cost me $190 for three of us.
> My wife said that I now know why we need Sushi Policeman to certify the
> autentic Sushi.
> For my wife and I, this was the worst Japanese Sushi that we have ever

had.
> My daughter was born in the US and still hard to distinguish between
> authentic and non-authentic Sushi.
> BTW, I am not criticizing the Koi restaurant because its purpose seems to
> serve non-Asians.
> Ramon
>


I think you are mixing the term "authentic" with "traditional".
You seem to have run into a restaurant which specializes in non-traditional
American or Fusion-type sushi. And clearly that didn't meet your tastes.
As a traditionalist I also avoid such places. Including, amazingly some
fusion-type
Sushi now found in even in Japan.
Musashi



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Default Sushi variant in LA

Musashi,

I agree with you that I was mixed up traditional with authentic.
We like traditional sushi.
What surprised me was that the first dish the waiter brought us without
Wasabi.
I complained to him about it. That really ****ed me off hell..
Ramond



"Musashi" > wrote in message
. ..
>
> "Roman King" > wrote in message
> ...
>> My wife and I visited Los Angeles for 6 days for a convention and just

> came
>> back home.
>> My daughter who lives in LA assured us to have a dinner at the best Sushi
>> restaurant in LA.
>> The name of the restaurant was "Koi", located in Beverly Hill.
>> The restaurant is quite dark and very nicely designed.
>> The restaurant was then almost full but the most of customers were
>> non-Asians!!!

>
> That alone doesn't mean much. The top traditional Japanese sushi
> restaurants
> in Midtown Manhattan
> are always packed with "non-asians"* but their quality is top notch.
> BTW, "non-Japanese" would make alot more sense, no?
> For the most part non-Japanese Asians are going out for "Japanese cuisine"
> when
> they go out for sushi. Just like like all other non-Asian customers,
> Japanese cuisine
> is not part of their culture and something they are used to.
>
>> Then, I sensed that we came to a wrong place to eat Sushi.
>> After having the dinner, I told my daughter that I would never come to

> this
>> restaurant again.
>> My disappointment was that those Sushi was not authentic.
>> I would say they were more likely an Americanized Sushi or a Sushi mutant
>> for non-Japanese.
>> Including tips, it cost me $190 for three of us.
>> My wife said that I now know why we need Sushi Policeman to certify the
>> autentic Sushi.
>> For my wife and I, this was the worst Japanese Sushi that we have ever

> had.
>> My daughter was born in the US and still hard to distinguish between
>> authentic and non-authentic Sushi.
>> BTW, I am not criticizing the Koi restaurant because its purpose seems to
>> serve non-Asians.
>> Ramon
>>

>
> I think you are mixing the term "authentic" with "traditional".
> You seem to have run into a restaurant which specializes in
> non-traditional
> American or Fusion-type sushi. And clearly that didn't meet your tastes.
> As a traditionalist I also avoid such places. Including, amazingly some
> fusion-type
> Sushi now found in even in Japan.
> Musashi
>
>
>



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Default Sushi variant in LA

"Roman" > wrote:
> Musashi,
>
> I agree with you that I was mixed up traditional with authentic.
> We like traditional sushi.
> What surprised me was that the first dish the waiter brought us without
> Wasabi.
> I complained to him about it. That really ****ed me off hell..
> Ramond


I primarily eat sashimi muriowase at Asanebo in Studio City, CA, so I can't
vouch for their sushi, but my understanding is that in Japan, "with Edo
sushi, the sushi with a slice of fresh fish on top of rice, wasabi is
already put inside between fish and rice, and sushi eaters more or less
"passively" enjoy it as it is. Many perfectionist sushi chefs calculate the
complicated balance in a sushi piece -- the volume and temperature of rice,
thickness of fish slice and amount of wasabi, and we are supposed to
contemplate on it on our tongue. With rolled sushi, we usually eat without
wasabi.

This means, when eating sushi, that Japanese people never mix wasabi in soy
sauce! But I see Americans do this frequently.

Now with sashimi, it is not so clear-cut. Although many Japanese do mix
wasabi in soy sauce for sashimi, it is believed the best way is to put a
tiny amount of wasabi on top of the fish and dip the other side of fish in
soy sauce before eating. So, again, we are not mixing wasabi in soy!"

This latter is the way I eat my sashimi, adjusting the amount of wasabi
(and shoyu) to the flavor of the fish.

--
Nick. Support severely wounded and disabled Veterans and their families!

Thank a Veteran and Support Our Troops. You are not forgotten. Thanks ! ! !
~Semper Fi~
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Default Sushi variant in LA


"Nick Cramer" > wrote in message
...
> "Roman" > wrote:
> > Musashi,
> >
> > I agree with you that I was mixed up traditional with authentic.
> > We like traditional sushi.
> > What surprised me was that the first dish the waiter brought us without
> > Wasabi.
> > I complained to him about it. That really ****ed me off hell..
> > Ramond

>
> I primarily eat sashimi muriowase at Asanebo in Studio City, CA, so I

can't
> vouch for their sushi, but my understanding is that in Japan, "with Edo
> sushi, the sushi with a slice of fresh fish on top of rice, wasabi is
> already put inside between fish and rice, and sushi eaters more or less
> "passively" enjoy it as it is. Many perfectionist sushi chefs calculate

the
> complicated balance in a sushi piece -- the volume and temperature of

rice,
> thickness of fish slice and amount of wasabi, and we are supposed to
> contemplate on it on our tongue. With rolled sushi, we usually eat without
> wasabi.
>


That is absolutely correct. The only problem is that it's not everyday that
you get
the perfect balance. Even in one my usual haunts I know which itamae puts in
too much or too little.

> This means, when eating sushi, that Japanese people never mix wasabi in

soy
> sauce! But I see Americans do this frequently.
>


I see this in Japan as well these days. Short of some very stuffy top-end
places I think the
practice is generally accepted now.

> Now with sashimi, it is not so clear-cut. Although many Japanese do mix
> wasabi in soy sauce for sashimi, it is believed the best way is to put a
> tiny amount of wasabi on top of the fish and dip the other side of fish in
> soy sauce before eating. So, again, we are not mixing wasabi in soy!"
>


Completely up to personal preference
Some people even use wasabi only, no shoyu.
I agree the method you describe is the "best" way and certainly fresh grated
wasabi it, I think.
Going off on a tangent, while shoyu and wasabi is the most common way of
eating sashimi, there are other ways as well. In Okinawa and Kagoshima, far
south
of Japan they often use a miso mixture. In parts of Kumamoto they use shoyu
and karashi
(hot mustard). And of course with Fugu (puffer) or Katsuo no Tataki, ponzu
is standard.
There are several different types of "Shoyu + something" besides wasabi that
an Itamae
can use.

M




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Default Sushi variant in LA

Out of curiosity, may I ask what that first dish was?
M

"Roman" > wrote in message
...
> Musashi,
>
> I agree with you that I was mixed up traditional with authentic.
> We like traditional sushi.
> What surprised me was that the first dish the waiter brought us without
> Wasabi.
> I complained to him about it. That really ****ed me off hell..
> Ramond
>
>
>
> "Musashi" > wrote in message
> . ..
> >
> > "Roman King" > wrote in message
> > ...
> >> My wife and I visited Los Angeles for 6 days for a convention and just

> > came
> >> back home.
> >> My daughter who lives in LA assured us to have a dinner at the best

Sushi
> >> restaurant in LA.
> >> The name of the restaurant was "Koi", located in Beverly Hill.
> >> The restaurant is quite dark and very nicely designed.
> >> The restaurant was then almost full but the most of customers were
> >> non-Asians!!!

> >
> > That alone doesn't mean much. The top traditional Japanese sushi
> > restaurants
> > in Midtown Manhattan
> > are always packed with "non-asians"* but their quality is top notch.
> > BTW, "non-Japanese" would make alot more sense, no?
> > For the most part non-Japanese Asians are going out for "Japanese

cuisine"
> > when
> > they go out for sushi. Just like like all other non-Asian customers,
> > Japanese cuisine
> > is not part of their culture and something they are used to.
> >
> >> Then, I sensed that we came to a wrong place to eat Sushi.
> >> After having the dinner, I told my daughter that I would never come to

> > this
> >> restaurant again.
> >> My disappointment was that those Sushi was not authentic.
> >> I would say they were more likely an Americanized Sushi or a Sushi

mutant
> >> for non-Japanese.
> >> Including tips, it cost me $190 for three of us.
> >> My wife said that I now know why we need Sushi Policeman to certify the
> >> autentic Sushi.
> >> For my wife and I, this was the worst Japanese Sushi that we have ever

> > had.
> >> My daughter was born in the US and still hard to distinguish between
> >> authentic and non-authentic Sushi.
> >> BTW, I am not criticizing the Koi restaurant because its purpose seems

to
> >> serve non-Asians.
> >> Ramon
> >>

> >
> > I think you are mixing the term "authentic" with "traditional".
> > You seem to have run into a restaurant which specializes in
> > non-traditional
> > American or Fusion-type sushi. And clearly that didn't meet your tastes.
> > As a traditionalist I also avoid such places. Including, amazingly some
> > fusion-type
> > Sushi now found in even in Japan.
> > Musashi
> >
> >
> >

>
>



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Default Sushi variant in LA

To be honest with you, I do not remember what it was.
I sent an email to my wife, but she does not remember either.
So she sent an email to our daughter in LA.
We still did not receive her reply. Whenever we got her reply, I will let
you know.
One thing for sure is that it did not include fish.
We order so many dishes at the Koi, we were mixed up.
If the dish were impressive to our taste bud, we surely could have
remembered its name.
I now do not want to think about the Sushi at Koi.
Ramon




"Musashi" > wrote in message
t...
> Out of curiosity, may I ask what that first dish was?
> M
>
> "Roman" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Musashi,
>>
>> I agree with you that I was mixed up traditional with authentic.
>> We like traditional sushi.
>> What surprised me was that the first dish the waiter brought us without
>> Wasabi.
>> I complained to him about it. That really ****ed me off hell..
>> Ramond
>>
>>
>>
>> "Musashi" > wrote in message
>> . ..
>> >
>> > "Roman King" > wrote in message
>> > ...
>> >> My wife and I visited Los Angeles for 6 days for a convention and
>> >> just
>> > came
>> >> back home.
>> >> My daughter who lives in LA assured us to have a dinner at the best

> Sushi
>> >> restaurant in LA.
>> >> The name of the restaurant was "Koi", located in Beverly Hill.
>> >> The restaurant is quite dark and very nicely designed.
>> >> The restaurant was then almost full but the most of customers were
>> >> non-Asians!!!
>> >
>> > That alone doesn't mean much. The top traditional Japanese sushi
>> > restaurants
>> > in Midtown Manhattan
>> > are always packed with "non-asians"* but their quality is top notch.
>> > BTW, "non-Japanese" would make alot more sense, no?
>> > For the most part non-Japanese Asians are going out for "Japanese

> cuisine"
>> > when
>> > they go out for sushi. Just like like all other non-Asian customers,
>> > Japanese cuisine
>> > is not part of their culture and something they are used to.
>> >
>> >> Then, I sensed that we came to a wrong place to eat Sushi.
>> >> After having the dinner, I told my daughter that I would never come to
>> > this
>> >> restaurant again.
>> >> My disappointment was that those Sushi was not authentic.
>> >> I would say they were more likely an Americanized Sushi or a Sushi

> mutant
>> >> for non-Japanese.
>> >> Including tips, it cost me $190 for three of us.
>> >> My wife said that I now know why we need Sushi Policeman to certify
>> >> the
>> >> autentic Sushi.
>> >> For my wife and I, this was the worst Japanese Sushi that we have ever
>> > had.
>> >> My daughter was born in the US and still hard to distinguish between
>> >> authentic and non-authentic Sushi.
>> >> BTW, I am not criticizing the Koi restaurant because its purpose seems

> to
>> >> serve non-Asians.
>> >> Ramon
>> >>
>> >
>> > I think you are mixing the term "authentic" with "traditional".
>> > You seem to have run into a restaurant which specializes in
>> > non-traditional
>> > American or Fusion-type sushi. And clearly that didn't meet your
>> > tastes.
>> > As a traditionalist I also avoid such places. Including, amazingly some
>> > fusion-type
>> > Sushi now found in even in Japan.
>> > Musashi
>> >
>> >
>> >

>>
>>

>
>



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Default Sushi variant in LA

Musashi,

Actually, it was the second dish. The first dish was an appetizer, which
was a kind of sliced tuna which we had the same kind in Cafe Bijou.

It seems that all of our family members have short-memory syndrome.
Sorry that nobody remember the name of the second sushi dish.

Roman


"Musashi" > wrote in message
t...
> Out of curiosity, may I ask what that first dish was?
> M
>
> "Roman" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Musashi,
>>
>> I agree with you that I was mixed up traditional with authentic.
>> We like traditional sushi.
>> What surprised me was that the first dish the waiter brought us without
>> Wasabi.
>> I complained to him about it. That really ****ed me off hell..
>> Ramond
>>
>>
>>
>> "Musashi" > wrote in message
>> . ..
>> >
>> > "Roman King" > wrote in message
>> > ...
>> >> My wife and I visited Los Angeles for 6 days for a convention and
>> >> just
>> > came
>> >> back home.
>> >> My daughter who lives in LA assured us to have a dinner at the best

> Sushi
>> >> restaurant in LA.
>> >> The name of the restaurant was "Koi", located in Beverly Hill.
>> >> The restaurant is quite dark and very nicely designed.
>> >> The restaurant was then almost full but the most of customers were
>> >> non-Asians!!!
>> >
>> > That alone doesn't mean much. The top traditional Japanese sushi
>> > restaurants
>> > in Midtown Manhattan
>> > are always packed with "non-asians"* but their quality is top notch.
>> > BTW, "non-Japanese" would make alot more sense, no?
>> > For the most part non-Japanese Asians are going out for "Japanese

> cuisine"
>> > when
>> > they go out for sushi. Just like like all other non-Asian customers,
>> > Japanese cuisine
>> > is not part of their culture and something they are used to.
>> >
>> >> Then, I sensed that we came to a wrong place to eat Sushi.
>> >> After having the dinner, I told my daughter that I would never come to
>> > this
>> >> restaurant again.
>> >> My disappointment was that those Sushi was not authentic.
>> >> I would say they were more likely an Americanized Sushi or a Sushi

> mutant
>> >> for non-Japanese.
>> >> Including tips, it cost me $190 for three of us.
>> >> My wife said that I now know why we need Sushi Policeman to certify
>> >> the
>> >> autentic Sushi.
>> >> For my wife and I, this was the worst Japanese Sushi that we have ever
>> > had.
>> >> My daughter was born in the US and still hard to distinguish between
>> >> authentic and non-authentic Sushi.
>> >> BTW, I am not criticizing the Koi restaurant because its purpose seems

> to
>> >> serve non-Asians.
>> >> Ramon
>> >>
>> >
>> > I think you are mixing the term "authentic" with "traditional".
>> > You seem to have run into a restaurant which specializes in
>> > non-traditional
>> > American or Fusion-type sushi. And clearly that didn't meet your
>> > tastes.
>> > As a traditionalist I also avoid such places. Including, amazingly some
>> > fusion-type
>> > Sushi now found in even in Japan.
>> > Musashi
>> >
>> >
>> >

>>
>>

>
>



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Default Sushi variant in LA

That's ok. It was just a question of curosity.
M

"Roman" > wrote in message
...
> Musashi,
>
> Actually, it was the second dish. The first dish was an appetizer, which
> was a kind of sliced tuna which we had the same kind in Cafe Bijou.
>
> It seems that all of our family members have short-memory syndrome.
> Sorry that nobody remember the name of the second sushi dish.
>
> Roman
>
>
> "Musashi" > wrote in message
> t...
> > Out of curiosity, may I ask what that first dish was?
> > M
> >
> > "Roman" > wrote in message
> > ...
> >> Musashi,
> >>
> >> I agree with you that I was mixed up traditional with authentic.
> >> We like traditional sushi.
> >> What surprised me was that the first dish the waiter brought us without
> >> Wasabi.
> >> I complained to him about it. That really ****ed me off hell..
> >> Ramond
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> "Musashi" > wrote in message
> >> . ..
> >> >
> >> > "Roman King" > wrote in message
> >> > ...
> >> >> My wife and I visited Los Angeles for 6 days for a convention and
> >> >> just
> >> > came
> >> >> back home.
> >> >> My daughter who lives in LA assured us to have a dinner at the best

> > Sushi
> >> >> restaurant in LA.
> >> >> The name of the restaurant was "Koi", located in Beverly Hill.
> >> >> The restaurant is quite dark and very nicely designed.
> >> >> The restaurant was then almost full but the most of customers were
> >> >> non-Asians!!!
> >> >
> >> > That alone doesn't mean much. The top traditional Japanese sushi
> >> > restaurants
> >> > in Midtown Manhattan
> >> > are always packed with "non-asians"* but their quality is top notch.
> >> > BTW, "non-Japanese" would make alot more sense, no?
> >> > For the most part non-Japanese Asians are going out for "Japanese

> > cuisine"
> >> > when
> >> > they go out for sushi. Just like like all other non-Asian customers,
> >> > Japanese cuisine
> >> > is not part of their culture and something they are used to.
> >> >
> >> >> Then, I sensed that we came to a wrong place to eat Sushi.
> >> >> After having the dinner, I told my daughter that I would never come

to
> >> > this
> >> >> restaurant again.
> >> >> My disappointment was that those Sushi was not authentic.
> >> >> I would say they were more likely an Americanized Sushi or a Sushi

> > mutant
> >> >> for non-Japanese.
> >> >> Including tips, it cost me $190 for three of us.
> >> >> My wife said that I now know why we need Sushi Policeman to certify
> >> >> the
> >> >> autentic Sushi.
> >> >> For my wife and I, this was the worst Japanese Sushi that we have

ever
> >> > had.
> >> >> My daughter was born in the US and still hard to distinguish

between
> >> >> authentic and non-authentic Sushi.
> >> >> BTW, I am not criticizing the Koi restaurant because its purpose

seems
> > to
> >> >> serve non-Asians.
> >> >> Ramon
> >> >>
> >> >
> >> > I think you are mixing the term "authentic" with "traditional".
> >> > You seem to have run into a restaurant which specializes in
> >> > non-traditional
> >> > American or Fusion-type sushi. And clearly that didn't meet your
> >> > tastes.
> >> > As a traditionalist I also avoid such places. Including, amazingly

some
> >> > fusion-type
> >> > Sushi now found in even in Japan.
> >> > Musashi
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >>
> >>

> >
> >

>
>



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