Sourdough (rec.food.sourdough) Discussing the hobby or craft of baking with sourdough. We are not just a recipe group, Our charter is to discuss the care, feeding, and breeding of yeasts and lactobacilli that make up sourdough cultures.

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Old 28-03-2010, 09:06 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough,alt.2eggs.sausage.beans.tomatoes.2toast.largetea.cheerslove,rec.food.cooking
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Default I Love Sourdough!



I love my sandwiches made with sourdough bread. I especially like
french toast made with it, too. Tons of butter and maple syrple.

Can you buy sourdough in the UK, or is it uniquely American in usage?
I can buy it in Mexico, but it is imported from the States.

Cheers!


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Old 28-03-2010, 09:33 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough,rec.food.cooking
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Default I Love Sourdough!

Mack wrote on Sun, 28 Mar 2010 13:06:42 -0700:

Can you buy sourdough in the UK, or is it uniquely American in
usage? I can buy it in Mexico, but it is imported from the
States.


You can make sour-dough bread anywhere in the world but it never tastes
quite as well as that made in San Francisco. I think it is a special
sub-species of yeast that reverts to the local varieties even if you
bring some from San Francisco. Nonetheless, making your own sourdough
"starter" is quite easy.
--

James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland

Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not

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Old 28-03-2010, 11:26 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
Sam Sam is offline
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Default I Love Sourdough!

James Silverton wrote:
Mack wrote on Sun, 28 Mar 2010 13:06:42 -0700:


Can you buy sourdough in the UK, or is it uniquely American in
usage? I can buy it in Mexico, but it is imported from the
States.


You can make sour-dough bread anywhere in the world but it never tastes
quite as well as that made in San Francisco. I think it is a special
sub-species of yeast that reverts to the local varieties even if you
bring some from San Francisco.

Total BS!

LB SF (lactobacillus sanfrancisco) has been isolated in several
countries/continents from continuous propagated sourdoughs.

Personal tastes/preferences varies widely. What you may like best can be
another persons sissy bread.

The source of the special "SF SD taste" is a commercially driven
propaganda campaign based in the Bay Area.
Nonetheless, making your own sourdough
"starter" is quite easy.

Sure - getting constant results over time is another question.

Just hope you are not coming back with Nancy Silverton's grape sourdough
stater method. And - isn't/was her Co. importing their breads for the
Bay Area from LA?

Sam


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Old 29-03-2010, 02:20 AM posted to rec.food.sourdough,rec.food.cooking
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On 3/28/2010 3:33 PM, James Silverton wrote:
Mack wrote on Sun, 28 Mar 2010 13:06:42 -0700:

Can you buy sourdough in the UK, or is it uniquely American in
usage? I can buy it in Mexico, but it is imported from the
States.


You can make sour-dough bread anywhere in the world but it never tastes
quite as well as that made in San Francisco. I think it is a special
sub-species of yeast that reverts to the local varieties even if you
bring some from San Francisco. Nonetheless, making your own sourdough
"starter" is quite easy.



The "trick" is not adding any yeast. (most sourdough starter recipes
are bogus, and include milk and yeast)

All you need is flour and water and time. Rye flour works particularly
well to get it going, then you can change it over to wheat flour as you
feed it.

Bob
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Old 29-03-2010, 02:23 AM posted to rec.food.sourdough,alt.2eggs.sausage.beans.tomatoes.2toast.largetea.cheerslove,rec.food.cooking
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Mack A. Damia wrote:

Can you buy sourdough in the UK, or is it uniquely American in usage?


I have bought very good sourdough bread at Borough Market, and
places like Waitrose will usually have it. More ubiquitous
is French bread that is not sour, or not particularly sour.

Steve


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Old 31-03-2010, 08:35 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough,alt.2eggs.sausage.beans.tomatoes.2toast.largetea.cheerslove,rec.food.cooking
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Default I Love Sourdough!

In article ,
Mack A. Damia wrote:

I love my sandwiches made with sourdough bread. I especially like
french toast made with it, too. Tons of butter and maple syrple.

Can you buy sourdough in the UK, or is it uniquely American in usage?
I can buy it in Mexico, but it is imported from the States.

Cheers!


They have sourdough in Germany, in fact it's Hun food!

Cheers!
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Old 03-04-2010, 10:18 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough,alt.2eggs.sausage.beans.tomatoes.2toast.largetea.cheerslove,rec.food.cooking
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Default I Love Sourdough!

In article , jonny
writes

Can you buy sourdough in the UK, or is it uniquely American in usage?
I can buy it in Mexico, but it is imported from the States.

Cheers!


They have sourdough in Germany, in fact it's Hun food!

Cheers!


You can get sourdough loaves at the fancy food shop in the High Street
points inaccurately over shoulder with fork

Or you can make your own, it's not rocket science. Just make a normal
loaf and keep a handful of the dough in the fridge to use as a starter
for the next lot.

--
Cheers, Sue ]
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Old 12-04-2010, 04:49 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough,alt.2eggs.sausage.beans.tomatoes.2toast.largetea.cheerslove,rec.food.cooking
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For someone using it for rye I discovered one can make rye without
sourdough, wheat or even yeast. Just needs the right kind of baking form, I
use one intended for muffins (so I get rye "cakes"). It needs to be a bit
longer in the oven to get a solid crust (with a standard bread form it
still tends to fall apart, the crust does not support it enough). Maybe
some xanthan gum also helps. No need for yicky fungi or bacteria in your
bread.
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Old 12-04-2010, 06:00 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough,alt.2eggs.sausage.beans.tomatoes.2toast.largetea.cheerslove,rec.food.cooking
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"CJ" wrote in message ...
For someone using it for rye I discovered one can make rye without
sourdough, wheat or even yeast. Just needs the right kind of baking form,
I
use one intended for muffins (so I get rye "cakes"). It needs to be a bit
longer in the oven to get a solid crust (with a standard bread form it
still tends to fall apart, the crust does not support it enough). Maybe
some xanthan gum also helps. No need for yicky fungi or bacteria in your
bread.


After all, there are plenty in your gut!


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Old 12-04-2010, 11:42 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough,alt.2eggs.sausage.beans.tomatoes.2toast.largetea.cheerslove,rec.food.cooking
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Default I Love Sourdough!

begone oh blaspheme! the anger of the bread gods be aroused!


"CJ" wrote in message ...
For someone using it for rye I discovered one can make rye without
sourdough, wheat or even yeast. Just needs the right kind of baking form,
I
use one intended for muffins (so I get rye "cakes"). It needs to be a bit
longer in the oven to get a solid crust (with a standard bread form it
still tends to fall apart, the crust does not support it enough). Maybe
some xanthan gum also helps. No need for yicky fungi or bacteria in your
bread.




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Old 20-03-2011, 09:19 AM
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Default

Here is a recipe in case you want to try making it in the UK.

Sourdough Bread - San Francisco Style

Ingredients

* 4 3/4 cups bread flour
* 3 tablespoons white sugar
* 2 1/2 teaspoons salt
* 1 (.25 ounce) package active dry yeast
* 1 cup warm milk
* 2 tablespoons margarine, softened
* 1 1/2 cups sourdough starter
* 1 extra large egg
* 1 tablespoon water
* 1/4 cup chopped onion

Directions

1. In a large bowl, combine 1 cup flour, sugar, salt, and dry yeast. Add milk and softened butter or margarine. Stir in starter. Mix in up to 3 3/4 cups flour gradually, you may need more depending on your climate.
2. Turn dough out onto a floured surface, and knead for 8 to 10 minutes. Place in a greased bowl, turn once to oil surface, and cover. Allow to rise for 1 hour, or until doubled in volume.
3. Punch down, and let rest 15 minutes. Shape into loaves. Place on a greased baking pan. Allow to rise for 1 hour, or until doubled.
4. Brush egg wash over tops of loaves, and sprinkle with chopped onion.
5. Bake at 375 degrees F (190 degrees C) for 30 minutes, or till done.


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