Historic (rec.food.historic) Discussing and discovering how food was made and prepared way back when--From ancient times down until (& possibly including or even going slightly beyond) the times when industrial revolution began to change our lives.

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Old 17-02-2008, 11:23 AM posted to alt.cooking-chat,rec.food.historic
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Just came across this, looking for something else:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/2249273.stm

"Hospital managers thought patients would be too embarrassed to ask for it"

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Bob
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Old 17-02-2008, 04:35 PM posted to alt.cooking-chat,rec.food.historic
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Opinicus wrote:
Just came across this, looking for something else:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/2249273.stm

"Hospital managers thought patients would be too embarrassed to ask for it"


There'll always be an England!

Jerry
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Old 17-02-2008, 05:16 PM posted to alt.cooking-chat,rec.food.historic
RsH RsH is offline
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On Sun, 17 Feb 2008 13:23:27 +0200, "Opinicus"
wrote:

Just came across this, looking for something else:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/2249273.stm

"Hospital managers thought patients would be too embarrassed to ask for it"


And we buy it ready-made in cans here in Toronto :-)... and the can
says 'Spotted Dick' right on the label :-)
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Old 17-02-2008, 06:09 PM posted to alt.cooking-chat,rec.food.historic
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"RsH" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 17 Feb 2008 13:23:27 +0200, "Opinicus"
wrote:

Just came across this, looking for something else:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/2249273.stm

"Hospital managers thought patients would be too embarrassed to ask for
it"


And we buy it ready-made in cans here in Toronto :-)... and the can
says 'Spotted Dick' right on the label :-)


We have a local store that sells British goods and I get it there. Never
fails to get a remark when I take it to work for my snack.


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Old 19-02-2008, 03:45 AM posted to rec.food.historic
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I happen to have a can of said Richard on my shelf even now, awaiting
the appropriate occasion.



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Old 19-02-2008, 05:53 PM posted to alt.cooking-chat,rec.food.historic
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Opinicus wrote:
Just came across this, looking for something else:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/2249273.stm

"Hospital managers thought patients would be too embarrassed to ask for it"


So funny! What is in it? How is it made? What is the recipe?

Cookie
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Old 19-02-2008, 09:36 PM posted to alt.cooking-chat,rec.food.historic
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Cookie Cutter wrote:
Opinicus wrote:
Just came across this, looking for something else:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/2249273.stm

"Hospital managers thought patients would be too embarrassed to ask
for it"


So funny! What is in it? How is it made? What is the recipe?

Cookie


You can find the recipe at the following link

http://www.abc.net.au/centralvic/stories/s1694451.htm


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Old 03-03-2008, 07:22 AM posted to alt.cooking-chat,rec.food.historic
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On Sun, 17 Feb 2008 13:23:27 +0200, "Opinicus"
wrote:

Just came across this, looking for something else:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/2249273.stm

"Hospital managers thought patients would be too embarrassed to ask for it"


Given my name, I thank heaven I was never at risk of having to order
"Spotted Richard" in a Gloucestershire hospital.

The Oxford English Dictionary gives a citation from 1849 for the
earliest use of the phrase Spotted Dick:

1849 A. SOYER Modern Housewife 350 Plum Bolster, or *Spotted Dick.
"Roll out two pounds of paste.., have some Smyrna raisins well washed
[etc.]."

Here is the mouth-watering recipe from the Google books version of the
1851 edition:

"832. PLUM BOLSTER, OR SPOTTED DICK.— Roll
out two pounds of paste (No. 746), have some Smyrna raisins
well washed, and place them on it here and there, roll over, tie
in a cloth, and boil one hour, and serve with butter and brown
sugar."

"746. PUFF PASTE WITH BEEF SUET.— Where you
cannot obtain good butter for making paste, the following is an.
excellent substitute; skin and chop one pound of kidney beef
suet very fine, put it into a mortar and pound it well, moistening-
with a little oil, until becoming as it were one piece, and about
the consistency of butter, proceed exactly as in the last, using it
instead of butter."

I can't be bothered to give recipe 745, since I can't imagine people
racing to the kitchen.

Interesting to see that suet was merely a substitute for good butter.
Nowadays currants are normally found in recipes for Spotted Dick. They
are, of course, tiny when compared with raisins.

By the way, a traditional English meal of faggots followed by spotted
dick must innocently cause offence to some in the USA.

Are there any American dishes whose titles would cause offence to the
English?
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Old 03-03-2008, 03:52 PM posted to alt.cooking-chat,rec.food.historic
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"TMOliver" writes:

No "butter" aboard after the first few weeks out of home or a high latitude
port call, and even on the first day out, no butter for the crew, as it
remained a purchased wardroom luxury until well into the 20th century (or
the earlier advent of canned butter, still a delicacy, but nasty stuff to
those who have used it


Well, well, I'm sure it at least provided some comfort to the cabin boy.

Lee Rudolph
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Old 03-03-2008, 07:20 PM posted to alt.cooking-chat,rec.food.historic
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Richard Wright wrote:
On Sun, 17 Feb 2008 13:23:27 +0200, "Opinicus"
wrote:

Just came across this, looking for something else:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/2249273.stm

"Hospital managers thought patients would be too embarrassed to ask for
it"


Given my name, I thank heaven I was never at risk of having to order
"Spotted Richard" in a Gloucestershire hospital.

The Oxford English Dictionary gives a citation from 1849 for the
earliest use of the phrase Spotted Dick:

1849 A. SOYER Modern Housewife 350 Plum Bolster, or *Spotted Dick.
"Roll out two pounds of paste.., have some Smyrna raisins well washed
[etc.]."

Here is the mouth-watering recipe from the Google books version of the
1851 edition:

"832. PLUM BOLSTER, OR SPOTTED DICK.- Roll
out two pounds of paste (No. 746), have some Smyrna raisins
well washed, and place them on it here and there, roll over, tie
in a cloth, and boil one hour, and serve with butter and brown
sugar."


Not to be confused with Plum Duff which is a pudding bowl shape and contains
no plums. Origin of the saying "up the duff" IMO

By the way, a traditional English meal of faggots followed by spotted
dick must innocently cause offence to some in the USA.

Are there any American dishes whose titles would cause offence to the
English?!


Twinkies and Johnnycakes would get them rolling in the aisles




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Old 03-03-2008, 11:34 PM posted to alt.cooking-chat,rec.food.historic
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New Poster wrote:


Twinkies and Johnnycakes would get them rolling in the aisles



Johnnycake is English. Colonists made Johnnycake back in England (I
don't recall the grain that was used) and in the American colonies, it
was made from corn because that was what was available.
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Old 03-03-2008, 11:42 PM posted to alt.cooking-chat,rec.food.historic
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I've never seen nor read many references to salt mutton

I've only had it once - it's still made in Shetland, and that was where
mine came from. A variant is "reestit" mutton, which is lightly salted
and smoked all winter over a domestic fire on a rack neear the ceiling
(the "reest"). That can't be common these days.

Yummy stuff. I think, like nearly any Shetland product, you can get
it by contacting the Shetland Times office in Lerwick (not so much a
newspaper as a trade commission combined with a Ministry of Culture).

==== j a c k at c a m p i n . m e . u k === http://www.campin.me.uk ====
Jack Campin, 11 Third St, Newtongrange EH22 4PU, Scotland == mob 07800 739 557
CD-ROMs and free stuff: Scottish music, food intolerance, and Mac logic fonts
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Old 04-03-2008, 12:56 AM posted to alt.cooking-chat,rec.food.historic
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Cookie Cutter wrote:
New Poster wrote:


Twinkies and Johnnycakes would get them rolling in the aisles



Johnnycake is English. Colonists made Johnnycake back in England (If
don't recall the grain that was used) and in the American colonies, it
was made from corn because that was what was available.


never heard of it here. If it did exist in this country I would think it has
faded out as never seen or heard of it.
http://www.phrases.org.uk/bulletin_b...sages/660.html


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Old 04-03-2008, 03:50 AM posted to alt.cooking-chat,rec.food.historic
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On Tue, 4 Mar 2008 00:56:30 -0000, "New Poster"
wrote:

Cookie Cutter wrote:
New Poster wrote:


Twinkies and Johnnycakes would get them rolling in the aisles



Johnnycake is English. Colonists made Johnnycake back in England (If
don't recall the grain that was used) and in the American colonies, it
was made from corn because that was what was available.


never heard of it here. If it did exist in this country I would think it has
faded out as never seen or heard of it.
http://www.phrases.org.uk/bulletin_b...sages/660.html


Johnnycake is also an Australian term, but the recipe is different
from the American. The Macquarie Dictionary of Cookery distinguishes
thus: "JOHNNYCAKE. A small, flat damper of wheatmeal or white flour as
big as the palm of the hand. It is cooked on both sides, often on top
of the embers of a campfire or in a camp over. In America, a
johnnycake is made of cornmeal and water or milk."

I have also read of these Australian cakes called 'Jumping Johnnies'.
The mind boggles over what a ribald English mind would make of this
phrase. Perhaps American readers already know this, but in England a
'johnny' is a condom (aka rubber in America). Presumably that's a
fall-about joke for American schoolchildren reading about English
'rubbers' (aka erasers in America).
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Old 04-03-2008, 04:48 AM posted to alt.cooking-chat,rec.food.historic
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Richard Wright wrote:
On Tue, 4 Mar 2008 00:56:30 -0000, "New Poster"
wrote:

Cookie Cutter wrote:
New Poster wrote:

Twinkies and Johnnycakes would get them rolling in the aisles


Johnnycake is English. Colonists made Johnnycake back in England (If
don't recall the grain that was used) and in the American colonies, it
was made from corn because that was what was available.

never heard of it here. If it did exist in this country I would think it has
faded out as never seen or heard of it.
http://www.phrases.org.uk/bulletin_b...sages/660.html


Johnnycake is also an Australian term, but the recipe is different
from the American. The Macquarie Dictionary of Cookery distinguishes
thus: "JOHNNYCAKE. A small, flat damper of wheatmeal or white flour as
big as the palm of the hand. It is cooked on both sides, often on top
of the embers of a campfire or in a camp over. In America, a
johnnycake is made of cornmeal and water or milk."

I have also read of these Australian cakes called 'Jumping Johnnies'.
The mind boggles over what a ribald English mind would make of this
phrase. Perhaps American readers already know this, but in England a
'johnny' is a condom (aka rubber in America). Presumably that's a
fall-about joke for American schoolchildren reading about English
'rubbers' (aka erasers in America).


And then, of course, there's hoe cake.

Jerry
--
Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.
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