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  #61 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2003, 07:35 PM
Reidİ
 
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Default Pukka mealtimes

Following up to Peter H.M. Brooks

Not shocked, but it would be a nice thing if there was a sort of
appelation controllee system for such things, for instance, meat
not grown in the place it alleges to come from.


Why exactly do you support this protectionism?


Knowing the true source of a product is not protectionism.
If the source has to be concealed, what does that say of the
reputation of the true producing area?

Is it that you like the idea of third world farmers starving?


What has political non alignment got to do with it?
But no, I always buy vietnamese champagne, chinese beef and
african whisky. I strongly believe the developing countries
should be given a helping hand by being allowed to forge
developed world products.

Or is it that you imagine that specifying the location also ensures the
quality?


Ah yes, I have been waiting for this one since you mentioned
cheddar.
When a producer can guarantee his product will not be
counterfeited he is in the position to build a reputation for
quality if he wishes. The consumer, knowing the source is able to
descriminate between the good and the bad over time. A piece of
cheese just labelled "cheddar" tells us almost nothing about the
cheese in the present situation.
--
Mike Reid
"Art is the lie that reveals the truth" P.Picasso
UK walking "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" -- you can email [email protected] this site
Spain,cuisines and walking "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" -- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap

  #62 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2003, 08:18 PM
Peter H.M. Brooks
 
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Default Pukka mealtimes


"mUs1Ka" wrote in message
...

"Peter H.M. Brooks" wrote in message
...

However the issue isn't the speed of drinking. It is the exponential
increase in the time conversations take as you increase the number of
people. It takes much longer to serve, chat to, and move through to the
dining room, ten people, than it does six - much, much longer.

Try it some day.

Already have, not a problem. Conversations are in small groups. In my
experience, the exponential effect you described just doesn't take place.
Conversations continue en route to the dining room and thereafter. The
secret is to invite the right people.

Oh, yes, inviting the right people is just the ticket - however, inviting
the same people all the time isn't. So you have to take calculated risks.

If the conversation is in small groups then, unless you are entertaining
fifteen or more people (which I advise against), you have failed. The trick
is to have one group conversation that may, from time to time, divide into
small sub-converstions, but, like a variation on a theme in music, rejoins
the main theme. Otherwise you end up inviting some people and never enjoying
the conversation with them - unless you go in for the horrible '60s cocktail
party convention of 'circulating' what a bore.


--
Middle age is when you're sitting at home on a Saturday night and the
telephone rings and you hope that it isn't for you - 'It takes all sorts'
Milton Shulman

  #63 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2003, 08:19 PM
Peter H.M. Brooks
 
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Default Pukka mealtimes


"Reidİ" wrote in message
...
Following up to Peter H.M. Brooks

Actually it depends rather on the sort of olive oil. Highly refined (pure
yellow) olive oil does have a high smoke point. Extra Virgin Olive Oil,
since it contains many 'ímpurities' has a much lower smoke point and is
quite unsuitable for deep frying.


the usual reason given for not using extra virgin for frying is
cost for no benefit.

Quite. You might as well deep fry crayfish.


--
Middle age is when you're sitting at home on a Saturday night and the
telephone rings and you hope that it isn't for you - 'It takes all sorts'
Milton Shulman

  #64 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2003, 08:24 PM
Peter H.M. Brooks
 
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Default Pukka mealtimes


"Reidİ" wrote in message
...
Following up to Peter H.M. Brooks

Not shocked, but it would be a nice thing if there was a sort of
appelation controllee system for such things, for instance, meat
not grown in the place it alleges to come from.


Why exactly do you support this protectionism?


Knowing the true source of a product is not protectionism.
If the source has to be concealed, what does that say of the
reputation of the true producing area?

Knowing the true source isn't protectionism, agreed, that can be on the
label. Insisting that a generally understood generic name (cheddar, sherry,
port, etc.) is legally only attached to one place is.

Is it that you like the idea of third world farmers starving?


What has political non alignment got to do with it?
But no, I always buy vietnamese champagne, chinese beef and
african whisky. I strongly believe the developing countries
should be given a helping hand by being allowed to forge
developed world products.

If you believe that then you can't, at the same time, support the
protectionism that would insist that whisky comes from Scotland (whiskey, of
course can come from Ireland, Yankland or Outer Mongolia) and that cheddar
only comes from Cheddar etc. etc.. Beef comes from cattle, the location
isn't important.

Or is it that you imagine that specifying the location also ensures the
quality?


Ah yes, I have been waiting for this one since you mentioned
cheddar.
When a producer can guarantee his product will not be
counterfeited he is in the position to build a reputation for
quality if he wishes. The consumer, knowing the source is able to
descriminate between the good and the bad over time. A piece of
cheese just labelled "cheddar" tells us almost nothing about the
cheese in the present situation.

Indeed. This is another protectionist measure, trade marking. It can mean
that the produce is identified with a particular producer for good or ill.
This, however, has nothing to do with regional identities. Joe Bloggs can
buy an acre in Rhiems, plant a few grapes and call the muck he produces
Champagne, if he does the same a dozen kilometres away, he can be
prosecuted. This makes no sense.


--
Middle age is when you're sitting at home on a Saturday night and the
telephone rings and you hope that it isn't for you - 'It takes all sorts'
Milton Shulman

  #65 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2003, 09:21 PM
Robert Klute
 
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Default Pukka mealtimes

On 30 Sep 2003 21:21:13 GMT, Adrian Tupper
wrote:

"Peter H.M. Brooks" wrote in news:3F795E9E.6050601
:



Chota Hazri - Five Thirty (05h30)


What's one o' them then?


Pukka and Chota Hazri are Hindi words adopted by the English during the
time of the Raj. Pukka means, basically, 'well cooked'. For the
English it came to mean first class or proper. Chota Hazri is little
breakfast or early morning tea taken before dawn. For the English, it
means bed tea or light breakfast snack. Burra Hazri would be the later
big breakfast.


  #66 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2003, 09:58 PM
mUs1Ka
 
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Default Pukka mealtimes


"Robert Klute" wrote in message
...
On 30 Sep 2003 21:21:13 GMT, Adrian Tupper
wrote:

"Peter H.M. Brooks" wrote in news:3F795E9E.6050601
:



Chota Hazri - Five Thirty (05h30)


What's one o' them then?


Pukka and Chota Hazri are Hindi words adopted by the English during the
time of the Raj. Pukka means, basically, 'well cooked'. For the
English it came to mean first class or proper. Chota Hazri is little
breakfast or early morning tea taken before dawn. For the English, it
means bed tea or light breakfast snack. Burra Hazri would be the later
big breakfast.


Care is needed with the pronunciation. Burra (often, bara) has the u of
'cup' and means big. Burra with the u of 'full' means bad. You eat it, you
choose.
m.


  #67 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2003, 10:36 PM
Peter H.M. Brooks
 
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Default Pukka mealtimes


"mUs1Ka" wrote in message
...

"Robert Klute" wrote in message
...
On 30 Sep 2003 21:21:13 GMT, Adrian Tupper
wrote:

"Peter H.M. Brooks" wrote in news:3F795E9E.6050601
:



Chota Hazri - Five Thirty (05h30)

What's one o' them then?


Pukka and Chota Hazri are Hindi words adopted by the English during the
time of the Raj. Pukka means, basically, 'well cooked'. For the
English it came to mean first class or proper. Chota Hazri is little
breakfast or early morning tea taken before dawn. For the English, it
means bed tea or light breakfast snack. Burra Hazri would be the later
big breakfast.


Care is needed with the pronunciation. Burra (often, bara) has the u of
'cup' and means big. Burra with the u of 'full' means bad. You eat it, you
choose.

What a useful distinction to bear in mind if you have an unpleasant
breakfast!


--
'They.. sucked the Tobacco smoak in greedily, swallow it down with the
Water. For which reason..generally at..the first Pipe in the Morning, they
fall down drunk and insensible.' - 1698 A. Brand 'Embark Muscovy to China'

  #68 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2003, 11:04 PM
MC_Emily
 
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Default Pukka mealtimes

Care is needed with the pronunciation. Burra (often, bara) has the u
of 'cup' and means big. Burra with the u of 'full' means bad. You eat
it, you choose.


Maybe it's just me but 'cup' and 'full' have the same 'u' sound /

Jaqy


---
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Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
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  #69 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2003, 11:18 PM
mUs1Ka
 
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Default Pukka mealtimes


"MC_Emily" wrote in message
...
Care is needed with the pronunciation. Burra (often, bara) has the u
of 'cup' and means big. Burra with the u of 'full' means bad. You eat
it, you choose.


Maybe it's just me but 'cup' and 'full' have the same 'u' sound /

I knew somebody was going to say that. I was going to go into a further
description of the cup sound, but in the end, I couldn't be arsed.
m.


  #70 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2003, 11:25 PM
Adrian Tupper
 
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Default Pukka mealtimes

Robert Bannister wrote in news:3F7B602F.5080802
@it.net.au:

Adrian Tupper wrote:
No it's the difference between leaping out of bed when the alarm goes
off and pausing for a minute or two after waking up naturally.


What a strange life style. I only have an alarm clock so that I can

keep
my eyes closed till the last minute. I am always awake beforehand.
Perhaps, if I were to attempt getting up at an odd time (currently, I

go
for 5.30 am), then your method might be appropriate, although I have
never had problems with waking at 2, 3 or 4 am when required. My body
clock tells me to wake up.


Me too. I don't use an alarm. When I did I set it at the latest time
possible and, because I hate the things so much, I would wake up
just beforehand, get up and turn it off. Progression onto not having an
alarm at all was quite simple.

I can't reliably wake up too early though. I tend to wake frequently
during the night when I try.
--
Adrian


  #71 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-10-2003, 12:13 AM
Robert Bannister
 
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Default Pukka mealtimes

Reidİ wrote:
Following up to Robert Bannister


No it's the difference between leaping out of bed when the alarm goes
off and pausing for a minute or two after waking up naturally.


What a strange life style. I only have an alarm clock so that I can keep
my eyes closed till the last minute.



but there are many who are not like that.


I call most of those 'teenagers'. I went through that phase too.

--
Rob Bannister

  #72 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-10-2003, 12:26 AM
Robert Bannister
 
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Default Pukka mealtimes

Peter H.M. Brooks wrote:
"Robert Bannister" wrote in message
...

Peter H.M. Brooks wrote:


The post-pub curry is a late supper. If it is a very late opening
pub


then

it might be a Midnight Feast.


Back in the 60s, I knew a curry shop in Bethnal Green that served
very hot and quite horrible curries till 2 am. This was more an
on-the-way-home snack.


In my youth there was a late night horror known as Twiggies Pie Cart.
You could order a number of exotic dishes to stimulate the palate you
could specify that 'hotters' were added. The pies were all at least a
day old. If you made the mistake of dining there (for, at that time
of night everything else was closed) you learned, early in life,
quite what the combination of a bad hangover and heart burn felt
like.


An unforgettable experience was the pie cart in the centre of Adelaide.
After an evening on the beer, one went there and had a 'pie floater'.
This consists of a particularly obnoxious meat pie 'floating' in a
thinnish pea soup. Tomato sauce (ketchup) is, of course, compulsory.

I'm not sure whether the pie cart is still there. Perhaps a South
Australian contributor can tell us.


--
Rob Bannister

  #73 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-10-2003, 12:32 AM
Robert Bannister
 
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Default Pukka mealtimes

Peter H.M. Brooks wrote:
"Reidİ" wrote in message
...

Following up to Peter H.M. Brooks


Tio Pepe is very nice, though these days, being in Cape Town, I usually


have

South African sherries, which are very good indeed.


Sherry comes from Jerez. South Africa should think up their own
designation for their fortified wines.


Indeed. No doubt some day the Yanks will be forced to think up some
different name for the gnat's **** that they call 'Budweiser'.

Presumably you are as shocked when you come accross cheese claiming to be
cheddar that doesn't come from Cheddar.


Only when it's orange. Don't the French or the Belgians call it 'chester'?


--
Rob Bannister

  #74 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-10-2003, 12:36 AM
Robert Bannister
 
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Frances Kemmish wrote:
Robert Bannister wrote:

Peter H.M. Brooks wrote:

I think that the heat moves things out a bit at mid-day and the cool
of the
evening moves them back a little.




Not just weather - life style. In most of the famous Russian novels,
the aristocracy have breakfast (zavtrak) around noon, a meal whose
name I have forgotten in the early evening, dinner (obyed) towards
midnight and supper in the small hours of the morning.


In "Buddenbrooks", by Thomas Mann, which I read in English, the family
always ate "first breakfast', and then another breakfast later in the
morning. I don't know what term was used in the original though.


"Zweites Frühstück" (second breakfast) is still the normal term in
Germany for what we might call 'morning coffee'. Manual workers and
tradesmen, who start work very early, will commonly stop for '2nd
breakfast' at about 9 am.

--
Rob Bannister

  #75 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-10-2003, 01:15 AM
Robert Klute
 
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Default Pukka mealtimes

On Thu, 2 Oct 2003 21:58:43 +0100, "mUs1Ka" wrote:



Care is needed with the pronunciation. Burra (often, bara) has the u of
'cup' and means big. Burra with the u of 'full' means bad. You eat it, you
choose.


I know, the burra mem sahib has hit upside of the head a couple of times
when my 'mis-pronounciation' was too well timed.


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