General (rec.food.drink) For general discussions related to drink that are NOT appropriate for other forums.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2003, 12:27 AM
Robert Bannister
 
Posts: n/a
Default Pukka mealtimes

Peter H.M. Brooks wrote:

The post-pub curry is a late supper. If it is a very late opening pub then
it might be a Midnight Feast.


Back in the 60s, I knew a curry shop in Bethnal Green that served very
hot and quite horrible curries till 2 am. This was more an
on-the-way-home snack.

--
Rob Bannister


  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2003, 12:35 AM
Robert Bannister
 
Posts: n/a
Default Pukka mealtimes

Reidİ wrote:
Following up to Peter H.M. Brooks


I'd hope not! A well made curried sauce can go quite well with a baked
potato or, even better, as the filling of an omelette, though.



curry omelette, never done that.


Nor me, but "tandoori" baguettes, rolls and pizzas are quite common here
in W Australia.

--
Rob Bannister

  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2003, 12:42 AM
Robert Bannister
 
Posts: n/a
Default Pukka mealtimes

Ian Northeast wrote:

A rather strange combination of the delicate art of cooking an omelette
and death by chilli overdose IMO I'd use butter not olive oil too.
Olive oil burns at a rather low temperature.


There are two sorts of omelette. There is the light, fluffy kind,
preferably made with just eggs and no filling - the best ones I've had
were in Belgium. Then there are omelettes with lots of filling: Spanish
omelette, Bauernfrühstück, etc., which are not cooked in the same way
and for which olive oil is perfect.

--
Rob Bannister

  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2003, 01:02 AM
Robert Bannister
 
Posts: n/a
Default Pukka mealtimes

Peter H.M. Brooks wrote:

I think that the heat moves things out a bit at mid-day and the cool of the
evening moves them back a little.


Not just weather - life style. In most of the famous Russian novels, the
aristocracy have breakfast (zavtrak) around noon, a meal whose name I
have forgotten in the early evening, dinner (obyed) towards midnight and
supper in the small hours of the morning.

--
Rob Bannister

  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2003, 01:18 AM
Frances Kemmish
 
Posts: n/a
Default Pukka mealtimes

Robert Bannister wrote:
Peter H.M. Brooks wrote:

I think that the heat moves things out a bit at mid-day and the cool
of the
evening moves them back a little.



Not just weather - life style. In most of the famous Russian novels, the
aristocracy have breakfast (zavtrak) around noon, a meal whose name I
have forgotten in the early evening, dinner (obyed) towards midnight and
supper in the small hours of the morning.


In "Buddenbrooks", by Thomas Mann, which I read in English, the family
always ate "first breakfast', and then another breakfast later in the
morning. I don't know what term was used in the original though.

Fran



  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2003, 01:31 AM
mb
 
Posts: n/a
Default Pukka mealtimes

"Peter H.M. Brooks" wrote
....
Depends on how suddenly you make it happen probably.

Maybe. The study showed that siestas tended to reduce life expectency. I
suppose that, if enough thought were put to the matter, with hydraulic beds
that gently lever you into a vertical position over the final ten minutes of
your kip this might be addressed that way. It seems that we haven't evolved
for long siestaring - it makes sense, even with the Aquatic Ape theory a
siestaring pre-hominoid would present a very easy snack for a crocodile or
shark [though sharks, strangely, don't seem to like the taste of people
much].


Biological evolution is no more a deciding factor when discussing
civilized life. Siestaring is like language, one's got to be born into
the culture; late learning isn't very likely to be perfect. The study
wasn't at all designed and balanced for that. Missing the noon nap and
the late night life definitely shortens life if you're a born siester.
Watch for my obit.
  #22 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2003, 05:02 AM
Peter H.M. Brooks
 
Posts: n/a
Default Pukka mealtimes


"mUs1Ka" wrote in message
...

"Peter H.M. Brooks" wrote in message
...

Yes, this is what had me confused about dinner invitations being made

for
8h00 for 8h30 - you only need a couple of sherries and dinner is very

late
indeed. Far better for dinner invitations to specify 6h30 for 07h00

where
it
is understood that the first hour or so involves Whisky Sours, Obtuse
Dinasour's, Champagne Cocktails, Soire de Gala's or, for the very, very
lucky, Brompton Cocktails. Much more civilised.

I have always considered 8.00 for 8.30 to mean aperitifs served at 8.00,
dinner served at 8.30.
Is this not the case?

Yes, but that is time for a small sherry only, and then only if it is a tiny
dinner party, eight people or fewer - any more and it takes longer even for
sherry.


--
'They.. sucked the Tobacco smoak in greedily, swallow it down with the
Water. For which reason..generally at..the first Pipe in the Morning, they
fall down drunk and insensible.' - 1698 A. Brand 'Embark Muscovy to China'

  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2003, 05:05 AM
Peter H.M. Brooks
 
Posts: n/a
Default Pukka mealtimes


"Ian Northeast" wrote in message
...
"Peter H.M. Brooks" wrote:

"Reidİ" wrote in message


curry omelette, never done that.

I'm delighted to have introduced the idea to you - they are really quite
superbe.

Make the omelette the normal way, with plenty of good cheese, garlic and

a
hint of chillie (around three should do


What is this new meaning of the word "hint" of which I have never heard?
I've never heard of putting chilli or garlic in an omelette at all.

Aren't you lucky to have so much to learn and so much to experience!

- though a teaspoon of West Indian
Hot Pepper Sauce can be a substitute)


"Dave's Insanity" is an example what you are referring to presumably.
The stuff that makes Tabasco taste bland. Or possibly my Jamaican ex
colleague Sam's mother's home made stuff, which was kept reverentially
in a locked cupboard in our office in New Jersey and offered to
unsuspecting visitors (not that I ever saw anyone accept it, when the
lid was removed you could smell it on the other side of the office - not
an unpleasant smell, there was zero chance of this stuff's ever going
off - but enough to make you realise that you would be risking life and
limb by trying a teaspoonful).

No, I wasn't meaning Dave's Insanity sauce - if you were using that then a
half a mustard spoonful would be quite enough! I was meaning Encona West
Indian Hot Pepper sauce.

- note that this is not one of the
flat tasteless things sometimes claimed to be omelettes, but the pukka

thing
[all ingredients whisked well with a fork, omelette pan {rounded, smooth
inside (never 'non-stick'), made from heavy cast iron} well oiled with

extra
virgin olive oil heated to the smoke point, everything chucked in at

once
then quickly folded over until all no longer runny so that a thick airy
delight is produced] - then, just as the omelette is browning slightly

on
the bottom, put as much of yesterday's Chicken Madras, Lamb Bengalore

Phal
meat or better over the whole omelette as it will hold, fold it over,

wait
until almost black on the bottom then serve. If anybody claims to be

hung
over after that they are either lying or still ****ed from the night

before.

A rather strange combination of the delicate art of cooking an omelette
and death by chilli overdose IMO I'd use butter not olive oil too.
Olive oil burns at a rather low temperature.

Butter burns at a much lower one - unless you use ghee.

I'll try this next time I have some left over curry and a hangover. Your
recipe has been duly printed off and parked at the side of my fridge.

How does it compare to whole teaspoonsful of neat mustard or wasabi?

No comparison.

PS did you know about the French aristocrat who got guilloutined because
of his ignorance of omelette making? He escaped the mayhem in Paris and
repaired to a country inn. He ordered an omelette and the innkeeper
asked how many eggs he wanted. He answered "12", so the innkeeper
realised that he must never have cooked one himself and so must be an
aristocrat and shopped him.

An excellent story! Would it were that ignorance of cookery were still
fatal - imagine how much better life would be after a few years.


--
"The highest realms of thought
are impossible to reach
without first attaining
an understanding of compassion."

SOCRATES

  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2003, 05:06 AM
Peter H.M. Brooks
 
Posts: n/a
Default Pukka mealtimes


"Robert Bannister" wrote in message
...
Ian Northeast wrote:

A rather strange combination of the delicate art of cooking an omelette
and death by chilli overdose IMO I'd use butter not olive oil too.
Olive oil burns at a rather low temperature.


There are two sorts of omelette. There is the light, fluffy kind,
preferably made with just eggs and no filling - the best ones I've had
were in Belgium. Then there are omelettes with lots of filling: Spanish
omelette, Bauernfrühstück, etc., which are not cooked in the same way
and for which olive oil is perfect.

I am talking about the light fluffy kind - Spanish omelettes are very stodgy
compared to mine!


--
"Wherever tyranny has ruled, it has been with this insidious claim that the
status quo must not be questioned," - Bantu Holomisa

  #25 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2003, 05:09 AM
Peter H.M. Brooks
 
Posts: n/a
Default Pukka mealtimes


"Robert Bannister" wrote in message
...
Peter H.M. Brooks wrote:

The post-pub curry is a late supper. If it is a very late opening pub

then
it might be a Midnight Feast.


Back in the 60s, I knew a curry shop in Bethnal Green that served very
hot and quite horrible curries till 2 am. This was more an
on-the-way-home snack.

In my youth there was a late night horror known as Twiggies Pie Cart. You
could order a number of exotic dishes to stimulate the palate you could
specify that 'hotters' were added. The pies were all at least a day old. If
you made the mistake of dining there (for, at that time of night everything
else was closed) you learned, early in life, quite what the combination of a
bad hangover and heart burn felt like.


--
"Wherever tyranny has ruled, it has been with this insidious claim that the
status quo must not be questioned," - Bantu Holomisa



  #26 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2003, 09:26 AM
Reidİ
 
Posts: n/a
Default Pukka mealtimes

Following up to Peter H.M. Brooks

it makes sense, even with the Aquatic Ape theory a
siestaring pre-hominoid would present a very easy snack for a crocodile or
shark [though sharks, strangely, don't seem to like the taste of people
much].


Churchill liked a siests, I don't know if he used a shark alarm
or not, though.
--
Mike Reid
"Art is the lie that reveals the truth" P.Picasso
UK walking "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" -- you can email [email protected] this site
Spain,cuisines and walking "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" -- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
  #27 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2003, 09:26 AM
Reidİ
 
Posts: n/a
Default Pukka mealtimes

Following up to Robert Bannister

No it's the difference between leaping out of bed when the alarm goes
off and pausing for a minute or two after waking up naturally.


What a strange life style. I only have an alarm clock so that I can keep
my eyes closed till the last minute.


but there are many who are not like that.
--
Mike Reid
"Art is the lie that reveals the truth" P.Picasso
UK walking "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" -- you can email [email protected] this site
Spain,cuisines and walking "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" -- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
  #28 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2003, 09:26 AM
Reidİ
 
Posts: n/a
Default Pukka mealtimes

Following up to Robert Bannister

There are two sorts of omelette. There is the light, fluffy kind,
preferably made with just eggs and no filling - the best ones I've had
were in Belgium. Then there are omelettes with lots of filling: Spanish
omelette, Bauernfrühstück, etc., which are not cooked in the same way
and for which olive oil is perfect.


I think its worth saying that the only similarity between a
spanish tortilla and a french omelette is egg. IMHO "filling"
isn't the right word for a tortilla, the potato being integral.

As you say olive oil is fine for both frying and deep frying. The
use of butter for a french omelette is presumably for the taste,
as its not a high temperature process, whereas the tortilla
requires raising the olive oil to smoke point.
--
Mike Reid
"Art is the lie that reveals the truth" P.Picasso
UK walking "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" -- you can email [email protected] this site
Spain,cuisines and walking "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" -- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
  #29 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2003, 09:26 AM
Reidİ
 
Posts: n/a
Default Pukka mealtimes

Following up to Peter H.M. Brooks

I have always considered 8.00 for 8.30 to mean aperitifs served at 8.00,
dinner served at 8.30.
Is this not the case?

Yes, but that is time for a small sherry only, and then only if it is a tiny
dinner party, eight people or fewer - any more and it takes longer even for
sherry.


In the real world outside ng's for most people 8 isn't a "tiny"
dinner party.

With the dry sherry in a cooler, place bottles and glasses on a
table and tell the guests to help themselves, there is usually
someone willing to do the job amongst the guests anyway. It gets
them taking to one another and helps to destroy any potential
atmosphere of formality.
--
Mike Reid
"Art is the lie that reveals the truth" P.Picasso
UK walking "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" -- you can email [email protected] this site
Spain,cuisines and walking "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" -- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
  #30 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2003, 10:05 AM
Peter H.M. Brooks
 
Posts: n/a
Default Pukka mealtimes


"Reidİ" wrote in message
...
Following up to Peter H.M. Brooks

it makes sense, even with the Aquatic Ape theory a
siestaring pre-hominoid would present a very easy snack for a crocodile

or
shark [though sharks, strangely, don't seem to like the taste of people
much].


Churchill liked a siests, I don't know if he used a shark alarm
or not, though.

If you have champagne for breakfast then it isn't that much of a surprise
that a siesta is required later.


--
The story of the human race is war. Except for brief and precarious
interludes there has never been peace in the world; and long before history
began murderous strife was universal and unending." - Winston Churchill



Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 05:04 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright İ2004-2019 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017