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Old 11-05-2006, 05:23 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making the "éi" in "sautéing"?

How do you do it on the computer??
Thanks for any info.
Kent



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Old 11-05-2006, 05:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
Jke Jke is offline
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Default Making the "éi" in "sautéing"?


"Kent" schreef in bericht
...
How do you do it on the computer??
Thanks for any info.
Kent


First, type the "comma", then type the e. My computer makes that into é.

The comma is next the Enter button, on my keyboard.


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Old 11-05-2006, 05:45 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making the "éi" in "sautéing"?


"Kent" wrote in message
...
How do you do it on the computer??
Thanks for any info.


I figured it out!
In WP 12 push Insert - Symbol- "é".
The brain is a bit tired this morning.
Sorry for the OT clutter.
Kent


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Old 11-05-2006, 05:51 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
aem aem is offline
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Default Making the "éi" in "sautéing"?

Kent wrote:
"Kent" wrote in message
...
How do you do it on the computer??
Thanks for any info.


I figured it out!
In WP 12 push Insert - Symbol- "é".
The brain is a bit tired this morning.
Sorry for the OT clutter.
Kent


Another way that works in most situations is to hold down the [Alt] key
and use the number pad to enter 130. Thus: é -aem

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Old 11-05-2006, 08:34 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making the "éi" in "sautéing"?

aem wrote:
Kent wrote:
"Kent" wrote in message
...
How do you do it on the computer??
Thanks for any info.


I figured it out!
In WP 12 push Insert - Symbol- "é".
The brain is a bit tired this morning.
Sorry for the OT clutter.
Kent


Another way that works in most situations is to hold down the [Alt]
key and use the number pad to enter 130. Thus: é -aem


Yeah, it's called the ASCII character set. I used to know them all but
these days I'm more concerned about what I'm going to cook, instead!

Jill




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Old 11-05-2006, 11:38 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making the "éi" in "sautéing"?

Kent wrote:

: "Kent" wrote in message
: ...
: How do you do it on the computer??
: Thanks for any info.

: I figured it out!
: In WP 12 push Insert - Symbol- "é".
: The brain is a bit tired this morning.
: Sorry for the OT clutter.

Some of us still read usenet in text: we see either 'saut?ing' or
'saut\351ing'.
--thelma
: Kent


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Old 12-05-2006, 01:18 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making the "éi" in "sautéing"?

at Thu, 11 May 2006 19:34:24 GMT in UkM8g.10241$qd2.458
@bignews6.bellsouth.net, (jmcquown) wrote :

aem wrote:
Kent wrote:
"Kent" wrote in message
...
How do you do it on the computer??
Thanks for any info.

Another way that works in most situations is to hold down the [Alt]
key and use the number pad to enter 130. Thus: é -aem


Yeah, it's called the ASCII character set.


Actually it's the "extended" ASCII character set - the original ASCII is
only 128 characters, the first 32 reserved for all sorts of control
characters. The 256-character set usually used is the IBM extended set.

I wish more places published tables of the character set - along with the
details on how to enter them. A lot of people are confused. Although in
fairness part of the problem is that it's not a universal standard.

What irks me most, however, is the need to use a keystroke combination.
Personally I've never really been able to get used to keystroke combos.
They seem to me counter-intuitive. Which is strange given that IME for most
people keystroke combos seem to be the *most* intuitive way of doing
things. Computers really need to be able to get to the point where you can
have 2 characters overlain on the same space - it would then be a simple
matter of typing an e (or whatever) and then typing the appropriate accent
mark (which hopefully could be incorporated into a keyboard much like a
numeric keypad).

--
Alex Rast

(remove d., .7, not, and .NOSPAM to reply)
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Old 12-05-2006, 04:35 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
isw isw is offline
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Default Making the "éi" in "sautéing"?

In article ,
(Alex Rast) wrote:

at Thu, 11 May 2006 19:34:24 GMT in UkM8g.10241$qd2.458
@bignews6.bellsouth.net,
(jmcquown) wrote :

aem wrote:
Kent wrote:
"Kent" wrote in message
...
How do you do it on the computer??
Thanks for any info.

Another way that works in most situations is to hold down the [Alt]
key and use the number pad to enter 130. Thus: é -aem


Yeah, it's called the ASCII character set.


Actually it's the "extended" ASCII character set - the original ASCII is
only 128 characters, the first 32 reserved for all sorts of control
characters. The 256-character set usually used is the IBM extended set.

I wish more places published tables of the character set - along with the
details on how to enter them. A lot of people are confused. Although in
fairness part of the problem is that it's not a universal standard.

What irks me most, however, is the need to use a keystroke combination.
Personally I've never really been able to get used to keystroke combos.
They seem to me counter-intuitive. Which is strange given that IME for most
people keystroke combos seem to be the *most* intuitive way of doing
things. Computers really need to be able to get to the point where you can
have 2 characters overlain on the same space - it would then be a simple
matter of typing an e (or whatever) and then typing the appropriate accent
mark (which hopefully could be incorporated into a keyboard much like a
numeric keypad).


Unlike the complicated way it's done on a PC (Pretend Computer) where
you have to memorize the entire extended ASCII set, Macs have done
essentially what you suggest for a long time, except that you type the
accent first, and then the letter -- well, almost. Actually, you type
the most likely character to have that accent while depressing the
"option" key (a.k.a. "alt"),then the character you want to have that
accent. So for é, I type option-e, then e, or for á, I type option-e,
then a. Simple, and easy to remember.

Isaac
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Old 12-05-2006, 04:40 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making the "éi" in "sautéing"?


"isw" wrote in message
...
In article ,
(Alex Rast) wrote:

at Thu, 11 May 2006 19:34:24 GMT in UkM8g.10241$qd2.458
@bignews6.bellsouth.net,
(jmcquown) wrote :

aem wrote:
Kent wrote:
"Kent" wrote in message
...
How do you do it on the computer??
Thanks for any info.

Another way that works in most situations is to hold down the [Alt]
key and use the number pad to enter 130. Thus: é -aem

Yeah, it's called the ASCII character set.


Actually it's the "extended" ASCII character set - the original ASCII is
only 128 characters, the first 32 reserved for all sorts of control
characters. The 256-character set usually used is the IBM extended set.

I wish more places published tables of the character set - along with the
details on how to enter them. A lot of people are confused. Although in
fairness part of the problem is that it's not a universal standard.

What irks me most, however, is the need to use a keystroke combination.
Personally I've never really been able to get used to keystroke combos.
They seem to me counter-intuitive. Which is strange given that IME for
most
people keystroke combos seem to be the *most* intuitive way of doing
things. Computers really need to be able to get to the point where you
can
have 2 characters overlain on the same space - it would then be a simple
matter of typing an e (or whatever) and then typing the appropriate
accent
mark (which hopefully could be incorporated into a keyboard much like a
numeric keypad).


Unlike the complicated way it's done on a PC (Pretend Computer) where
you have to memorize the entire extended ASCII set, Macs have done
essentially what you suggest for a long time, except that you type the
accent first, and then the letter -- well, almost. Actually, you type
the most likely character to have that accent while depressing the
"option" key (a.k.a. "alt"),then the character you want to have that
accent. So for é, I type option-e, then e, or for á, I type option-e,
then a. Simple, and easy to remember.




Or you can run the Windows Character Map. Hold down the little window flag
button and type "R" (or click start menu and select "run") and then type in
"charmap" and you have more characters than you can shake a cursor at.

Hope that halps!


--
The generation that used acid to escape reality
is now using antacid to deal with reality
http://www.dwacon.com


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Old 12-05-2006, 04:58 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making the "éi" in "sautéing"?

"DWACON" wrote in
news:dtT8g.51210$k%[email protected]:





Or you can run the Windows Character Map. Hold down the little window
flag button and type "R" (or click start menu and select "run") and
then type in "charmap" and you have more characters than you can shake
a cursor at.

Hope that halps!




Thanks for lé tip ® :-)



--
Peter Lucas
Brisbane
Australia

At this spectacle even the most gentle must feel savage, and the most
savage must weep.

Turkish Officer
400 Plateau
24May1915


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Old 12-05-2006, 05:03 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making the "éi" in "sautéing"?

Alex Rast wrote:

What irks me most, however, is the need to use a keystroke combination.
Personally I've never really been able to get used to keystroke combos.
They seem to me counter-intuitive.


So, install PopChar and you will be able to select any character from a
drop-down or pop-up menu (I don't remember which it is in the Windows
version). Costs $30. http://www.ergonis.com/products/popcharwin/, or
http://www.ergonis.com/products/popcharx/ for Mac users.

PopChar used to be a Mac-only utility and was free for many years. Then
a "Pro" version was introduced which was no better, but I still paid for
it, just to show my appreciation to the author. Now there is a Windows
version, too.

ObFood: Mushrooms in sour cream, Hungarian style. The recipe is from
_Hungarian Cookery Book_ by Károly Gundel. I'd use good wild mushrooms
for preference.

Victor

Mushrooms in Sour Cream, Hungarian Style
(Tejfölös gomba magyarosan)

1 kg - 2 lb mushrooms
100 g - 4 oz butter or fat
750 ml - 1 3/4 pts sour cream
2 onions
paprika
parsley

Wash well, trim and slice the mushrooms. Chop the onions finely and fry
until golden brown in butter or fat. Season with salt, paprika and
chopped parsley. When the water has evaporated, dredge with flour, add
cream, and bring to boil. Serve with fried eggs.
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Old 12-05-2006, 05:13 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making the "ii" in "sautiing"?

Steve Wertz wrote:

On 11 May 2006 22:38:03 GMT, Thelma Lubkin wrote:

Some of us still read usenet in text: we see either 'saut?ing'
or 'saut\351ing'.
--thelma


Lemme guess, you're using SCO Unix? ;-)

My other newsreader is TIN, but not on Openserver Unix anymore.


I used to use trn when I had my university account. Whatever char set
it had rendered most of those non-ASCII symbols as line-draw
characters. People would put in one of those 1/3 characters, and I'd
get a double-line-left-corner or some such. Made the recipes, hmmm,
interesting at times.



Brian

--
If televison's a babysitter, the Internet is a drunk librarian who
won't shut up.
-- Dorothy Gambrell (http://catandgirl.com)
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Old 14-05-2006, 09:36 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
Jke Jke is offline
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Default Making the "éi" in "sautéing"?



You have a non-English keyboard language driver installed.

I'm not surprised. I live in a non-Englishspeaking country
I don't know if the method I use works in other languages, too.

The comma is next the Enter button, on my keyboard.


We call that a single quote or a tic. The comma is tto the right
of "M" on the US keyboard.


Thank you for telling me about that. I don't know what it is called in
Dutch, so I couln't look up the English translation for it.I think in Dutch
they use a French name for it, accent aigu, but mayeb that is something
different.

-sw




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Old 14-05-2006, 11:23 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making the "éi" in "sautéing"?

Steve Wertz wrote:
: On 11 May 2006 22:38:03 GMT, Thelma Lubkin wrote:

: Some of us still read usenet in text: we see either 'saut?ing' or
: 'saut\351ing'.
: --thelma

: Lemme guess, you're using SCO Unix? ;-)

: My other newsreader is TIN, but not on Openserver Unix anymore.

No I'm not. I'm reading w/ TIN on the alpha. My home system
is OSX.
--thelma
: -sw
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Old 14-05-2006, 11:42 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Making the "éi" in "sautéing"?

Kent wrote:

How do you do it on the computer??
Thanks for any info.


I spell it with one e and have my composer set up to check
spelling automatically before spelling. It always picks it
out as and error and offers sautéing as an alternative, and
I should add that I purposely misspelt and counted on the
spell checker to catch it.



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